The International Journal of Aging and Human Development (INT J AGING HUM DEV)

Publisher: Baywood Publishing

Journal description

Under what conditions does "development" end? Under what conditions does "aging" begin? Can these conditions themselves be modified by intervention at the psychological, social, or biological levels? To what extent are patterns of development and aging attributable to biological factors? To psychological factors? How can the social and behavioral sciences contribute to the actualization of human potential throughout the entire life span? What are the implications of gerontological research for our understanding of the total development of human organism? These are some of the broad questions with which the International Journal of Aging and Human Development is concerned. Emphasis is upon psychological and social studies of aging and the aged. However, the Journal also publishes research that introduces observations from other fields that illuminate the "human" side of gerontology, or utilizes gerontological observations to illuminate in other fields.


Journal Impact: 0.64*

*This value is calculated using ResearchGate data and is based on average citation counts from work published in this journal. The data used in the calculation may not be exhaustive.

Journal impact history

2016 Journal impact Available summer 2017
2015 Journal impact 0.64
2014 Journal impact 1.07
2013 Journal impact 1.09
2012 Journal impact 1.22
2011 Journal impact 1.19
2010 Journal impact 1.86
2009 Journal impact 1.28
2008 Journal impact 1.26
2007 Journal impact 1.12
2006 Journal impact 1.20
2005 Journal impact 0.72
2004 Journal impact 0.51
2003 Journal impact 0.84
2002 Journal impact 0.47
2001 Journal impact 0.53
2000 Journal impact 0.79

Journal impact over time

Journal impact
Year

Additional details

Cited half-life >10.0
Immediacy index 0.03
Eigenfactor 0.00
Article influence 0.42
Website International Journal of Aging and Human Development, The website
Other titles International journal of aging & human development, International journal of aging and human development
ISSN 0091-4150
OCLC 1788134
Material type Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Journal / Magazine / Newspaper, Internet Resource

