Clinics in Chest Medicine (CLIN CHEST MED)

Publisher: WB Saunders

Journal description

Each issue of Clinics in Chest Medicine reviews new diagnostic and management techniques for a single clinical problem--and makes them simple to apply. Its concise, comprehensive, and its editors and authors are respected experts.

Current impact factor: 2.07

Impact Factor Rankings

2016 Impact Factor Available summer 2017
2014 / 2015 Impact Factor 2.074
2013 Impact Factor 2.168
2012 Impact Factor 2.066
2011 Impact Factor 3.284
2010 Impact Factor 3.11
2009 Impact Factor 2.505
2008 Impact Factor 2.357
2007 Impact Factor 1.858
2006 Impact Factor 1.991
2005 Impact Factor 1.456
2004 Impact Factor 1.65
2003 Impact Factor 1.308
2002 Impact Factor 2.026
2001 Impact Factor 1.891
2000 Impact Factor 1.627
1999 Impact Factor 2.042
1998 Impact Factor 1.316
1997 Impact Factor 1.307
1996 Impact Factor 1.133
1995 Impact Factor 1.105
1994 Impact Factor 1.027
1993 Impact Factor 0.972
1992 Impact Factor 1.785

Impact factor over time

Impact factor
Year

Additional details

5-year impact 2.24
Cited half-life 8.10
Immediacy index 0.65
Eigenfactor 0.00
Article influence 0.75
Website Clinics in Chest Medicine website
Other titles Clinics in chest medicine
ISSN 0272-5231
OCLC 5433901
Material type Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Journal / Magazine / Newspaper, Internet Resource

Publisher details

WB Saunders

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Pre-print allowed on any website or open access repository
    • Voluntary deposit by author of authors post-print allowed on institutions open scholarly website including Institutional Repository, without embargo, where there is not a policy or mandate
    • Deposit due to Funding Body, Institutional and Governmental policy or mandate only allowed where separate agreement between repository and the publisher exists.
    • Permitted deposit due to Funding Body, Institutional and Governmental policy or mandate, may be required to comply with embargo periods of 12 months to 48 months
    • Set statement to accompany deposit
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to journal home page or articles' DOI
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Articles in some journals can be made Open Access on payment of additional charge
    • NIH Authors articles will be submitted to PubMed Central after 12 months
    • Authors who are required to deposit in subject-based repositories may also use Sponsorship Option
    • Publisher last reviewed on 03/07/2015
    • 'WB Saunders' is an imprint of 'Elsevier'
  • Classification
    green

