The International Journal of Aging and Human Development (INT J AGING HUM DEV)

Publisher: Baywood Publishing

Journal description

Under what conditions does "development" end? Under what conditions does "aging" begin? Can these conditions themselves be modified by intervention at the psychological, social, or biological levels? To what extent are patterns of development and aging attributable to biological factors? To psychological factors? How can the social and behavioral sciences contribute to the actualization of human potential throughout the entire life span? What are the implications of gerontological research for our understanding of the total development of human organism? These are some of the broad questions with which the International Journal of Aging and Human Development is concerned. Emphasis is upon psychological and social studies of aging and the aged. However, the Journal also publishes research that introduces observations from other fields that illuminate the "human" side of gerontology, or utilizes gerontological observations to illuminate in other fields.

Current impact factor: 0.62

Impact Factor Rankings

2016 Impact Factor Available summer 2017
2009 Impact Factor 0.582

Additional details

5-year impact 1.14
Cited half-life >10.0
Immediacy index 0.03
Eigenfactor 0.00
Article influence 0.42
Website International Journal of Aging and Human Development, The website
Other titles International journal of aging & human development, International journal of aging and human development
ISSN 0091-4150
OCLC 1788134
Material type Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Journal / Magazine / Newspaper, Internet Resource

Publisher details

Baywood Publishing

  • Pre-print
    • Archiving status unclear
  • Post-print
    • Author cannot archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be deposited in open access repositories
    • Can be deposited in password protected repositories only, subject to permission, 12 month embargo and restrictions
    • Password protected repositories must use the publisher's version/PDF
    • Publisher last contacted on 03/06/2014
  • Classification
    white

