Journal of Education for Teaching (J Educ Teach)

Publisher: Taylor & Francis (Routledge)

Journal description

The Journal of Education for Teaching is an established international periodical which publishes original contributions on the subject of teacher education. It interprets 'teacher education' in the widest sense, to include initial training, in-service education and staff development. The journal welcomes scholarly discussions of new issues, reports of research projects or surveys of research work in particular fields, and contributions to current debates in teacher education throughout the world, generally or on specific issues.

Current impact factor: 0.00

Impact Factor Rankings

Additional details

5-year impact 0.00
Cited half-life 0.00
Immediacy index 0.00
Eigenfactor 0.00
Article influence 0.00
Website Journal of Education for Teaching website
Other titles JET. Journal of education for teaching, J.E.T., JET
ISSN 0260-7476
OCLC 7154185
Material type Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Journal / Magazine / Newspaper, Internet Resource

Publisher details

Taylor & Francis (Routledge)

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Some individual journals may have policies prohibiting pre-print archiving
    • On author's personal website or departmental website immediately
    • On institutional repository or subject-based repository after a 18 months embargo
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • On a non-profit server
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Set statements to accompany deposits (see policy)
    • The publisher will deposit in on behalf of authors to a designated institutional repository including PubMed Central, where a deposit agreement exists with the repository
    • SSH: Social Science and Humanities
    • Publisher last contacted on 25/03/2014
    • This policy is an exception to the default policies of 'Taylor & Francis (Routledge)'
  • Classification
    green

Publications in this journal

  • Jennifer Tatebe

    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · Journal of Education for Teaching
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    ABSTRACT: This study focuses on student teachers’ team teaching. Two team teaching models (sequential and parallel teaching) were applied by 14 student teachers in a quasi-experimental design. When implementing new teaching models, it is important to take into account the perspectives of all actors involved. Although learners are key actors in the teaching process, their perspective is often ignored. Therefore, the central research question is: How do learners experience sequential and parallel teaching? A questionnaire was administered to the 229 learners participating in the experiment. Exploratory factor analysis and multilevel analysis revealed that both models were evaluated positively. However, parallel teaching scored significantly higher on advantages whereas sequential teaching scored higher on disadvantages. Quantitative content analysis revealed additional information. Benefits of parallel teaching were high levels of concentration and involvement and a positive atmosphere. In sequential teaching, learners appreciated the additional support and variation. Disadvantages of sequential teaching referred to the fact that it was confusing and to differences between both teachers. Learners in parallel teaching disliked the splitting of the class group. They were concerned that both learner groups would not be treated equally. These findings reveal that from the learners’ perspective, parallel teaching should be preferred above sequential teaching.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Journal of Education for Teaching
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    ABSTRACT: A plethora of research has found that teachers’ beliefs directly influence their classroom practices and teaching outcomes. While numerous studies in second/foreign language writing have examined the effectiveness of different innovative approaches on students’ learning to write, there is a paucity of research on writing teachers’ beliefs about these approaches and how their beliefs change in the process of their professional development. Such a lacuna becomes prominent in English as a Foreign Language contexts, especially in China, where there are numerous calls for changing the nature of classroom practices from product-focused to process- and student-centred instruction. In order to fill this gap, this brief article reports on a case study regarding changes in two Chinese English teachers’ beliefs after attending a professional development project for teaching writing. A key research question guides this study: What changes, if any, did the two teachers experience in their teaching beliefs during the project? Two writing teachers were voluntarily recruited for a case study. Findings show that the professional development project for teaching writing broadened the teachers’ understanding of different writing theories, provided a clear model of how to integrate these new approaches into regular writing courses, changed their instructional focus and shifted their perception of teachers’ roles in teaching practice.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Journal of Education for Teaching
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    ABSTRACT: Teachers are confronted with complex and unexpected classroom situations that not only demand knowledge but also social–emotional competencies. Consequently, researchers have tried to identify conditions that support the development of relevant abilities in this domain. This study examined the frequently stated, but not yet empirically investigated, idea of immersion in the arts as a facilitator of aspects of empathy and tolerance of ambiguity (ToA). The paper compares Waldorf student-teachers who are strongly immersed in arts activities in their training with non-Waldorf student-teachers who do not participate in the arts on the constructs of empathy and ToA. Results indicated higher scores in the Waldorf group on both emotional and cognitive dimensions of the empathy construct and marginally higher scores on ToA. The results of this study and subsequent discussion suggest a new perspective on the relation between arts engagement and the specific domain of social–emotional competencies.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Journal of Education for Teaching
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    ABSTRACT: This qualitative case study examines the perspectives and experiences of seven Chinese primary teachers on the integration of shared knowledge artefacts into teaching in professional learning communities. The analysis of the semi-structured interviews and observation data revealed that using knowledge artefacts, such as preview sheets, flowing charts and grouping rules, had dual effects in teacher development in professional learning communities in mainland China. Although the participating teachers acquired instrumental skills to meet the requirement of education reform, the ready-made paradigmatic model constrained critical thinking and resulted in conservatism in teachers′ mindsets. The findings highlight the lack of trial-and-error opportunities and teacher motivation in conducting professional dialogues in situated collective learning settings. The study suggests that stimulating teacher agency must be employed in the development of teaching practice under the scaffolds of knowledge artefacts.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Journal of Education for Teaching
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    ABSTRACT: In many PreK-12 school environments, individuals with a variety of professional identities and roles provide services to students. Typically, these individuals are trained with minimal interaction with each other, yet they must work cooperatively with each other in the schools. Interprofessional education (IPE) provides a model whereby students in different disciplines learn to collaborate. This article describes the origins and current status of IPE in the health professions; suggests strategies for applying IPE to educator training; describes a promising example IPE project involving two distinct school-based professionals, pre-service special educators and school counsellors in training, including outcomes documented through student reflections; and offers implications for implementing and sustaining IPE in schools of education.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Journal of Education for Teaching
  • Katriina Maaranen · Harri Pitkäniemi · Katariina Stenberg · Liisa Karlsson