Publisher details

This journal may support self-archiving.
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Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: This study examined the longitudinal relationships between functional health in later years and three types of productive activities: volunteering, full-time, and part-time work. Using the data from five waves (2000-2008) of the Health and Retirement Study, we applied multivariate latent growth curve modeling to examine the longitudinal relationships among individuals 50 or over. Functional health was measured by limitations in activities of daily living. Individuals who volunteered, worked either full time or part time exhibited a slower decline in functional health than nonparticipants. Significant associations were also found between initial functional health and longitudinal changes in productive activity participation. This study provides additional support for the benefits of productive activities later in life; engagement in volunteering and employment are indeed associated with better functional health in middle and old age.
    Article · Jul 2016 · The International Journal of Aging and Human Development
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Guided by a stress-buffering model, this study examined the effect of the caregiver stress on depressive symptoms, specifically the moderating effects of social support and volunteering on the relationship between stress and depressive symptoms among grandparent caregivers. The 2010 Health and Retirement Survey included a sample of 1,973 grandparent caregivers who reported their stress scores. Findings suggest that positive social support and volunteering significantly moderated the relationship between stress and depressive symptoms. In particular, the study revealed that perceived quality of relations may help grandparent caregivers cope with their ongoing stress and enlarged social interaction may buffer the increase of negative stressor outcomes.
    Article · Jul 2016 · The International Journal of Aging and Human Development
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: The remaining years of healthy life expectancy (RYH) at age 65 years can be calculated as RYH (65) = healthy life expectancy–aged 65 years. This study confirms the associations between socioeconomic indicators and the RYH (65) in 148 countries. The RYH data were obtained from the World Health Organization. Significant positive correlations between RYH (65) in men and women and the socioeconomic indicators national income, education level, and improved drinking water were found. Finally, the predictors of RYH (65) in men and women were used to build a model of the RYH using higher socioeconomic indicators (R2 = 0.744, p < .001). Overall country-level educational attainment, national income level, and improved water quality influenced the RYH at 65 years. Therefore, policymaking to improve these country-level socioeconomic factors is expected to have latent effects on RYH in older age.
    Article · Jul 2016 · The International Journal of Aging and Human Development
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: This study classifies the retirement process and empirically identifies the individual and institutional characteristics determining the retirement process of the aged in South Korea, Germany, and the United States. Using data from the Cross-National Equivalent File, we use a multinomial logistic regression with individual factors, public pension, and an interaction term between an occupation and an education level. We found that in Germany, the elderly with a higher education level were more likely to continue work after retirement with a relatively well-developed social support system, while in Korea, the elderly, with a lower education level in almost all occupation sectors, tended to work off and on after retirement. In the United States, the public pension and the interaction terms have no statistically significant impact on work after retirement. In both Germany and Korea, receiving a higher pension decreased the probability of working after retirement, but the influence of a pension in Korea was much greater than that of Germany. In South Korea, the elderly workers, with lower education levels, tended to work off and on repeatedly because there is no proper security in both the labor market and pension system.
    Article · Jul 2016 · The International Journal of Aging and Human Development
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: The aim of this article is to explore the perceptions of successful ageing among Iranian elderly. The data were collected in Tehran city on 60 older adults using a semistructured interview. The collected data were analyzed using directed content analysis. The findings revealed various dimensions of successful ageing among Iranian older adults. Social well-being is the most prevalent dimension of successful ageing, followed by psychological well-being, physical health, spirituality and transcendence, financial security, and an elder-friendly environmental and social context. Also, the findings from this study provide a new understanding of successful ageing in the context of Iran and contribute additional elements. This qualitative study highlights the importance of multidimensional and contextual viewpoints to successful ageing. In conclusion, to achieve multidimensional successful ageing, the interaction between all levels of successful ageing such as individual, family, and environment must be considered.
    Article · Jul 2016 · The International Journal of Aging and Human Development
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: The authors examined the prevalence of self-reported ageist behaviors in a lifespan sample ranging in age from 13 to 91 years. Participants completed the Relating to Older People Evaluation (Cherry & Palmore). Results indicated that adolescents and young adults reported fewer ageist behaviors overall than did middle-aged and older adults. Positive ageist behaviors were more frequent than negative ageist behaviors for people of all ages. Women endorsed positive ageism items more often than men, although men and women did not differ in frequency of negative ageist behaviors. Follow-up analyses on participants’ responses to two knowledge of aging measures, the Facts on Aging Quiz and the Knowledge of Memory Aging Questionnaire, showed that knowledge of aging was significantly correlated with negative ageist behaviors, after controlling for age and gender. Implications of these findings for current views of ageism (positive and negative) are discussed.
    Article · Jul 2016 · The International Journal of Aging and Human Development
