The Physician and sportsmedicine

Journal description

The Physician and Sportsmedicine is a peer-reviewed monthly journal serving the practicing physician's professional and personal interests in the medical aspects of exercise, sports, and fitness. The most widely read clinical sports medicine journal in the world, we cover practical, primary care-oriented topics such as diagnosing and treating knee and ankle injuries, managing chronic disease, preventing and managing overuse injuries, helping patients lose weight safely, and all manner of exercise and nutrition topics.

Current impact factor: 1.09

Impact Factor Rankings

2016 Impact Factor Available summer 2017
2014 / 2015 Impact Factor 1.085
2013 Impact Factor 1.49
2012 Impact Factor 1.344
2011 Impact Factor 1.023
2008 Impact Factor 0.2
2007 Impact Factor 0.2
2006 Impact Factor 0.322
2005 Impact Factor 0.38
2004 Impact Factor 0.339
2003 Impact Factor 0.322
2002 Impact Factor 0.492
2001 Impact Factor 0.399
2000 Impact Factor 0.318
1999 Impact Factor 0.259
1998 Impact Factor 0.236
1997 Impact Factor 0.239

Impact factor over time

Impact factor
Year

Additional details

5-year impact 1.40
Cited half-life 6.40
Immediacy index 0.07
Eigenfactor 0.00
Article influence 0.46
Website Physician and Sportsmedicine Online, The website
Other titles Physician and sportsmedicine, Physician and sports medicine, Sportsmedicine, Sports medicine
ISSN 0091-3847
OCLC 1787159
Material type Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Journal / Magazine / Newspaper, Internet Resource

