Police Studies Intnl Review of Police Development (Police Stud Int Rev Police Dev)

Publisher: Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences. Police Section, Emerald

Journal description

Discontinued in 1996. Merged into Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies and Management (1363-951X).

Current impact factor: 0.00

Impact Factor Rankings

Additional details

5-year impact 0.00
Cited half-life 0.00
Immediacy index 0.00
Eigenfactor 0.00
Article influence 0.00
Website Police Studies: International Review of Police Development website
Other titles Police studies
ISSN 0141-2949
OCLC 3834971
Material type Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Journal / Magazine / Newspaper, Internet Resource

Publisher details

Emerald

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Voluntary deposit by author of author's pre-print or author's post-print allowed on author's personal website or Institutional repository
    • If mandated by a funding agency, the author's post-print may be deposited in any open access repository after a 24 months embargo period
    • Author's pre-print and Author's post-print not allowed on subject-based repository
    • Must link to publisher version with DOI
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Published source must be acknowledged with set statement
    • Non-commercial
    • Publisher last contacted on 02/04/2013
  • Classification
    green

Publications in this journal


  • No preview · Article · Apr 2010 · Police Studies Intnl Review of Police Development
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    ABSTRACT: Turkish police organizational structures have changed dramatically since their inception and it is likely that further organizational changes and restructuring in police services will take place in the near future. Currently there is a trend slowly towards decentralization from the existing highly centralized system, and there are some proposals for future changes. This paper first of all explores different forms of police organizations responsible for public policing, then it considers the current slow trend towards decentralization and proposals for future changes in central and provincial police units. The paper argues that although there is evidence of decentralization, it is likely to take long time to realize a decentralized policing system in Turkey.
    No preview · Article · Apr 1996 · Police Studies Intnl Review of Police Development
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    ABSTRACT: People call the police and want them to handle a variety of matters besides criminal ones. The city is divided into various communities with different functions and routine activity patterns. This paper examines how calls for police service vary with routine activities and time between two residential areas that are opposites on the quality of life spectrum. The study site is Charlotte, North Carolina, and the data are the calls for service received by the police department during 1986.
    No preview · Article · Apr 1996 · Police Studies Intnl Review of Police Development
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    ABSTRACT: Over three hundred police officers from the District of Columbia were surveyed as they waited for court appearances. Although police officers were satisfied with their jobs, morale was low. Background and situational variables did not adequately predict satisfaction levels. Satisfaction levels were better predicted given an officer's attitudes toward their fellow officers, their superiors, and the race-relations/promotion process within the Department.
    No preview · Article · Apr 1996 · Police Studies Intnl Review of Police Development
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to assess the effectiveness of SFST training in North Carolina. Effectiveness was assessed by comparing differences in the following variables before and after training: (1) the officers' DWI arrest rates, (2) the officers' DWI conviction rates, and (3) the arrested drivers' blood alcohol concentration (BAC) levels. Other variables examined included: the officers' confidence levels in (4) identifying DWI drivers, (5) writing complete and accurate reports about DWI drivers; and (6) testifying clearly and convincingly in court. The results of this study suggest that officers equipped with SFST training are more confident in their abilities to detect DWI offenders, to write a complete and accurate report, and to testify in court clearly and convincingly. Also there is some evidence that these increased abilities correlate with an increase in DWI arrests.
    No preview · Article · Apr 1996 · Police Studies Intnl Review of Police Development
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    ABSTRACT: Measures the impact of armed U. S. Coast Guard boardings on those aboard boarded vessels. A sample of fifty subjects (half members of a graduate class on "Maritime Crime and its Prevention", half others), completed questionnaires after experiencing a (pre-arranged but undisclosed) interception and boarding by a U. S. Coast Guard Cutter of the vessel on which they were traveling. Subjects reported satisfaction with the conduct of the boarding, but experienced different anxiety levels during the encounter, ranging from low levels (one third), medium levels (one third) to relatively high levels of anxiety. Boarding parties should be concerned with the latter group. Training and sensitivity to deal with that group needs to be emphasized.
    No preview · Article · Apr 1996 · Police Studies Intnl Review of Police Development
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    ABSTRACT: This study examines community policing in Virginia. The methodology included (1) a telephone survey to identify programs and (2) questionnaires mailed to police agencies with community policing, and serving populations over 100,000. Information was collected to examine community policing, and departmental influence on both program strategies and community involvement. The nine programs identified had varying strategies, features, and activities. Most reported permanent assignment of officers in neighborhoods, problem solving, and foot patrol. Neighborhood substations were less common. Although not significant, a correlation was found between departmental commitment to community policing and community involvement. Policy implications of the study are also presented.
    No preview · Article · Mar 1996 · Police Studies Intnl Review of Police Development
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    ABSTRACT: Property forfeiture has become one of the more controversial law enforcement techniques currently employed in the War on Drugs. The extensive use of administrative and civil-judicial forfeiture proceedings has resulted in increased criticism of the program because of their limited protections for suspects and relaxed burdens of proof for the government. This paper employs a qualitative and quantitative approach in examining the merits of the criminal forfeiture proceeding, a seldom used alternative to the favored administrative and civil proceedings. The authors argue for an increased utilization of criminal forfeiture to effectively meet the goals of law enforcement and protect the individual rights of property owners.
    No preview · Article · Mar 1996 · Police Studies Intnl Review of Police Development
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    ABSTRACT: While many believe that community policing has advanced beyond the defining stage, conflict still exists between community policing as envisioned by academics and theorists and community policing as interpreted and practiced by police organizations. Why is there so much disparity between the theory and application of community policing? Part of the answer lies in the differing utility the concept holds for practitioners and researchers. Analyzed within the precepts of the Trojanowicz Paradigm, content analyses of community policing job descriptions and definitions were performed on data obtained during a 1994 national survey of police departments conducted by Trojanowicz, Woods, et al. Results were surprising, yet consistent with many case studies which trace implementation problems to the failure of the larger organization to incorpyorate the community policing philosophy.
    No preview · Article · Mar 1996 · Police Studies Intnl Review of Police Development
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    ABSTRACT: Considerable theoretical scholarship on police agencies have speculated the importance of police and public agency induced frustration and strain on police behavior, including explaining frustration and strain induced police deviance. Current studies of police agencies are, however, beginning to empirically assess police patterned frustration and strain, as well as commitment to community policing, on police officer attitudes and behavior. While the impact of police environments riddled with high frustration and strain on the attitudes and behaviors of American police officers, including its impact on commitment of American police officers to community policing, are now being clarified, very little is known, about police frustration, strain, and commitment to community policing outside the United States. This study empirically assesses how common the experiences of frustration, strain, and commitment to community policing are between police officers in the United States and England. Overall, the findings reveal a high level of frustration and strain among police officers in both countries. Further, the study reveal important levels of commitment to community policing in both countries. Nevertheless, patrol officers in both countries are less committed to community policing than are their administrative supervisors.
    No preview · Article · Mar 1996 · Police Studies Intnl Review of Police Development
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    ABSTRACT: A study which explores the relationship between law enforcement intelligence and social research. The author argues that because law enforcement intelligence draws heavily upon the use of research methodologies, analysts employed in the field can benefit from the knowledge and skills of social scientists. The study compares some of the most frequently used qualitative data collection methods and analytic techniques employed by intelligence analysts with those of the social scientist. The study concludes that providing tertiary education in social research methods for law enforcement intelligence personnel, or alternatively, recruiting social scientists as analysts would be most beneficial, and points to similar positive situations experienced by the CIA in its exchange program with various universities.
    No preview · Article · Mar 1996 · Police Studies Intnl Review of Police Development
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    ABSTRACT: Twenty-nine all-women police units have recently (1994) been established by the Tamil Nadu State Police in South India. These units generally consist of 15 women constables and 2 sub-inspectors under the command of an Inspector. They mainly deal with family-related disputes and cases involving women and children, but also serve the full range of general police functions. The units were established for two main reasons: (i) to engender trust in the police among women victims and (ii) to provide an independent career structure for women police officers. Interviews with officers in five of these units revealed a high level of satisfaction with the work and the career prospects. Many more of the women in the units than in a general sample of women officers questioned in 1988 expressed interest in performing the full range of police duties, but they also said they would like to do this in units staffed only by women. More detailed evaluations of the units are needed to see how far the units address the needs of women police officers in traditional cultures.
    No preview · Article · Feb 1996 · Police Studies Intnl Review of Police Development

