Alcohol health and research world (Alcohol Health Res World)

Publisher: National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (U.S.); United States. Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Mental Health Administration; National Institutes of Health (U.S.)

Journal description

Discontinued in 1998. Continued by Alcohol Research & Health (1535-7414).

Current impact factor: 0.00

Impact Factor Rankings

Additional details

5-year impact 0.00
Cited half-life 0.00
Immediacy index 0.00
Eigenfactor 0.00
Article influence 0.00
Website Alcohol Health & Research World website
Other titles Alcohol health and research world, Alcohol health & research world
ISSN 0090-838X
OCLC 1785965
Material type Government publication, National government publication, Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Journal / Magazine / Newspaper, Internet Resource

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Policy measures intended to control alcohol use and related problems have seldom been specifically targeted toward the entire group of young people between the ages of 18 and 25. Research evaluating these policies also tends not to focus on the 18-25 age group but, rather, on 18- to 20-year-olds or the adult population as a whole. Furthermore, some studies of alcohol control policies are cross-sectional and thus can offer only tentative information about the causes of results observed. Despite these limitations, the current literature does offer evidence for the effectiveness of particular alcohol control measures deserving of trials and further study among young adults. These measures affect the availability of alcohol, social messages about alcohol, and enforcement of current laws.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2005 · Alcohol health and research world

  • No preview · Article · Jan 2005 · Alcohol health and research world
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    ABSTRACT: People's alcohol use and abuse tend to increase, peak, and then decrease as they go through the transition to adulthood, a period that spans the late teenage years through the mid- to late twenties. However, more specific pathways, or trajectories, of alcohol use are embedded within the normative alcohol use pathway. Studying these trajectories of alcohol use can elucidate the origins and consequences of alcohol problems as well as guide prevention and treatment programs. Models of the average trend (i.e., normative trajectory approaches) are simpler than models that posit multiple trajectories and may replicate more consistently across samples and age spans. However, multiple-trajectory approaches allow for a more specific understanding of the origins, developmental course, and outcomes of alcohol use and abuse among adolescents and young adults.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2005 · Alcohol health and research world