    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Journal of Education for Teaching
  • David Hall

    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Journal of Education for Teaching
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    ABSTRACT: Traditional teacher education’s supposed failure to prepare prospective teachers for classroom realities (the transfer problem) is a widely discussed topic in the teacher education literature. Previous studies have focused on causal relationships between teaching and such factors as pre-service teacher education programmes, contextual factors in the practicum school, and transition shock; however, most of these studies have been set in developed countries, and have paid little attention to the interactions among such factors. This study, involving 35 East China Normal University pre-service teachers, explores the transfer problem in a rural/urban divide context, discusses the possible impacts of pre-service teachers’ previous educational experience (i.e. before teacher education) on their teaching, and examines the interactions among teachers’ previous education experience, teacher education, and practicum schools.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Journal of Education for Teaching

  • No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Journal of Education for Teaching
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    ABSTRACT: Research alone does not inform practice, rather a process of knowledge translation is required to enable research findings to become meaningful for practitioners in their contextual settings. However, the translational process needs to be an iterative cycle so that the practice itself can be reflected upon and thereby inform the ongoing research agenda. This paper presents the initial findings of a study into an international, participatory model of knowledge mobilization in the context of translational research in the field of education. Using a mixed methods approach, the study draws upon data collected from the Education Futures Collaboration (EFC), an educational charity, which has developed an international knowledge mobilization strategy. Through the innovative use of technologies this initiative improves the link between research and practice by finding new and practical ways to improve the knowledge base for practitioners. The EFC has developed two work strands within the international knowledge mobilization strategy, which utilise two complementary digital platforms. The first is the online MESHGuides (Mapping Educational Specialist knowHow), a collaborative tool for connecting educators with visual summaries of educational research from which practice can be developed. The second is the online Education Communities of Practice network, which is used to support international partnerships for collaboration between researchers and practitioners. Findings indicate that utilising web 2.0 tools to develop translational research through MESHGuides is significantly groundbreaking in its vision and scope with respect to practitioners accessing and building the knowledge base of the teaching profession internationally and strengthening the link between researchers and practitioners, thereby increasing the impact of research in education.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Journal of Education for Teaching
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    ABSTRACT: Improving the quality of learning outcomes for all learners represents a major target for the organisers of the 2015 World Education Forum in Korea. Enhancing the effectiveness of what teachers do in the classrooms is a key strategy for reaching this target. This paper seeks to provide some insights into the use of Teacher Effectiveness Maps (TEMs) and the associated targeting, analysing, contextualising, translating, interpreting, changing, suggesting (TACTICS) framework as strategies for educators and governments seeking to document the nature and impact of professional learning activities for improving the quality of learning outcomes for all learners. The USA’s concept of ‘Teacher Leader’ and principles teacher professional learning provide a conceptual lens for interpreting the impact of using these strategies. Despite the limitations of a pilot size of two, the results offer some useful insights about designing and documenting teacher leader professional learning activities for improving the quality of learning outcomes for all learners. The authors identify the integration of collaborative teacher leader professional learning and the use of TEMs as promising practices for improving the quality of learning for all learner in the post-2015 era among the benefits linked to this research agenda.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Journal of Education for Teaching
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    ABSTRACT: Research alone does not inform practice, rather a process of knowledge translation is required to enable research findings to become meaningful for practitioners in their contextual settings. However, the translational process needs to be an iterative cycle so that the practice itself can be reflected upon and thereby inform the ongoing research agenda. This paper presents the initial findings of a study into an international, participatory model of knowledge mobilisation in the context of translational research in the field of education. Using a mixed methods approach, the study draws upon data collected from the Education Futures Collaboration (EFC), an educational charity, which has developed an international knowledge mobilisation strategy. Through the innovative use of technologies, this initiative improves the link between research and practice by finding new and practical ways to improve the knowledge base for practitioners. The EFC has developed two work strands within the international knowledge mobilisation strategy, which utilises two complementary digital platforms. The first is the online MESHGuides (Mapping Educational Specialist knowHow), a collaborative tool for connecting educators with visual summaries of educational research from which practice can be developed. The second is the online Education Communities of Practice network, which is used to support international partnerships for collaboration between researchers and practitioners. Findings indicate that utilising web 2.0 tools to develop translational research through MESHGuides is significantly groundbreaking in its vision and scope with respect to practitioners accessing and building the knowledge base of the teaching profession internationally and strengthening the link between researchers and practitioners, thereby increasing the impact of research in education.