Publications in this journal

  • Alissa Dark-Freudeman · Robin L West
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The present study identified middle-aged (ages 40-64) and older individuals (ages 65-90) who reported a highly important possible self related to health. The relationship between age, physical health, health efficacy, and psychological well-being were examined among these individuals. We tested a model in which health efficacy predicted both positive and negative psychological well-being. For both age groups, self-reported health predicted health self-efficacy; however, the direct effects of health efficacy on both positive and negative psychological well-being were also significant. Higher levels of health efficacy were associated with higher levels of positive psychological well-being and lower levels of negative well-being, as predicted. Physical health indirectly predicted well-being through its impact on health self-efficacy for middle-aged and older individuals who valued their health highly. Overall, these results support the notion that health efficacy related to a most important health self is a predictor of psychological well-being in mid and late life.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · The International Journal of Aging and Human Development
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Social support and mastery can protect against psychological distress in late life, carrying implications for theory and intervention. However, some groups have not been well studied, with African Americans receiving less empirical attention, especially in regard to their satisfaction with social support. In this study, samples of African American and White American community-dwelling older adults reported their perceived mastery, degree of psychological distress, and social support. A model investigating the separate relationships of these variables by race explained significantly more variance than a model for all participants combined. For both groups, mastery was significantly associated with lower psychological distress. However, among White Americans, social support was significantly associated with lower distress, while among African Americans, there was no relationship between satisfaction with social support and distress. The findings indicate that social support and mastery are important variables to consider in their relationship to psychological distress in later life and that diverse racial groups may display differing relationships among these variables.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · The International Journal of Aging and Human Development
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Custodial grandparents raising grandchildren experience intense levels of stress that can lead to depression and other forms of psychological distress. Drawing on a coping model of family stress, adjustment, and adaptation, we explored the relationship between depression and mental health quality of life mediated by social support and moderated by grandparent's age. The sample consisted of 667 African American custodial grandmothers, dichotomized into two age groupings, ≤55 (n = 306) and 55 + (n = 361). All grandmothers participated in a 12-month support intervention. The prospective analysis revealed social support was a mediator in the association between depressive symptoms and mental health quality of life for older African American grandmothers; however, this same relationship did not hold for their younger counterparts. Study limitations and future research directions are discussed.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · The International Journal of Aging and Human Development
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The present research examined the effect of encoding from multiple viewpoints on scene recall in a group of younger (18-22 years) and older (65-80 years) adults. Participants completed a visual search task, during which they were given the opportunity to examine a room using two sets of windows that partitioned the room differently. Their choice of window set was recorded, to determine whether an association between these choices and spatial memory performance existed. Subsequently, participants were tested for spatial memory of the domain in which the search task was completed. Relative to younger adults, older adults demonstrated an increased tendency to use a single set of windows as well as decreased spatial memory for the domain. Window-set usage was associated with spatial memory, such that older adults who relied more heavily on a single set of windows also had better performance on the spatial memory task. These findings suggest that, in older adults, moderation in exploratory behavior may have a positive effect on memory for the domain of exploration.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · The International Journal of Aging and Human Development
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Social capital has been connected with positive health outcomes across countries, including China. Given the rise in the number of seniors living alone, there is a need to examine the health benefits of social capital, accounting for living arrangements. Data from the 2005 Chinese General Social Survey were used to test research hypotheses. Controlling for demographics, elders living alone possessed similar level of social capital compared with elders living with others. While bonding and linking social capital were significant factors in urban areas and linking social capital was a significant factor in rural areas, the relationship between living alone and health did not differ based on the level of social capital possession. When the traditional intergenerational living arrangement has not been a valid option for many older adults in China, seeking new way of family caring, and developing appropriate social and institutional structures to assist elders living alone, becomes critical.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · The International Journal of Aging and Human Development
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: As the proportion of elders in developing nations increases and the ability of families to meet their needs is stretched thin, the risk of elder abuse will grow. This study examined the types and nature of abuse and neglect from the perspective of elders in Ethiopia who experienced abuse in noninstitutional settings. A qualitative design guided by hermeneutic phenomenology was used to explore the lived experiences of abuse and neglect of 15 Ethiopian elders. Nine women and six men ranging in age from 64 to 93 years were interviewed. Most were victims of multiple forms of abuse, especially financial exploitation, emotional abuse, and neglect. Economic vulnerability was a clear underlying factor contributing to elders' risk for encountering abuse. Effective prevention efforts must address the societal level factors that ultimately contribute to elder abuse while also holding individuals responsible for their harmful behaviors against elders.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · The International Journal of Aging and Human Development
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Few resources are available to help grandmother caregivers to grandchildren manage their complex family situations that may have immediate and long-term consequences for themselves and their families. Resourcefulness training is an intervention designed to help grandmothers improve their ability to deal with these problems. The purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate the necessity, feasibility, acceptability, fidelity, safety, and effectiveness (i.e., effect sizes) of an online, computer-based resourcefulness training intervention that was adapted from a face-to-face intervention. Twelve grandmothers raising or living with grandchildren participated in the pilot intervention that included (a) watching an instructional video on resourcefulness, (b) completing two online questionnaires over a 6-week time period, and (c) writing in an online journal every day for 4 weeks. Data are evaluated within the context of the six parameters important to intervention development. Qualitative and quantitative results provide initial support for all six parameters. Recommendations to improve aspects of the intervention are discussed.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · The International Journal of Aging and Human Development