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: We investigated characteristics of younger and older adults’ friendships. Younger (N = 39) and older (N = 39) adults completed measures pertaining to a specific friend they had (i.e., contact frequency, positive friendship quality, and negative friendship quality) and their frequency of problems with friends in general. Older adults reported fewer problems with friends in general, and fewer negative friendship qualities, less frequent contact, and more positive friendship qualities with a specific friend than younger adults. Contact frequency, positive friendship quality, and negative friendship quality with a specific friend were related to frequency of problems with friends in general, but only contact frequency was a significant mediator of the relation between age and frequency of problems with friends in general. Results show that characteristics of a specific friendship relate to problems with friends in general, and that contact frequency with a specific friend mediates the relation between age and problems with friends in general. Implications are discussed.
    Article · Jul 2016 · The International Journal of Aging and Human Development
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Individuals’ Subjective Well-being (SWB) increases as they grow older. Past literature suggests that emotional intelligence may increase with age and lead to higher levels of SWB in older adults. The primary purpose of the present study was to test whether emotional intelligence would mediate the relationship between age and SWB. A total of 360 Chinese adults (age range: 20 to 79 years old) participated in this study. They filled out questionnaires that assessed their age, life satisfaction (The Satisfaction with Life Scale), affective well-being (The Positive and Negative Affect Schedule), and emotional intelligence (The Wong and Law Emotional Intelligence Scale). Using Structural Equation Modeling, the mediation model was supported, χ2 (75) = 194.21, p < .01; RMSEA = .07; CFI = .91. Emotional intelligence partially mediated the relationship between age and life satisfaction, and fully mediated the relationship between age and affective well-being. The findings suggest that older adults may use their increased emotional intelligence to enhance their SWB.
    Article · Jul 2016 · The International Journal of Aging and Human Development
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Two key theoretical frameworks that explain why people might hold biases for or against a specific age group—cultural stereotypes and in-group favoritism—yield distinct and sometimes contradictory predictions. This study proposes a combined framework drawing on these two theories and then tests hypotheses based on this framework in the workplace context. Using survey data from U.S. employees of two pharmaceutical companies, we evaluated the extent to which respondents attributed characteristics related to innovation or change and reliable performance to other workers based on perceived relative age (the age of the target relative to the age of the respondent). The hypotheses that our combined framework generated were supported, but the results varied by type of characteristic as well as by age of the respondent. We conclude that the combined framework is more predictive of age bias in the workplace than either individual framework alone.
    Article · Jul 2016 · The International Journal of Aging and Human Development
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Objectives: To develop a better understanding of the right to health in old age through the personal knowledge and experience of older persons and professionals in Israel. Methods: A qualitative research method was adopted based on focus groups. Information was collected through four focus groups with 33 participants. Results: Three main themes emerged: The first focused on the older persons' self-positioning vis-à-vis the health-care system. The second illustrated the verbal means chosen by the participants to situate the health-care system itself. The third elaborated on the institutional and cultural processes involved in upholding health rights in old age. Discussion: Future discussions regarding conceptualization of the right to health in old age should relate to its human aspects, that is, communication and interaction, and the older person's knowledge, participation, and involvement in shaping the medical services that they receive.
    Article · Jul 2016 · The International Journal of Aging and Human Development
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Preventing and reducing loneliness is crucial to well-being and good health. Social relationships protect people against loneliness. Friendship qualities like intimacy and frequency of contact may vary throughout a person's lifespan. This study explores aspects of friendship and loneliness among people in different age groups: 18 to 29, 30 to 49, 50 to 64, and 65 to 79 years old. Data are from the Norwegian Life Course, Gender and Generations study (N = 14,725). Young people see their friends most often. The proportion of people without confidant friends is higher among older age groups. However, older age groups report higher levels of satisfaction with their contact with friends. Multivariate regression analyses show that the aspiration for contact with friends is more significant to loneliness than actual contact in all age groups. Dissatisfaction with contact with friends is strongly related to loneliness in all age groups.
    Article · Jun 2016 · The International Journal of Aging and Human Development
  • Mignon A Montpetit · Stacey S Tiberio
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Objectives: The current study explores one way the process of resilience arises by investigating the underlying process of stress appraisal. In particular, the analyses examine how resilience resources function each day to attenuate the extent to which life experiences are perceived as threatening, and how trait-like resilience resources shape the appraisal process. Method: Daily diary and questionnaire data from 96 participants of Successful Aging in Context: The Macroenvironment and Daily Lived Experience (SAIC; MAge = 67 years, SDAge = 4.9 years; range: 58-86 years) were analyzed using multilevel random coefficient modeling to investigate how individuals' daily perceptions of control and self-esteem impacted perceived stress on a given day. Results: Results suggested that both self-esteem and environmental mastery help mitigate the experience of stress; furthermore, dispositional resilience and self-esteem stability predict differences between individuals in the extent to which self-esteem tempers the perception of stress each day. Discussion: The results inform theoretical and empirical work on the nature of resilience, especially regarding how the process arises in ordinary life. From an application perspective, results imply that augmenting environmental mastery and self-esteem, both of which are malleable, can facilitate resilience by helping elders challenge their perceptions of stress each day.