Publications in this journal


  • No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Clinics in Chest Medicine
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    ABSTRACT: Sarcoidosis is a systemic disease, with lung involvement in almost all cases. Abnormal chest radiography is usually a key step for considering diagnosis. Lung impact is investigated through imaging; pulmonary function; and, when required, 6-minute walk test, cardiopulmonary exercise testing, or right heart catheterization. There is usually a reduction of lung volumes, and forced vital capacity is the most accurate parameter to reflect the impact of pulmonary sarcoidosis with or without pulmonary infiltration at imaging. Various evolution patterns have been described. Increased risk of death is associated with advanced pulmonary fibrosis or cor pulmonale, particularly in African American patients.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Clinics in Chest Medicine
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    ABSTRACT: Current hypotheses on the pathogenesis of sarcoidosis assume that it is induced by a nondegradable antigen inducing immune reactions, which are mediated by a panel of immune cells of the innate and adoptive immune system. This immune reaction leads to an accumulation of immune cells that is mainly alveolar macrophages, T cells, and neutrophils in the lung. As the antigen persists and cannot be eliminated, the ongoing immune reaction results in granuloma formation and remodeling of the lung. The current review aims to elucidate the different roles of the cellular players in the immunopathogenesis of sarcoidosis.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Clinics in Chest Medicine
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    ABSTRACT: Sarcoidosis is one of the leading causes of inflammatory eye disease. Ocular sarcoidosis can involve any part of the eye and its adnexal tissues and may cause uveitis, episcleritis/scleritis, eyelid abnormalities, conjunctival granuloma, optic neuropathy, lacrimal gland enlargement, and orbital inflammation. Glaucoma and cataract can be complications from inflammation itself or adverse effects from therapy. Ophthalmic manifestations can be isolated or associated with other organ involvement. Patients with ocular sarcoidosis can present with a wide range of clinical presentations and severity. Multidisciplinary approaches are required to achieve the best treatment outcomes for both ocular and systemic manifestations.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Clinics in Chest Medicine
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    ABSTRACT: Chest imaging has a central role in the diagnosis and monitoring of sarcoidosis. For staging of pulmonary disease on chest radiograph, Scadding stages are still widely used. High-resolution CT (HRCT), however, is more accurate in visualizing the various manifestations of pulmonary sarcoidosis as well its complications. A generally accepted HRCT scoring system is lacking. Fluorodeoxyglucose F 18 positron emission tomography can visualize disease activity better than conventional makers in a significant proportion of patients. In patients with extensive changes on HRCT but no parenchymal fluorodeoxyglucose F 18 uptake, prudence with regard to initiation or intensification of immunosuppressive treatment is warranted.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Clinics in Chest Medicine
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    ABSTRACT: Sarcoidosis is a disease with highly variable presentation and progression; although it is hypothesized that disease phenotype is related to genetic variation, how much of this variability is driven by genetic factors is not known. The HLA region is the most strongly and consistently associated genetic risk factor for sarcoidosis, supporting the notion that sarcoidosis is an exposure-mediated immunologic disease. Most of the genetic etiology of sarcoidosis remains unknown in terms of the specific variants that increase risk in various populations, their biologic functions, and how they interact with environmental exposures.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · Clinics in Chest Medicine
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    ABSTRACT: Pulmonary hypertension is a complication of sarcoidosis leading to dyspnea and associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Sarcoidosis-associated pulmonary hypertension (SAPH) can be due to several factors, including vascular involvement by the granulomatous inflammation, compression of the pulmonary arteries by adenopathy, fibrotic changes within the lung, and left ventricular diastolic dysfunction. Several case series have suggested that some patients with SAPH benefit from specific therapy for pulmonary hypertension. A randomized, placebo-controlled trial found 16 weeks' bosentan therapy to be associated with significant improvement in pulmonary artery pressure. Future studies may better define who would respond to treatment of pulmonary hypertension.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · Clinics in Chest Medicine
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    ABSTRACT: Sarcoidosis is a diagnosis of exclusion; there exists neither a pathognomonic clinical feature nor a perfect diagnostic test. Missed diagnosis and overdiagnosis are common. A careful history and physical examination look for "footprints" of sarcoidosis or features suggesting alternative diagnoses. Some presentations are classic and do not require tissue confirmation. A tissue biopsy should be performed if doubt exists. Sampling intrathoracic disease by transbronchial or ultrasound-guided biopsy of mediastinal lymph nodes provide high diagnostic yield with low complication rates. Even with tissue confirmation, diagnosis is never secure and follow-up is required to be fully confident of the diagnosis.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · Clinics in Chest Medicine
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    ABSTRACT: The skin is the second most common organ affected in sarcoidosis, which can affect patients of all ages and races, with African American women having the highest rates of sarcoidosis in the United States. The cutaneous manifestations are protean and can reflect involvement of sarcoidal granulomas within the lesion or represent reactive non-specific inflammation, as seen with erythema nodosum. Systemic work-up is necessary in any patient with cutaneous involvement of sarcoidal granulomas, and treatment depends on other organ involvement and severity of clinical disease. Skin-directed therapies are first line for mild disease, and immunomodulators or immunosuppressants may be necessary.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · Clinics in Chest Medicine
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    ABSTRACT: Sarcoidosis is a granulomatous disease of unknown etiology, most commonly involving the lung, skin, lymph node, and eyes. Molecular and immunologic studies continue to strengthen the association of sarcoidosis with infectious antigens. Independent studies report the presence of microbial nucleic acids and proteins within sarcoidosis specimens. Complementary immunologic studies also support the role of infectious agents in sarcoidosis pathogenesis. Case reports and clinical trials have emerged regarding the efficacy of antimicrobials. They support increasing efforts to identify novel therapeutics, such as antimicrobials, that will have an impact on the observed increase in sarcoidosis morbidity and mortality.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · Clinics in Chest Medicine
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    ABSTRACT: Studies suggest clinically manifest cardiac involvement occurs in 5% of patients with pulmonary/systemic sarcoidosis. The principal manifestations of cardiac sarcoidosis (CS) are conduction abnormalities, ventricular arrhythmias, and heart failure. Data indicate that an 20% to 25% of patients with pulmonary/systemic sarcoidosis have asymptomatic (clinically silent) cardiac involvement. An international guideline for the diagnosis and management of CS recommends that patients be screened for cardiac involvement. Most studies suggest a benign prognosis for patients with clinically silent CS. Immunosuppression therapy is advocated for clinically manifest CS. Device therapy, with implantable cardioverter defibrillators, is recommended for some patients.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · Clinics in Chest Medicine