  • No preview · Article · Jan 2004 · Alcohol health and research world
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    ABSTRACT: Women are more vulnerable than men to many of the medical consequences of alcohol use. Although research has shown that male alcoholics generally have smaller brain volumes than nonalcoholic males, the few studies that have compared brain structure in alcoholic men and women have had mixed results. To adequately compare brain damage between alcoholic women and men, it is necessary to control for age and to have separate control groups of nonalcoholic men and women. Although the majority of studies suggest that women are more vulnerable to alcohol-induced brain damage than men, the evidence remains inconclusive.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2003 · Alcohol health and research world
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    ABSTRACT: One of the distinguishing features of prenatal alcohol exposure is impaired cognitive and behavioral function resulting from damage to the central nervous system. Information available from the small number of autopsied cases in humans indicates that the offspring of mothers who abused alcohol during pregnancy have various neuroanatomical alterations ranging from gross reductions in brain size to cellular alterations. Recent neuroimaging technology provides the most powerful tool for assessing the neurotoxic effects of fetal alcohol exposure in living organisms and for exploring the relationship between behavioral dysfunction and brain damage at the regional level. Recently, animal research has suggested that the damaging effects of alcohol exposure during brain development could be prevented or attenuated by various pharmacological manipulations or by complex motor training. These promising findings provide directions for developing future prevention or intervention strategies.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2003 · Alcohol health and research world
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    ABSTRACT: One central component in the complex network of processes leading to the development of alcoholic liver disease is the activation of immune cells residing in the liver (i.e., Kupffer cells) by a substance called endotoxin, which is released by bacteria living in the intestine. Alcohol consumption can lead to increased endotoxin levels in the blood and liver. When activated, Kupffer cells produce signaling molecules (i.e., cytokines) that promote inflammatory reactions as well as molecules called reactive oxygen species (ROS), which can damage liver cells. Endotoxin activates Kupffer cells by interacting with a complex of protein molecules that are located on the outside of the Kupffer cell or which extend into the cell. Binding of endotoxin alters the activities of the proteins in this complex so that they trigger a cascade of biochemical signals in the Kupffer cell, resulting in cytokine and ROS production and, ultimately, liver damage. Because alcohol can enhance endotoxin release and, therefore, Kupffer cell activation, novel approaches to inhibit these processes might help prevent or ameliorate alcoholic liver disease.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2003 · Alcohol health and research world
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    ABSTRACT: Alcohol and other drug (AOD) use is common among adolescents, and its consequences pose important public health problems. Consequently, it is essential to understand the numerous factors that place adolescents at risk for AOD use. These factors include psychological and psychiatric influences (e.g., comorbid psychiatric disorders) as well as peer, environmental, and family factors. The impact of these factors may be moderated by other influences, such as the adolescents' previous AOD use experience and gender. A thorough understanding of the factors that influence adolescent AOD use, and how their effects may change as adolescents age, is
    Preview · Article · Jan 2002 · Alcohol health and research world
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    ABSTRACT: Clinicians working with alcohol-abusing or alcohol-dependent patients sometimes face a difficult task assessing their patient's psychiatric complaints because heavy drinking associated with alcoholism can coexist with, contribute to, or result from several different psychiatric syndromes. In order to improve diagnostic accuracy, clinicians can follow an algorithm that distinguishes among alcohol-related psychiatric symptoms and signs, alcohol-induced psychiatric syndromes, and independent psychiatric disorders that are commonly associated with alcoholism. The patient's gender, family history, and course of illness over time also should be considered to attain an accurate diagnosis. Moreover, clinicians need to remain flexible with their working diagnoses and revise them as needed while monitoring abstinence from alcohol.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2002 · Alcohol health and research world
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    ABSTRACT: Problematic gambling is more common among people with alcohol use disorders (AUDs) (i.e., either alcohol abuse or dependence) compared with those without AUDs. This association holds true for people in the general population and is even more pronounced among people receiving treatment. No broadly accepted explanation for the link between problematic gambling and AUD currently exists. The available literature suggests that common factors may increase the risk for both conditions. For example, a defect of functioning in a particular brain system may underlie both conditions. This hypothesis should be further developed using brain imaging and psychopharmacological studies. Effective treatment and prevention will require additional research into relevant associations on both the event level (e.g., the effects of drinking on gambling behavior and vice versa) and the syndrome level (e.g., the relative onset and course of each condition among those who have either one or both disorders). A prudent interpretation of the available data suggests careful screening and treatment when necessary for problematic gambling among people with alcohol abuse and for alcohol abuse among people with gambling problems.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2002 · Alcohol health and research world
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    ABSTRACT: Alcohol use by underage drinkers is a persistent public health problem in the United States, and alcohol is the most commonly used drug among adolescents. Accordingly, numerous approaches have been developed and studied that aim to prevent underage drinking. Some approaches are school based, involving curricula targeted at preventing alcohol, tobacco, or marijuana use. Other approaches are extracurricular, offering activities outside of school in the form of social or life skills training or alternative activities. Other strategies strive to involve the adolescents' families in the prevention programs. Policy strategies also have been implemented that have increased the minimum legal drinking age, reduced the commercial and social access of adolescents to alcohol, and reduced the economic availability of alcohol. Approaches involving the entire community also have been employed. Several programs (e.g., the Midwestern Prevention Project and Project Northland) have combined many of these strategies.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2002 · Alcohol health and research world
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    ABSTRACT: Alcohol use disorder (AUD) is the most common co-occurring disorder in people with schizophrenia. Both biological factors and psychosocial factors are thought to contribute to this co-occurrence. Schizophrenia patients with AUD are more likely to have social, legal, and medical problems, compared with other people with schizophrenia. AUD also complicates the course and treatment of schizophrenia.
    Preview · Article · Jan 2002 · Alcohol health and research world
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    ABSTRACT: Smoking and alcohol dependence frequently occur together, and both behaviors are determined in part by genetic influences. The Collaborative Study on the Genetics of Alcoholism (COGA), which is investigating the genetic factors contributing to alcohol dependence, also allows for analyses of the genetic factors determining smoking. Using a sample comprised of alcoholics and their closest (i.e., first-degree) relatives as well as a community-based control sample, COGA investigators found that both alcohol dependence and habitual smoking were transmitted within families. This familial transmission resulted from both common and drug-specific influences, which likely include genetic factors. Further genetic studies (i.e., candidate gene studies and genomic screening approaches) have identified several DNA regions that may contain genes that confer a susceptibility for alcoholism. Some of those genes also may contribute to the risk for habitual smoking. KEY
    Preview · Article · Jan 2000 · Alcohol health and research world

  • No preview · Article · Jan 2000 · Alcohol health and research world