    Article · Jun 2016 · The International Journal of Aging and Human Development
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Purpose of the study: To clarify the construct of social usefulness by merging several influential theoretical perspectives on the findings of a qualitative investigation of late life prosociality. Design and methods: In-depth interviews with 20 older adults probed the meaning and psychological significance of the socially useful relationships they maintained with people and organizations. Results: Based on identity theory, the thematic analysis yielded nine classes and more than 100 distinct properties of social usefulness. Self-determination theory was employed to organize and interpret the findings in relation to older adults' needs for relatedness, autonomy, and competence. Implications: Also addressed are the study's implications for multidimensional measurement of social usefulness in future epidemiological and psychosocial studies.
    Article · Jun 2016 · The International Journal of Aging and Human Development
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Older employees are increasingly accepting bridge employment, which occurs when older workers take employment for pay after they retire from their main career. This study examined predictors of workers' decisions to engage in bridge employment versus full retirement and career employment. A national sample of 482 older people in the United States was surveyed regarding various work-related and nonwork related predictors of retirement decisions, and their retirement status was measured 5 years later. In bivariate analyses, both work-related variables (career goal achievement and experienced pressure to retire) and nonwork-related variables (psychological distress and traditional gender role orientation) predicted taking bridge employment, but in multinomial logistic regression, only nonwork variables had unique effects. Few predictors differentiated the bridge employed and fully retired groups. Nonwork variables were salient in making the decision to retire, and bridge employment may be conceptually more similar to full retirement than to career employment.
    Article · Jun 2016 · The International Journal of Aging and Human Development
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Older employees are increasingly accepting bridge employment, which occurs when older workers take employment for pay after they retire from their main career. This study examined predictors of workers’ decisions to engage in bridge employment versus full retirement and career employment. A national sample of 482 older people in the United States was surveyed regarding various work-related and nonwork related predictors of retirement decisions, and their retirement status was measured 5 years later. In bivariate analyses, both work-related variables (career goal achievement and experienced pressure to retire) and nonwork-related variables (psychological distress and traditional gender role orientation) predicted taking bridge employment, but in multinomial logistic regression, only nonwork variables had unique effects. Few predictors differentiated the bridge employed and fully retired groups. Nonwork variables were salient in making the decision to retire, and bridge employment may be conceptually more similar to full retirement than to career employment.
    Article · Jun 2016 · The International Journal of Aging and Human Development
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Objective: This study explored ballroom dance as serious leisure and successful aging in a sample of community-dwelling older adults. Methods: Qualitative procedures were used to explore stories of ballroom dance and successful aging. Results: Participants described positive successful aging and active leisure engagement. Three themes emerged from thematic analyses: (a) Ballroom Dance as Serious Leisure: Its Dimensions; (b) Ballroom Dance: Its Link to Successful Aging; (c) The Affinity: We Love to Dance!. Conclusion: The participants' ballroom dance revealed serious leisure characteristics in conjunction with their successful aging. They loved to dance, self-identified as ballroom dancers, and orchestrated their dance activities within its social world. Future research should examine the relation of successful aging to the social world of ballroom dance.
    Article · Jun 2016 · The International Journal of Aging and Human Development
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Promoting health and well-being among individuals of advancing age is a significant issue due to increased incidence of cancer among older adults. This study demonstrates the benefits of expecting positive outcomes and participating in volunteer activities among older adults with cancer. We used a nationally representative sample of 2,670 individuals who have experienced cancer from the 2008 wave of the Health and Retirement Study. We constructed a structural equation model to explore the associations of optimism, volunteerism, life satisfaction, and psychological well-being. The level of optimism was a significant predictor of volunteerism, which in turn affected life satisfaction and psychological well-being. The level of engagement in volunteer activities was found to have significant path coefficients toward both life satisfaction and psychological well-being. Our study provides evidence that older adults who have experienced cancer and maintained a positive outlook on their lives and engaged in personally meaningful activities tended to experience psychological well-being and life satisfaction.
    Article · Jun 2016 · The International Journal of Aging and Human Development
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: This study examines the influences of employment status and the moderating role of daily stressors on cortisol levels and responsivity in 182 workers and 253 retirees between 55 and 75 years old from the National Survey of Midlife Development in the United States (MIDUS-II). As a part of the Daily Diary Study, participants completed telephone interviews about their daily experiences across eight evenings and provided saliva samples across 4 days. Multilevel models showed that workers who experienced greater number of non–work related daily stressors significantly exhibited higher cortisol level at 30 min post awakening (b = 0.252, SE = 0.109, p < .05) and greater cortisol awakening response (b = 3.769, SE = 1.898, p < .05) the following morning as compared with retirees who experienced similar amount of daily stressors. Findings demonstrate the important consideration of daily stressors in identifying the ways in which social roles influence physiological functioning in midlife and late adulthood.
    Article · Jun 2016 · The International Journal of Aging and Human Development