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Objective: Pediatric sports medicine is an evolving pediatric subspecialty. No workforce data currently exists describing the current state of pediatric sports medicine. The goal of this survey is to contribute information to the practicing pediatric sports medicine specialist, employers and other stakeholders regarding the current state of pediatric sports medicine. Methods: The Workforce Survey was conducted by the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) Division of Workforce and Medical Education Policy (WMEP) and included a 44-item standard questionnaire online addressing training, clinical practice and demographic characteristics as well as the 24-item AAP Council on Sports Medicine and Fitness (COSMF) questionnaire. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize all survey responses. Bivariate relationships were tested for statistical significance using Chi square. Results: 145 surveys were returned, which represented a 52.7% response rate for eligible COSMF members and board certified non-council responders. The most common site of employment among respondents was university-based clinics. The respondents board certified in sports medicine were significantly more likely to perform fracture management, casting and splinting, neuropsychological testing and injections compared to those not board certified in sports medicine. A large proportion of respondents held an academic/medical school appointment. Increases were noted in both patient volume and the complexity of the injuries the specialists were treating. Conclusion: This pediatric sports medicine workforce study provides previously unappreciated insight into practice arrangements, weekly duties, procedures, number of patients seen, referral patterns, and potential future trends of the pediatric sports medicine specialist.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · The Physician and sportsmedicine
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives: Altering body weight can have substantial effects on an athlete's performance and well-being. Limited information is available describing the weight control practices of Division I National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) athletes. Methods: Weight control practices data from 188 (138 male and 50 female; 18-23 y) Division I NCAA athletes were analyzed as a part of this cross-sectional, retrospective study. Participants completed questionnaires on weight control practices and weight control nutrition knowledge at the end of their season and were classified into weight-sensitive and less weight-sensitive sports. Results: A higher proportion of females attempted to lose weight than males among less weight-sensitive sports (61% vs. 22%, chi-square = 15.8, p < 0.001). However, the prevalence of weight loss attempts was not different between females and males among weight-sensitive sports (50% vs. 60%, chi-square = 0.5, p = 0.479). The prevalence of weight gain attempts differed by gender for less weight-sensitive sports (65% vs. 4% for males and females, chi-square = 33.5, p < 0.001) but not weight-sensitive sports (24% vs. 9% for males and females, chi-square = 2.1, p = 0.146). Weight control knowledge did not differ between participants attempting versus not attempting to lose weight (Mann-Whitney U = 3340, z = -1.37, p = 0.17). Common maladaptive behaviors used to lose weight included skipping meals and exercising more than usual. Conclusion: Weight loss attempts are common among Division I NCAA athletes, and the differences between males and females may be more pronounced among less weight-sensitive sports. Weight gain attempts are more common in select male sports.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · The Physician and sportsmedicine
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives: This study aimed to examine the physical and physiological demands of basketball refereeing. Methods: 16 elite-level basketball referees were studied during U-19 basketball games (n=8) for time-motion analyses, exercise heart rates (HR) and blood lactate concentration [La]. Game activities were considered as time spent and distance covered in five locomotors activities (standing, walking, jogging, running and sprinting). Results: Referees spent more time (p<0.01) walking (63.72±2.02 min) than jogging (3.10±0.29 min), running (4.24±0.46 min) and sprinting (1.69±0.24 min). Referees covered more distance (p< 0.01) walking than jogging, running and sprinting across the quarters (Q). Mean HR (74.89±6.86 %HRmax) was not significantly different across the game Q (Q1 to Q4) and halves. [La] did not show significant changes (p=0.221) when comparing the half-time (4.30±3.92 mmol.L(-1)) and the end of the game (6.70±4.90 mmol.L(-1)). Conclusion: In light of this study, we conclude that U-19 basketball refereeing is a moderate intensity activity where referees spent 81% of total game time at low-intensity with bouts of high-intensity activities throughout the game.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · The Physician and sportsmedicine
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Soccer is among the most popular youth sports with over 3 million youth players registered in the U.S. Soccer is unique in that players intentionally use their head to strike the ball, leading to concerns that heading could cause acute or chronic brain injury, especially in the immature brains of children. Methods: Pub Med search without date restriction was conducted in November 2014 and August 2015 using the terms soccer and concussion, heading and concussion, and youth soccer and concussion. 310 articles were identified and reviewed for applicable content specifically relating to youth athletes, heading, and/or acute or chronic brain injury from soccer. Results: Soccer is a low-risk sport for catastrophic head injury, but concussions are relatively common and heading often plays a role. At all levels of play, concussions are more likely to occur in the act of heading than with other facets of the game. While concussion from heading the ball without other contact to the head appears rare in adult players, some data suggests children are more susceptible to concussion from heading primarily in game situations. Contributing factors include biomechanical forces, less developed technique, and the immature brain's susceptibility to injury. Conclusions: There is no evidence that heading in youth soccer causes any permanent brain injury and there is limited evidence that heading in youth soccer can cause concussion. A reasonable approach based on U.S. Youth Soccer recommendations is to teach heading after age 10 in controlled settings, and heading in games should be delayed until skill acquisition and physical maturity allow the youth player to head correctly with confidence.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · The Physician and sportsmedicine
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    ABSTRACT: Head injuries are a major concern for physicians in athletes of all ages. Specifically, sports-related concussions are becoming an all-too-common injury among female athletes. The incidence of concussions among female athletes has likely increased over the past few decades because of an increase in sports participation afforded by Title IX. It would be useful for physicians to have general knowledge of concussions and their potential sex-related differences. This review article summarizes the current body of research concerning sex-related differences in concussion epidemiology and outcomes. A literature search was performed using PubMed and included all articles published from 1993 to present, with a predominant focus on research conducted over the past fifteen years. Additional articles were found using the bibliography from articles found through the PubMed search. Several articles have compared incidence, severity of neurological deficit, constellation of symptoms, and length of recovery post-concussion in males and females. However, the literature does not unanimously support a significant sex-related difference in concussions. Lack of consensus in the literature can be attributed to differences between patient populations, different tools used to study concussions, including subjective or objective measures, and differences in mechanisms of injury. We conclude that concussions are a serious injury in both male and female athletes, and physicians should have a very high index of suspicion regardless of sex, because there currently is not sufficient consensus in the literature to institute sex-related changes to concussion management. Current research may suggest a sex-related difference pertaining to sports-related concussions, but further evaluation is needed on this topic.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · The Physician and sportsmedicine