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Journal of Education for Teaching
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    ABSTRACT: The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development periodically surveys teaching and learning issues (the TALIS surveys) in the most developed countries. In their 2009 report, they commented that although teacher quality is the fundamental component in high performing systems, the education sector has been slow to develop systemic approaches for the safeguarding, sharing and building of knowledge and intellectual capital underpinning practice. Despite the fact that Knowledge and Information Management practices are being developed and refined in many widespread public and private sector organisations, the education sector seems to be far behind, for example, that of medicine. Search Google for example for the concept of ‘translational research' i.e. research work which bridges the theory practice gap, and note the extensive work in medicine and the lack of translational research work in education. This paper highlights some of the prospects and challenges to knowledge management in two contrasting contexts: the education systems in Pakistan and that in England. Pakistan is poised to invest in the up-skilling of a million teachers. In England, the drive to improve educational standards of young people remains a consistent priority regardless of changes in government. Whilst the two countries are at different stages of development of their teacher education programmes nevertheless they face a common challenge: how to improve the quality of teaching so as to maximise the learning of school students. The paper discusses how the MESH ‘translational research’ model, described elsewhere in this special edition, might provide a useful model for developing new forms of educational research collaboration and publishing in Pakistan. Pilot work has already started with the main goals of making educational research already undertaken in Pakistan accessible to teacher educators and serving teachers and to use online networking to collaborate with others elsewhere. The model uses communication technologies to ensure such an approach is low in cost which increases the chance of long-term sustainability.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Journal of Education for Teaching
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    ABSTRACT: Recent research has shown that improving education processes has become a priority for all governments. There have also been recent calls for the knowledge that is already in existence to be used more effectively to improve these education systems both internationally and nationally. For research evidence to be used more effectively, it is important to know the extent to which research evidence is currently being used by teachers and their schools. This paper reports on research into the research practices used by teachers and their schools, and the value that teachers ascribe to those research practices. A questionnaire focusing on the use of research in schools shows the importance of asking about practices rather than attitudes when questioning practitioners. This research highlights the value-practice gaps, between the extent that a research practice is being used by a teacher or a school and the value that teachers ascribe to that practice. The study shows a consistent gap between how much teachers value the use of research and how much they use research in their daily practices. This study gives some useful insights into the debate surrounding practitioners use of research in schools.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Journal of Education for Teaching
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    ABSTRACT: In response to evidence that teacher quality has the greatest in-school impact on student learning, and the consequent need for reform of intial teacher education, clinical approaches to the preparation of pre-service teachers have gained international prominence since the turn of the twenty-first century. This adaptation of medical discourse for the preparation of teachers has presented a new paradigm for teacher preparation and professional learning: a key tenet of this approach is the ‘translation’ and application of theory and research in the sites of practice. This paper will explore the ways in which two clinical pre-service teacher preparation programme, The Master of Teaching at the University of Melbourne and the Partnership Model at the University of Glasgow, utilise clinical approaches to develop the research-informed practice of pre-service teachers working at designated clinical sites (schools). A central aspect of this paper is a discussion of the ways in which the medical metaphor and its consequent models can be effectively translated into different national contexts, and the affordances and appropriations required when undertaking this cross-disciplinary work.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Journal of Education for Teaching