The Personnel journal (Workforce)

Current impact factor: 0.00

Impact Factor Rankings

Additional details

5-year impact 0.00
Cited half-life 0.00
Immediacy index 0.00
Eigenfactor 0.00
Article influence 0.00
Other titles Workforce tools., Workforce extra., Workforce products & services directory., Workforce (Costa Mesa, Calif.), Workforce, Work force
ISSN 0031-5745
OCLC 36210566
Material type Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Journal / Magazine / Newspaper, Internet Resource

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: 196 employees of the Harris Trust and Savings Bank of Chicago were given the Bernreuter Personality Inventory, scored for "neurotic tendency," the Otis Higher Examination, Form B, and a special work-attitude questionnaire designed to quantify the subject's attitude toward his specific job. The groups consisted of 93 women, 40 page girls, and 63 men. The Bernreuter scores correlate only slightly with ratings on efficiency; such correlations as do appear are in the direction of a relationship between neurotic tendency and lowered efficiency. They also bear a slight but consistent relationship to work attitudes. Those whose scores fall into the most neurotic quarter of the distribution have a slight tendency toward dissatisfaction with and maladjustment to their jobs. Correlations between Otis test scores and ratings on efficiency were found ranging from .34 to .57. When Otis and Bernreuter tests are used jointly in the discrimination between the efficient and the inefficient the Bernreuter test does not contribute enough to justify its use as a supplement, and the author suggests that there has been too much emphasis on the significance of neurotic tendency in accounting for work maladjustment, inefficiency and unrest. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
    No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · The Personnel journal
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In the United States much of the work on problems of human efficiency is done by engineers who lack psychological training. A comparatively small number of psychologists are giving their full time to research in psychological problems of industry. Psychologists concentrate on employment tests. On the other hand there is a rather extensive use of common sense, non-technical psychology on the part of the industrial executives. In England the work of the industrial psychologists is distinctly in advance of that in this country. However, industrial relations are less influenced by psychological considerations. Most of the research is conducted by the National Institute of Industrial Psychology and the Industrial Health Research Board. Psychologists are included in the personnel of these. Such things are studied as hours of work, industrial accidents, atmospheric conditions, illumination, vocational guidance, selection, posture and physique. Concrete problems of this sort are taken up at the request of individual firms on a consulting basis. In Germany there is very little sympathetic feeling or understanding between the management and the worker. There is, however, very definite interest in practical results and much familiarity with American literature on industrial psychology; and the leaders, at least, of the trade unions favor the general efficiency movement. The psychologists are in a more strategic position there and receive more recognition. Technical institutes connected with some of the engineering schools conduct investigations in industry, and also give psychotechnical training to engineering graduates, so that they go out into industry with a fair background of this sort. A rather extensive use of vocational tests is in progress. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
    No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · The Personnel journal

  • No preview · Article · Nov 2001 · The Personnel journal

  • No preview · Article · Oct 2001 · The Personnel journal

  • No preview · Article · Sep 2001 · The Personnel journal

  • No preview · Article · Aug 2001 · The Personnel journal

  • No preview · Article · Jul 2001 · The Personnel journal

  • No preview · Article · Jun 2001 · The Personnel journal

  • No preview · Article · Apr 2001 · The Personnel journal

  • No preview · Article · Feb 2001 · The Personnel journal

  • No preview · Article · Jan 2001 · The Personnel journal

  • No preview · Article · Dec 2000 · The Personnel journal

  • No preview · Article · Dec 2000 · The Personnel journal

  • No preview · Article · Oct 2000 · The Personnel journal

  • No preview · Article · Mar 2000 · The Personnel journal

  • No preview · Article · Nov 1999 · The Personnel journal

  • No preview · Article · Nov 1999 · The Personnel journal

  • No preview · Article · Nov 1999 · The Personnel journal
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Many companies will be facing a critical shortage of top executives in the next few years. About five years ago, the human resources professionals at Motorola realized their company was facing a problem -a huge problem -one that if left untended could affect the competitiveness, profitability and future growth of the technology giant. The problem involved nothing less than the CEO and many members of the senior management team. The problem had nothing to do with how well those executives were doing their jobs, but rather who would do those jobs once they retired. You see, like many large, established companies, Motorola's most senior people -the strategists and visionaries who run divisions and manage critical functions -are in their late 50s and set to retire in the next few years. According to Susan Hooker, director of global organizational learning and development at the Schaumburg, Illinois-based company, if Motorola's HR department didn't turn up the heat on the company's leadership-development efforts, there would be no qualified successors ready to step in when the company's key executives retire. Fortunately, Motorola has done just that, and is now planning for the retirement of key executives with confidence. Other companies, unless they act now, may not be so lucky. A recent study by Development Dimensions International Inc. (DDI), an organizational development firm based in Bridgeville, Pennsylvania, reveals that one-fifth of this country's large, established companies will be losing 40 percent or more of their top-level talent in the next five years as senior executives reach retirement age. This, on its own, wouldn't be so bad. What makes this a potential crisis is that -thanks to a lack of planning and a lack of people -there's a severe shortage of qualified replacements.
    Preview · Article · Sep 1999 · The Personnel journal
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: How can an employer convince an employee who may have to spend $20-120 a month for benefits (previously paid by the employer) that the expenditure makes sense? United Hospitals confronted the issue head-on when it began its flex benefits program. The company made flex work by involving managers in planning and developing an extensive communication program.
    No preview · Article · Jan 1990 · The Personnel journal