  • No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · The Physician and sportsmedicine
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this systematic review is to summarise the results of cohort studies that examined the incidence of SCD in marathons and to assess the quality of the methods used. A search of the PROSPERO international database revealed no prospective or published systematic reviews investigating SCD in marathons. The review was conducted using studies that reported and characterised the incidence of SCD in people participating in marathons. Studies were identified via electronic database searches (Medline, CINAHL, SPORTDiscus and Google Scholar) from January 1, 1966 to October 1, 2014 and through manual literature searches. 7 studies met the inclusion criteria and were included in this review. 6 of the studies were conducted in the USA and 1 in the UK. These studies covered a 34-year period involving between 215,413 and 3,949,000 runners. The SCD of between 4 and 28 people are recorded in the papers and the reported estimates of the incidence of SCD in marathons ranged widely from 0.6 to 1.9 per 100,000 runners. The proportion of those suffering SCD who were male ranged from 57.1% to 100% and the mean age reported in the papers, ranged from 37 to 48. This review raises 4 methodological concerns over i) collating reports of SCD in marathons; ii) time of death in relation to the marathon; iii) the use of registrants rather than runners in the estimates of sample size and iv) limited detail on runners exercise history. These four concerns all threaten the reliability and interpretation of any estimate of SCD incidence rates in marathons. This review recommends that the methods used to collect data on SCD in marathons be improved and that a central reporting system be established.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · The Physician and sportsmedicine
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives: In 2010, there were 2.5 million hospitalizations, emergency room visits, or deaths associated with concussions in the United States.[1] Knowledge deficits exist among physicians regarding concussion management, which can lead to severe repercussions, including poor patient outcomes, poor patient satisfaction, and potential medical-legal issues. While concussion is a prevalent condition evaluated in the medical field, medical students continue to have a knowledge deficit regarding concussion diagnosis, prognosis, medical management, and return to play guidelines. Methods: Medical students from a mid-western medical school completed a survey on concussion diagnosis, prognosis, medical management, and return to play guidelines. Results: The response rate was 40%. The data suggests that the vast majority of medical students are able to define concussion; however, most reported never having a lecture dedicated to concussion during medical school and also lacked clinical experience with acute concussion and post-concussive syndrome. There are clear areas of deficiency as noted by the inability of students to correctly identify symptoms and appropriate management of concussion. Conclusion: The current study indicates that at an individual, mid-western, top 50 medical school, current medical trainees may not be adequately educated to identify and manage concussion. Future research is warranted to determine the optimal guidelines to educate future physicians as it pertains to concussion diagnosis, management, prognosis, and return to play guidelines.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · The Physician and sportsmedicine
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives: Homocysteine (Hcy) has emerged as a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases (CVD). However the relationship of physical activity (PA) with Hcy levels in the elderly is controversial. Accordingly, the current study examined the effect of low and high participation in PA on serum Hcy in young (n = 77; 18-50 years) and old (n = 207; > 65 years) males (n = 141) and females (n = 142). Methods: Level of PA was obtained in a 1-to-1 interview and participants divided into low and high groups. Serum Hcy, folate, and vitamin B12 were obtained after 12 hour fast drawn by venipuncture. Results: Levels of Hcy correlated with folate (r = -0. 5; p = 0.000) and vitamin B12 (r = -0.3; p = 0.000). The ANOVA revealed a main effect of PA for Hcy (p = 0.04) but not for folate (p = 0.2) and vitamin B12 (p = 0.2). Main effects were found also of age for Hcy (p = 0.000) and folate (p = 0.005) as well as of gender for Hcy (p = 0.000) and vitamin B12 (p = 0.000). Subsequent ANCOVA showed lower levels of Hcy in the participants with greater versus lower PA even after controlling for B12 vitamin. Conclusion: These results confirm the importance of the vitamins for regulating Hcy levels. Additionally, the data suggests that PA affects Hcy levels without affecting and independent of B vitamins in the elderly.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · The Physician and sportsmedicine
