Prospects (Prospects)

Publisher: Unesco; International Bureau of Education, Springer Verlag

Journal description

PROSPECTS, UNESCO's journal on education, has existed since 1971. The International Bureau of Education (IBE) in Geneva was responsible for its publication from 1994 until 2001. As of 2002, Kluwer Academic Publishers will co-publish the English language version of PROSPECTS. This journal enables UNESCO to communicate directly and indirectly with an international audience of scholars, decision-makers, graduate students and educators. PROSPECTS has served as a platform for the exchange of ideas on current and controversial educational themes for over thirty years; provides scholars in many different countries with the only source of information on international educational problems available in their national language; adopts a strong international approach by giving the floor to authors from around the world; presents the views of researchers, academics, decision-makers, curriculum developers, educators and graduate students; provides graduate students with a first and unique opportunity to participate in an international dialogue; regularly invites experts from the different sectors of UNESCO as guest editors to supervise issues, reflecting the organization's current priorities; editions in Arabic, Chinese, French, Russian and Spanish are available as well as a Bulgarian edition published by the national authorities. Information on these publications can be obtained from www.ibe.unesco.org PROSPECTS is a co-publication of the UNESCO International Bureau of Education, Geneva, Switzerland and Kluwer Academic Publishers.

Current impact factor: 0.00

Impact Factor Rankings

Additional details

5-year impact 0.00
Cited half-life 0.00
Immediacy index 0.00
Eigenfactor 0.00
Article influence 0.00
Website Prospects website
Other titles Prospects (Online)
ISSN 0033-1538
OCLC 50732308
Material type Government publication, International government publication, Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Springer Verlag

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Author's pre-print on pre-print servers such as arXiv.org
    • Author's post-print on author's personal website immediately
    • Author's post-print on any open access repository after 12 months after publication
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Set phrase to accompany link to published version (see policy)
    • Articles in some journals can be made Open Access on payment of additional charge
  • Classification
    green

Publications in this journal

  • Source

    Preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Prospects
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    ABSTRACT: This study aims to disentangle the complex relationships among student attributes, school context, and student performance in mathematics and science in Trinidad and Tobago, using the PISA 2009 data. Our findings reveal that schools account for a substantial amount of variation in students’ mathematics and science performances. School socioeconomic status (SES) had a significant effect on student achievement. Additionally, school SES had the single largest effect on mathematics and science achievement among the sample of students of all the explanatory variables. Students who never repeated primary school and who came from two-parent homes outperformed their counterparts on both subjects. Interestingly, females outscored males in science, but there was no significant gender difference in mathematics. These findings suggest the important role of school context in understanding student performance in Trinidad and Tobago and the Caribbean.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Prospects
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    ABSTRACT: This exploratory comparative case study examines three schools in the Autonomous City of Buenos Aires that have a considerable number of recent immigrant students. The article illustrates how these schools advance ideas of inclusiveness and pluralism through the curriculum and educational opportunities, as mandated by the national education law of 2006 and current core curricular standards. The study draws on data from participant observations and semi-structured interviews with administrators and teachers, gathered between 2009 and 2010. Preliminary results show inconsistent practices across schools, leaving many immigrant students ill-prepared and unsupported to become acculturated into Argentine society. This inconsistency appears to stem, at least in part, from two factors: the schools’ missions and organizational practices; and lack of teacher in-service training and sufficient support from the city’s central administration.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Prospects
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    ABSTRACT: This article examines the pedagogical dimension of vospitanie, or character formation, in communist and post-communist education. It explores how vospitanie is conceptualized in two teacher-education textbooks—one from each period—in Ukraine, a post-Soviet country. Comparative analysis shows how conceptualizations of vospitanie have evolved over time and across political regimes. Instruction on vospitanie for future teachers has a comprehensive structure based on the two “pillars” of labour and the collective, with an increasing focus on democracy and humanism in the post-communist era. Even though regime change and ideological shifts led to some modifications in the conceptualization of vospitanie, this article recommends a more decentralized approach and practical instructions for teachers to ensure the concept’s relevance in post-Soviet society. It also suggests that educators today could explore—and implement—some of the ideas developed in the Soviet period to improve character education within Ukraine and in other national contexts.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Prospects
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    ABSTRACT: In addition to basic infrastructure, what school resources are important to improve learning? This question is hard to answer due to lack of availability of appropriate data. Collaboration between researchers at US universities and a large, well-established educational foundation in India enabled this study to overcome the challenge of data availability. The study used a unique 60-item instrument—with data from 88 government schools—that generated 8 different indices of school resources. The article finds that in schools with more learning-specific facilities and more co-curricular activities children perform well in math, all else being equal. This article discusses the study’s limitations and implications for research, policy and practice.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · Prospects
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    ABSTRACT: In recent decades, both India and Vietnam have successfully expanded access to schooling to near-universal levels and have shifted their focus to quality-oriented policy reform. Yet, international and national evidence shows strongly contrasting learning profiles for children within the two systems. Simple indicators of numeracy suggest similar learning levels in both countries for 5-year-olds, but data suggest that, by the time they are 15, Vietnamese pupils outperform those in many OECD countries, while many pupils in India fail to master even the most basic skills. This article examines evidence from the Young Lives longitudinal surveys for Vietnam and the Indian state of Andhra Pradesh on the diverging learning profiles of children in the light of their socioeconomic, cultural, and educational contexts. It considers various explanations for this divergence, including recent education policies, and highlights potential areas for cross-country policy learning.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · Prospects
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    ABSTRACT: Ensuring that every child gets a teacher is a prerequisite to reaching the Education for All goals. Today, 58 million children are still not in school, and while a variety of factors constrain efforts to provide quality primary education for all children, ensuring that classrooms have enough teachers is at the top of the list. Since 2006, the UNESCO Institute for Statistics has been projecting the global demand for teachers. This article presents the latest figures and the methodology behind these projections; it also estimates the costs associated with recruiting enough teachers in sub-Saharan Africa to achieve universal primary education by 2020.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · Prospects
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    ABSTRACT: This article provides an overview of how teacher quality and learning outcomes are included in national education policies. It responds to a set of specific questions focused on strategies to improve learning, links between teacher quality and learning outcomes, and how policy seeks to overcome learning obstacles for the most disadvantaged. The article uses data collated from the national education plans of forty developing countries. It includes a summary of key lessons and observations related to the inclusion of teaching and learning in education policy and a range of strategies that can support teaching and learning, both directly and indirectly.
    No preview · Article · Aug 2015 · Prospects
  • Source

