Children s Health Care (CHILD HEALTH CARE)

Publisher: Association for the Care of Children's Health, Taylor & Francis (Routledge)

Journal description

This well-established journal publishes empirically-based articles addressing theoretical, clinical, programmatic, training, and professional practice issues relevant to the family-centered, developmental, and psychosocial aspects of children's health care. It also contains substantive and methodological reviews pertaining to these areas. As such, it welcomes articles involving parent-professional collaboration and multidisciplinary efforts including nursing, child life, psychology, social work, and related disciplines. The journal's goal is to establish a strong justification for psychosocial care of children and provide an empirical base for professional applications with children and families interacting with health care settings and personnel.

Current impact factor: 0.95

Impact Factor Rankings

2016 Impact Factor Available summer 2017
2009 Impact Factor 0.773

Additional details

5-year impact 1.06
Cited half-life 8.70
Immediacy index 0.00
Eigenfactor 0.00
Article influence 0.36
Website Children's Health Care website
Other titles Children's health care, JACCH
ISSN 0273-9615
OCLC 7048538
Material type Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Journal / Magazine / Newspaper, Internet Resource

Publisher details

Taylor & Francis (Routledge)

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Some individual journals may have policies prohibiting pre-print archiving
    • On author's personal website or departmental website immediately
    • On institutional repository or subject-based repository after either 12 months embargo
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • On a non-profit server
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Set statements to accompany deposits (see policy)
    • The publisher will deposit in on behalf of authors to a designated institutional repository including PubMed Central, where a deposit agreement exists with the repository
    • STM: Science, Technology and Medicine
    • Publisher last contacted on 25/03/2014
    • This policy is an exception to the default policies of 'Taylor & Francis (Routledge)'
  • Classification
    green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This study examined cross-sectional associations among coping, mental health, and asthma outcomes in racially/ethnically diverse urban children. Children (N = 42; 65% female) ages 9 to 17 (M = 11.9) years old and their parents reported on the child’s coping, emotional and conduct problems, asthma control, and school missed due to asthma. Higher child and parent reported secondary control coping was correlated with fewer mental health problems and better child reported asthma control. Child reported emotional problems partially accounted for associations between child and parent reported secondary control coping and child reported asthma control. Secondary control coping may improve asthma by reducing emotional difficulties.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Children s Health Care
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    ABSTRACT: This investigation explored the relationship between food allergy and social anxiety in a school-based sample of adolescents. A total of 849 participants, including 87 endorsing food allergy, completed standardized questionnaires assessing social anxiety symptoms. Food allergic participants answered questions assessing allergy characteristics, worry and avoidance related to allergen exposure and allergy disclosure, and parental worry and control. Boys with food allergies reported higher social anxiety than boys without food allergies, though no differences were found in girls. Social anxiety was correlated with parental worry and control. Findings may inform anxiety prevention programs for youth with food allergies.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Children s Health Care
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    ABSTRACT: This study assessed neurocognitive and social-cognitive skills in survivors of pediatric brain tumors, and evaluated their combined contribution to social outcomes. Survivors (n = 10) and typically-developing children (n = 41), aged 8–16, completed measures of neurocognitive and social-cognitive skills, and social functioning/adjustment. Survivors demonstrated difficulties across domains as compared to typically-developing children. Hierarchical regression analyses with the combined sample suggested that the combination of neurocognitive and social-cognitive skills accounted for over half of the variance in parent-reported social functioning. Inattentive symptoms and recognition of child faces were significantly associated with social outcomes. Increasing our understanding of social outcomes in survivors is critical to the creation of targeted interventions.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Children s Health Care