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives: There is an epidemic of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries in youth athletes. Poor neuromuscular control is an easily modifiable risk factor for ACL injury, and can be screened for by observing dynamic knee valgus on landing in a drop vertical jump test. This study aims to validate a simple, clinically useful population-based screening test to identify at-risk athletes prior to participation in organized sports. We hypothesized that both physicians and allied health professionals would be accurate in subjectively assessing injury risk in real-time field and office conditions without motion analysis data and would be in agreement with each other. Methods: We evaluated the inter-rater reliability of risk assessment by various observer groups, including physicians and allied health professionals, commonly involved in the care of youth athletes. Fifteen athletes age 11-17 were filmed performing a drop vertical jump test. These videos were viewed by 242 observers including orthopaedic surgeons, orthopaedic residents/fellows, coaches, athletic trainers (ATCs), and physical therapists (PTs), with the observer asked to subjectively estimate the risk level of each jumper. Objective injury risk was calculated using normalized knee separation distance (measured using Dartfish, Alpharetta, GA), based on previously published studies. Risk assessments by observers were compared to each other to determine inter-rater reliability, and to the objectively calculated risk level to determine sensitivity and specificity. Seventy one observers repeated the test at a minimum of 6 weeks later to determine intra-rater reliability. Results: Between groups, the inter-rater reliability was high, κ = 0.92 (95% CI 0.829-0.969, p<0.05), indicating that no single group gave better (or worse) assessments, including comparisons between physicians and allied health professionals. With a screening cutoff isolated to subjects identified by observers as "high risk", the sensitivity was 63.06% and specificity 82.81%. Reducing the screening cutoff to also include jumpers identified as "medium risk" increased sensitivity to 95.04% and decreased the specificity to 46.07%. Intra-rater reliability was moderate, κ = 0.55 (95% CI 0.49-0.61, p<0.05), indicating that individual observers made reproducible risk assessments. Conclusions: This study supports the use of a simple, field-based observational drop vertical jump screening test to identify athletes at risk for ACL injury. Our study shows good inter- and intra-rater reliability and high sensitivity and suggests that screening can be performed without significant training by physicians as well as allied health professionals, including: coaches, athletic trainers and physical therapists. Identification of these high-risk athletes may play a role in enrollment in appropriate preventative neuromuscular training programs, which have been shown to decrease the incidence of ACL injuries in this population.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · The Physician and sportsmedicine
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    ABSTRACT: Introduction: The optimal surgical technique for a distal biceps tendon rupture repair still remains controversial. Current biomechanical evidence shows Endobutton fixation to have the highest load-to-failure testing, but clinical results of this is limited. The purpose of this study was to compare patient-oriented functional outcome between a modified Boyd-Anderson two-incision technique and repair with a single-incision Endobutton technique. Methods: All patients who underwent distal biceps tendon repair with a two-incision or Endobutton technique between 2000 and 2010 with two-year follow-up at our institution were identified. Their clinical, operative, and follow-up data was collected and analyzed. The primary outcome was a patient-oriented functional outcome measure (Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand: DASH). Secondary outcomes were evaluated using a subjective questionnaire. Results: Thirty-three patients were repaired with the two-incision technique and twenty-five patients had a repair with a single incision Endobutton technique. All patients receiving the two-incision repair were male, while there were 2 females who had an Endobutton procedure. There was no significant difference between the two-incision and the Endobutton groups in regards to mean DASH score (6.31 versus 5.91, p = 0.697), mean Work DASH score (10.49 versus 0.93, p = 0.166), and mean Sports DASH score (10.54 versus 9.56, p = 0.987). Regardless of technique, most patients were "extremely satisfied" (n = 42, or 72.41%) or "satisfied" (n = 10, or 17.24%) postoperatively, and returned to pre-operative activity in approximately 6 months (6.87 months versus 6.82 months, respectively) (p=0.457). There was no significant difference in the prevalence of complications (39.39% versus 32.0%, respectively for two incision versus single incision) (p=0.594). Conclusion: Patients from both surgical groups were satisfied with their post-operative function and had similar functional outcomes and complication rates. Both surgical techniques for distal biceps tendon repair are effective and are similarly safe methods of treatment.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · The Physician and sportsmedicine
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    ABSTRACT: A fully functioning, painless shoulder joint is essential to maintain a healthy, normal quality of life. Disease of the rotator cuff tendons (RCTs) is a common issue that affects the population, increasing with age, and can lead to significant disability and social and health costs. RCT injuries can affect younger, healthy patients and the elderly alike, and may be the result of trauma or occur as a result of chronic degeneration. They can be acutely painful, limited to certain activities or completely asymptomatic and incidental findings. A wide variety of treatment options exists ranging from conservative local and systemic pain modalities, to surgical fixation. Regardless of management ultimately chosen, physiotherapy of the RCT, rotator cuff muscles and surrounding shoulder girdle plays an essential role in proper treatment. Length of treatment, types of therapy and timing may vary if therapy is definitive care or part of a postoperative protocol. Allowing time for adequate RCT healing must always be considered when implementing ROM and strengthening after surgery. With current rehabilitation methods, patients with all spectrums of RCT pathology can improve their function, pain and quality of life. This manuscript reviews current theories and practice involving rehabilitation for RCT injuries.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · The Physician and sportsmedicine