  • No preview · Article · Jun 2015 · Clinics in Chest Medicine
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    ABSTRACT: Primary lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer mortality in the world. Thorough clinical staging of patients with lung cancer is important, because therapeutic options and management are to a considerable degree dependent on stage at presentation. Radiologic imaging is an essential component of clinical staging, including chest radiography in some cases, computed tomography, MRI, and PET. Multiplanar imaging modalities allow assessment of features that are important for surgical, oncologic, and radiation therapy planning, including size of the primary tumor, location and relationship to normal anatomic structures in the thorax, and existence of nodal and/or metastatic disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    No preview · Article · Apr 2015 · Clinics in Chest Medicine
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    ABSTRACT: The development of widespread lung cancer screening programs has the potential to dramatically increase the number of thoracic computed tomography (CT) examinations performed annually in the United States, resulting in a greater number of newly detected, indeterminate solitary pulmonary nodules (SPNs). Additional imaging studies, such as fluorodeoxyglucose F 18 (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET), have been shown to provide valuable information in the assessment of indeterminate SPNs. Newer technologies, such as contrast-enhanced dual-energy chest CT and FDG-PET/CT, also have the potential to facilitate diagnosis of potentially malignant SPNs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    No preview · Article · Apr 2015 · Clinics in Chest Medicine
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    ABSTRACT: Pulmonary involvement is a frequent manifestation of connective tissue disease (CTD)-related thoracic disease. It is important to characterize the underlying pattern when pulmonary involvement occurs in a patient with CTD, and to exclude other causes. A systematic approach, evaluating each compartment of the lung (airway, interstitium, pleura, pulmonary vasculature) may be helpful. In complex cases, a multidisciplinary approach should be considered, potentially including the pulmonologist, rheumatologist, radiologist, pathologist, and sometimes the infectious disease specialist or oncologist. New techniques, such as quantitative computed tomography and MRI, are expected to be helpful for evaluation and management of CTD-associated thoracic disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    No preview · Article · Apr 2015 · Clinics in Chest Medicine
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    ABSTRACT: Chest radiography serves a crucial role in imaging of the critically ill. It is essential in ensuring the proper positioning of support and monitoring equipment, and in evaluating for potential complications of this equipment. The radiograph is useful in diagnosing and evaluating the progression of atelectasis, aspiration, pulmonary edema, pneumonia, and pleural fluid collections. Computed tomography can be useful when the clinical and radiologic presentations are discrepant, the patient is not responding to therapy, or in further defining the pattern and distribution of a radiographic abnormality. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    No preview · Article · Apr 2015 · Clinics in Chest Medicine