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    ABSTRACT: Barth syndrome is a rare, x-linked genetic disorder. Few studies have examined psychosocial functioning in this population. The current study examined the psychosocial adjustment in individuals with Barth Syndrome, as well as their parents. A secondary aim was to examine demographic, as well as psychological correlates and predictors of poorer adjustment in order to identify relevant areas for intervention. Individuals with Barth Syndrome completed measures of psychosocial functioning, health-related quality of life, and attitudes toward their illness. Parents completed measures relating to their child’s psychosocial functioning, and reported on their own psychological functioning and coping. Results indicated that the majority of individuals and parents reported normative levels of psychological functioning. Younger age was associated with poorer health-related quality of life in some domains. Increased levels of internalizing symptoms were associated with poorer psychosocial functioning in individuals with Barth Syndrome. Having a child with externalizing symptoms was associated with increased emotional symptoms for parents, as were certain maladaptive coping strategies. Clinical implications are discussed.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Children s Health Care
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    ABSTRACT: This study examined characteristics of children with cerebral palsy (CP) in Jordan and the services they receive based on parents’ report. Profiles of the children and services received were developed based on their functional level on the Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS). Results showed that 74.1% of the children have spasticity. Common associated impairments included speech (60.3%), and visual (40.5%) impairments. The most frequent service received was physical therapy (90.4%). Knowledge of needs of children with CP and current service utilization is helpful for future program planning. Services need to be individualized according to child’s age and functional limitations. Keywords: Cerebral palsy, Jordan, services, GMFCS http://www.tandfonline.com/eprint/mdsaaMPcSzR2MKZMi3Qs/full
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Children s Health Care
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: To examine caregiver ratings of children’s internalizing symptoms as a potential mediator between sleep disordered breathing and pain symptoms. Caregiver depression/anxiety symptoms were further examined as a potential moderator of the mediation model.Methods: Participants were 96 caregivers (82% mothers) of children with cancer, sickle cell disease, or other hematological conditions (M age = 10.45 years; 46.9% female, 78.1% African American). Caregivers completed questionnaires on child patient symptoms during regular clinic visits.Results: As hypothesized, the effect of sleep on pain (? = .31) was reduced (? = .15) after accounting for child internalizing symptoms (? = .17, 95% confidence interval = .03 to .42). The indirect effect accounted for 54.8% of the total effect. However, caregiver depression/anxiety symptoms were not a significant moderator of this mediation model.Conclusions: Sleep may play an important role in the experience of pain in children with hematology/oncology conditions; a child’s mood may mediate this relationship.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Children s Health Care
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    ABSTRACT: The Feeding Strategies Questionnaire (FSQ) has not previously been validated either in a Turkish sample, or on children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). In the present study, the factorial validity and reliability of the Turkish version of the FSQ were examined in order to use the assessment of the parental feeding practices on children with ASD. Further, the parental feeding strategies and their possible associations with various child demographic variables (i.e. children’s age groups, gender, severity, comorbidity, and body mass index (BMI)) were investigated. The present study suggests that the FSQ shows a good internal consistency, adequate split-half reliability, and acceptable factorial validity, which confirms that the FSQ can be used to assess the feeding strategies of parents and their children with ASD in a Turkish sample. The FSQ and factors scores were calculated as a moderate level. There were no significant differences in regard to FSQ by age group, gender, severity of disability, or comorbidity. BMI scores indicate the risk of overweight for a sample of Turkish children with ASD. There was a just significant and negative correlation between the coercive interactions factor of FSQ and BMI average score, which may be interpreted that when BMI score reduces, parents tend to be in coercive feeding style.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · Children s Health Care
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Identifying factors linked to disordered eating in overweight and obesity (OV/OB) may provide a better understanding of youth at risk for disordered eating. This project examined whether ADHD symptoms and body dissatisfaction were associated with disordered eating. Methods: ADHD symptoms, disordered eating, and body dissatisfaction were assessed in 220 youth ages 7–12 who were OV/OB. Results: Multiple linear regressions showed that body dissatisfaction and ADHD symptoms were associated with disordered eating. Discussion: Children with ADHD symptoms and OV/OB may be at greater risk for disordered eating when highly dissatisfied with their bodies. Healthcare providers should assess body image and disordered eating in youth with comorbid OV/OB and ADHD.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · Children s Health Care