  • No preview · Article · Feb 1996 · Police Studies Intnl Review of Police Development
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    ABSTRACT: The movement, in the United Kingdom, towards the adoption of proactive policing strategies, and the concomitant emphasis on the use of informers, has resulted in police managers actively encouraging detective officers to increase their use of what is seen by them as a useful resource. However, such managerial exhortations have not been accompanied by the introduction of satisfactory control mechanisms. Drawing on data obtained over a two year period from detailed interviews with detectives and informers, a comprehensive questionnaire and the examination of police files, the paper identifies negative consequences that informer-based policing policies are producing for individual officers, police forces and ultimately, the criminal justice system.
    No preview · Article · Feb 1996 · Police Studies Intnl Review of Police Development
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    ABSTRACT: The issue of police reform has become especially salient in Northern Ireland since the announcement of a ceasefire in September 1994. This article examines several major policing problems in this society and the kinds of reforms necessary to normalize policing. Particular emphasis is placed on the need to relax a host of counterinsurgency practices and on changes in the larger political context.
    No preview · Article · Feb 1996 · Police Studies Intnl Review of Police Development

  • No preview · Article · Feb 1996 · Police Studies Intnl Review of Police Development

  • No preview · Article · Jan 1996 · Police Studies Intnl Review of Police Development
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    ABSTRACT: Evaluations of criminal justice policy increasingly employ randomized experiments, especially in studies of policing. These experiments, however, raise important ethical, legal and practical issues. This paper explores some of these issues as viewed by police officers. It focuses on the Milwaukee Domestic Violence Experiment.
    No preview · Article · Jan 1996 · Police Studies Intnl Review of Police Development

  • No preview · Article · Jan 1996 · Police Studies Intnl Review of Police Development
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    ABSTRACT: Selection criteria for individuals seeking to become police officers continues to receive attention from practitioners and academicians. However, an area of equal, if not greater importance, selection criteria for police chiefs, continues to receive minimal attention. After examining the findings of a content analysis of advertisements for the position of police chief and conducting a survey of a purposive sample of police chiefs, a national, randomly selected sample of police chiefs was surveyed. The results indicate that police chiefs support police management experience and extensive training and education as two important selection criteria. Furthermore, they indicate that leadership and communication are the two top skills a police chief should possess. A brief discussion of these findings' implications is offered.
    No preview · Article · Jan 1996 · Police Studies Intnl Review of Police Development