    Preview · Article · Aug 2015 · Prospects
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    ABSTRACT: This Introduction highlights the main focus of the special issue on "Overcoming inequalities in teaching and learning". The 2013/4 Education for All Global Monitoring Report (GMR), Teaching and Learning: Achieving Quality Education for All, underlines the fact that a lack of attention to education quality and a failure to reach the marginalized have contributed to a learning crisis that needs urgent attention. Based on selected background papers for the 2013/4 GMR, this special issue draws attention to twin problems that restrain learning and result in wide inequalities: home background and teaching quality. To overcome the learning crisis, these factors must be tackled simultaneously. For education to be an equalizer, countries must develop contextually-relevant strategies, with particular attention to supporting teachers in their efforts to overcome inequalities in learning.
    No preview · Article · Aug 2015 · Prospects
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    ABSTRACT: This article analyzes the factors that explain the gap in educational outcomes between the top and bottom quartile of students in different countries, according to their socioeconomic status. To do so, it uses PISA microdata for 10 middle-income and 2 high-income countries, and applies the Oaxaca-Blinder decomposition method. Its results show that students’ individual variables only explain differences in high-income countries; meanwhile, school and teacher quality, and better practices, matter even in different institutional settings. From a policy perspective, this evidence supports actions to improve school and teacher quality in order to reduce cross-country differences and differences between students at the top and bottom of socioeconomic distribution.
    No preview · Article · Aug 2015 · Prospects
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    ABSTRACT: Latin American teachers’ unions have stepped into the policymaking sphere and shaped education policies unrelated to regular workplace priorities like salaries and class sizes at notable moments. The literature on teachers’ unions in Latin America has not addressed this, tending to focus instead on those unions’ history and role in social movements, or their struggles against controversial education reform. This article links existing literatures in an effort to explain why teachers’ unions sometimes break from their normal workplace demands to take an active role in education policymaking. Drawing on case studies of Brazil, Bolivia, Chile, Venezuela, and Guatemala, it argues that teachers’ unions break out of this usual role and promulgate system-enhancing education policy in the context of societywide social movements, such as those that lead to democratization or indigenous rights. However, only where these policies meet a receptive government are they translated from proposal to practice.
    No preview · Article · Aug 2015 · Prospects