  • No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · Children s Health Care
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    ABSTRACT: To examine the relationships between self-efficacy (SE) and social support (SS) for physical activity (PA), weekly moderate to vigorous PA (MVPA), and depression and anxiety in young adults (YAs) with asthma and allergies. Methods: Participants were 611 YAs (age M = 19.56 ± 3.28). YAs completed measures of SE for PA, SS for PA, depression, anxiety, and weekly MVPA. Results: The hypothesized model demonstrated close fit to the data and was not adversely affected by pruning nonsignificant paths, ?2 (457, n = 611) = 1085.31, p < 0.01, RMSEA = .05, CFI = .95, NNFI = .95. The final model supported the hypothesized relationships between MVPA and exercise-related SE as well as SS for exercise from friends. Interestingly, MVPA was negatively associated with SS from parents. SE for exercise significantly predicted SS from family and friends. SS from friends was a significant mediator of the relationship between SE and MVPA. The relationship between MVPA and anxiety and depression was unsubstantiated. Conclusions: In this population, exercise-related SE and SS from friends were associated with higher rates of MVPA. Techniques aimed at boosting exercise confidence and involving friends in exercise routines may increase MVPA in YAs with asthma and allergies.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · Children s Health Care
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    ABSTRACT: This Internet study surveyed 321 parents of youth with type 1 diabetes about family education regarding long term complications (LTC). Parents reported their LTC learning experiences and opinions about amount/timing of LTC education. Parents reported intense worry about LTC but focused initially on daily management. Most parents want input into their children’s LTC education and endorsed diverse methods to motivate children’s self-care. Parents felt that LTC education of younger children should be deferred for several months after diagnosis but that LTC education of parents and adolescents should begin soon after diagnosis. A flexible approach respecting parental preference is likely optimal.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · Children s Health Care
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    ABSTRACT: The current study examined rates of overweight and obesity among children attending schools for the deaf, including factors associated with greater prevalence of overweight. Further, interviews were conducted with school staff to assess school perceptions of overweight and weight management. Although prevalence of overweight and obesity was high (approximately 28%), this rate was not greater than that of youth in the general population, and body mass index was higher among females. Several themes regarding factors contributing to overweight among deaf children, barriers for weight management, and possible components for weight management interventions emerged in interviews with school staff.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · Children s Health Care
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    ABSTRACT: While mothers seeking obesity treatment for preschoolers report poorer child health-related quality of life (HRQOL) than mothers of healthy-weight peers, little is known about this relationship in non-clinical preschoolers. Eighty-six mothers of 3–5-year-olds completed the parent-proxy PedsQL. HRQOL scores for children with obesity and without were compared. No significant differences were found between groups for any PedsQL subscales, nor did differences reach established Minimally Clinically Important Differences. Mothers of preschoolers with obesity from the community did not report poorer HRQOL. If parents do not view their child’s HRQOL as impacted by weight status, they may be unlikely to seek treatments.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · Children s Health Care
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    ABSTRACT: Families impacted by pediatric chronic illness must navigate treatment regimens that can present multiple problems and decisions to be addressed on a daily basis. The extent to which parents and children are able to solve such problems is likely to have implications for health behaviors and outcomes. The aims of this study were to examine correlates of problem resolution in families of children with a chronic illness. Participants were 167 children (ages 8–16) with type 1 diabetes or cystic fibrosis and a parent. Parent-child dyads recounted a recent discussion they had related to illness management and completed questionnaires. The research team coded the discussions for topic and outcome (i.e., did the dyad come up with a plan to address the problem). The results indicated that the majority of dyads in both illness groups came up with a plan during their discussions. Lack of problem resolution during the discussion was associated with higher parent coercion, more child resistance to the regimen, and worse adherence. Parent coercion and child resistance could be the targets of interventions to enhance problem solving and improve adherence.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · Children s Health Care
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: To examine the differential associations between children’s anger expression styles and selected health constructs. Method: Measures assessed sleep problems, medical service utilization, and mental health in 125 children (M = 9.48 years). Results: Anger expression styles predicted health outcomes in a multivariate model. As hypothesized, anger-out significantly predicted sleep problems, number of medical visits, externalizing problems, and internalizing problems. Anger-in was not significantly related to any health outcome measure. Conclusion: This study demonstrates the importance of anger expression styles for health, as they are differentially related to impairments. Clinicians are urged to recognize anger problems to broadly impact children’s health.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · Children s Health Care