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: Kendo is a Japanese martial art analogous to fencing, which is becoming increasingly popular worldwide. The large number of participants creates a need to assess injury patterns to better train them. The purpose of this study is to describe current injury rates in kendo and compare these rates to other martial arts. Methods: This retrospective study used an online questionnaire sent to 500 active members of the All United States Kendo Federation and World Kendo Federation. The questionnaire, based on the NCAA Injury Surveillance System, contains questions regarding location and type of injuries sustained during competition and practice, time lost to training, and competitor demographics. Statistical analyses between competitor demographics and injury rates are provided. Injury rates are expressed as injury rates/minute of competition or practice and by athlete exposures. 95% CIs were calculated. Results: Responses from 307 of 500 kendo players were received (response rate = 61.4%). 41 (18%) male and 13 (16%) female participants reported injury to only one body region, while 16 (7%) men and one (1%) woman reported no injuries. 166 (74%) males and 70 (83%) females reported injuries to two or more body regions. The most common sites of injury involved the foot/ankle (65.1%), wrist/hand (53.5%) and elbow/forearm (48.8%). Most injuries occurred during practice (87.9% foot/ankle, 89.9% wrist/hand, elbow/forearm 92.2%). The most common injuries were contusions, abrasions, and sprains/strains. Injury rates were 121/1000 A-E (0.025 injuries/min) in tournaments versus 20.5/1000 A-E (0.011 injuries/min) in training. 26% of injuries resulted in time off of participation, with an average recovery time of 15 days (range = 1 day-1 year). Conclusions: Although more total injuries occurred in practice than in competition, there was a lower injury rate in kendo than in taekwondo and western-style fencing. This study demonstrates that kendo is a relatively safe sport compared to other martial arts sports.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · The Physician and sportsmedicine
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    ABSTRACT: Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries are relatively common and can lead to knee dysfunction. The classic presentation is a non-contact twisting injury with an audible pop and the rapid onset of swelling. Prompt evaluation and diagnosis of ACL injuries are important. Acute treatment consists of cessation of the sporting activity, ice, compression, and elevation with evaluation by a physician familiar with ACL injuries and their management. The diagnosis is made with the use of patient history and physical examination as well as imaging studies. Radiographs may show evidence of a bony injury. MRI confirms the diagnosis and evaluates the knee for concomitant injuries to the cartilage, menisci and other knee ligaments. For active patients, operative treatment is often recommended while less-active patients may not require surgery. The goal of this review is to discuss the diagnosis of an ACL injury and provide clear management strategies for the primary-care sports medicine physician.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · The Physician and sportsmedicine
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: Coverage of high school football by orthopedic sports medicine specialists is considered standard of care in many localities. Determining the economic viability of this endeavor has never been investigated. The primary purpose of the present investigation was to perform an economic analysis of local high school sports coverage by an orthopedic sports medicine practice. Methods: From January 2010 to June 2012, a prospective injury report database was used to collect sports injuries from five high school athletic programs covered by a single, private orthopedic sports medicine practice. Patients referred for orthopedic care were then tracked to determine expected cost of care (potential revenue). Evaluation and management codes and current procedure terminology codes were obtained to determine the value of physician visits and surgical care rendered. Overhead costs were calculated based on historical rates within our practice and incorporated to determine estimated profit. Results: 19,165 athletic trainer contacts with athletes playing all sports, including both those 'on-field' and in the training room, resulted in 473 (2.5%) physician referrals. The covering orthopedic practice handled 89 (27.9%) of the orthopedic referrals. Of orthopedic physician referrals, 26 (5.4%) required orthopedic surgical treatment. The covering team practice handled 17/26 (65%) surgical cases. The total revenue collected by the covering team practice was $26,226.14. The overhead cost of treatment was $9441.41. Overall estimated profit of orthopedic visits and treatment during this period for the covering practice was $16,784.73. Conclusions: The covering team practice handled 28% of the orthopedic referrals, 65% of the surgical cases and captured 59% of the potential profit. An increase in physician referrals could increase the benefit for orthopedic surgeons.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · The Physician and sportsmedicine