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The late-life developmental process of self-transcendence shapes elders' perspectives on self, others, the nature of this world, and of a dimension beyond the here and now. This qualitative pilot study evaluated the Psychoeducational Approach to Transcendence and Health (PATH) Program, a psychoeducational intervention to promote self-transcendence and well-being in community-dwelling women at a senior center. The intervention involved eight weekly group sessions using group processes, mindfulness practices, creative experiences, and independent at-home practice. The findings supported the underlying theory-based structure and content of the intervention and indicated the intervention may empower elders to attend to self-care, develop acceptance, and learn new skills associated with health and well-being, thus merits further study. Based on insights gained from facilitators' and participants' experiences and perceptions, the intervention will be revised and strengthened.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · The International Journal of Aging and Human Development
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Mid- and later-life parental transitions to the "empty nest" are characterized by increasing complexity, uncertainty, and variability. Drawing upon a life course perspective coupled with a sociocultural stress model, this mixed-methods study focuses on parental perceptions of anticipated emotional challenge associated with their children's homeleaving and how this is shaped by ethnic culture and other family-related factors. Data entail a subsample of 174 midlife parents (mean age = 51.8) with at least one adult child aged 18 to 35 living at home, collected as part of the "Mid/Later Life Parenting Project." Study participants belonged to British-, Chinese-, Southern European-, or South-Asian groups living in Metro Vancouver, BC. Analyses indicate that societal and ethnic group norms, relationship quality, and living arrangement preferences, as well as supportive exchanges and economic constraints (e.g., housing costs) influence empty nest perceptions and pathways. Implications of these findings are applied to aging families and family development.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · The International Journal of Aging and Human Development
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This study examines the role of mother's health and socioeconomic status on daughter's self-rated health using data spanning three decades from the National Longitudinal Surveys of Mature Women and Young Women (N = 1,848 matched mother-daughter pairs; 1,201 White and 647 African American). Using nested growth curve models, we investigated whether mother's self-rated health affected the daughter's self-rated health and whether socioeconomic status mediated this relationship. Mother's health significantly influenced daughters' self-rated health, but the findings were mediated by mother's socioeconomic status. African American daughters reported lower self-rated health and experienced more decline over time compared with White daughters, accounting for mother's and daughter's covariates. Our findings reveal maternal health and resources as a significant predictor of daughters' self-rated health and confirm the role of socioeconomic status and racial disparities over time.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · The International Journal of Aging and Human Development
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: While stereotypes about gender, race, and age (particularly old age) have been studied independently, few have examined the content of compound stereotypes that consider the intersection of gender, race, and age. Using a within-subjects design, we examined stereotypes as a function of target gender (male, female), race (Black, White), and age across the life span (adolescent, young adult, middle-aged, young-old, and old-old). Participants rated 20 target groups on 10 attributes representative of either an agentic (e.g., ambitious) or communal (e.g., considerate) orientation. Participants were presented only with categorical information (e.g., Black, 85-year-old, males), and ordering of categorical information and target groups was counterbalanced across participants. We hypothesized differential effects of target gender and race as a function of age. Multivariate analyses of variance on each attribute revealed significant main effects that supported traditional stereotype research, but significant interactions revealed a more complicated picture. Overall, results showed that while gender stereotypes about agency and communion generally hold up across the life span, they are more applicable to White than Black targets. Results also supported the notion that we hold unique stereotypes based on multiple social categories rather than simply perceiving one social category as more salient than another, which was best exemplified in the case of Black female targets that were less likely to be perceived in gender stereotypic ways across the life span. We suggest stereotype research needs to shift to accommodate for the complexity and diversity of real people.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · The International Journal of Aging and Human Development
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The cost and prevalence of chronic health conditions increase in late life and can negatively impact accumulated wealth. Based on the financial challenges midaged and older adults face, we sought to understand the evolution of distinctive sequences of chronic health conditions and how these sequences affect retirement savings. We used 10 waves of the Health and Retirement Study and tracked the health states and changes in wealth of 5,540 individuals. We identified five typical sequences of chronic health conditions, which are defined as follows: Multimorbidity, Comorbidity, Mild Disease, Late Event, and No Disease. Wealth accumulation differed across the five sequences. Multimorbidity and Comorbidity were the most costly sequences. Individuals with these health patterns, respectively, had $91,205 and $95,140, less net worth than respondents identified with No Disease. Our findings suggest policy makers consider sequential disease patterns when planning for the health-care needs and expenditures of older Americans.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · The International Journal of Aging and Human Development
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Rates of functional limitations are consistently higher for women than for men, but it is not clear why. While some studies have examined individual risk factors, others have turned to broader social characteristics. We examined the effects of both individual and neighborhood characteristics associated with the functional limitations of older men and women. Multilevel structural equation models were developed using data from a random digit dial sample of 5,688 adults aged 50 to 74 years living in New Jersey. We found that greater numbers of fast-food restaurants, storefronts, and supermarkets was associated with more functional limitations of women, while greater numbers of fast-food restaurants was the only neighborhood characteristic associated with more functional limitations of men. Functional limitations of women, but not men, are affected by multiple neighborhood characteristics. This research reveals that specific neighborhood contextual characteristics, not just poverty, are associated with the health of community-dwelling adults.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · The International Journal of Aging and Human Development

  • No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · The International Journal of Aging and Human Development
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The careful examination of factors influencing bridge employment among retired police officers is largely absent in the literature. Two hundred and eleven retired police officers participated in a survey exploring factors that contributed to the participation in bridge employment or employment upon retiring from primary careers in law enforcement. The results indicate that retired officers who held part-time positions while fully employed as police officers were more likely to participate in bridge employment when compared with individuals who did not hold additional part-time employment while fully employed as police officers. Opportunities for training and interventions exist to help retired police officers navigate the working transition at this later-life juncture.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · The International Journal of Aging and Human Development

  • No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · The International Journal of Aging and Human Development