Monthly review (New York, N.Y.: 1949) (MON REV)

Journal description

In May 1949 Monthly Review began publication in New York City, as cold war hysteria gathered force in the United States. The first issue featured the lead article Why Socialism? by Albert Einstein. From the first Monthly Review spoke for socialism and against U.S. imperialism, and is still doing so today. From the first Monthly Review was independent of any political organization, and is still so today. The McCarthy era inquisition targeted Monthly Review's original editors Paul Sweezy and Leo Huberman, who fought back successfully. In the subsequent global upsurge against capitalism, imperialism and the commodification of life (in shorthand '1968') Monthly Review played a global role. A generation of activists received no small part of their education as subscribers to the magazine and readers of Monthly Review Press books. In the intervening years of counter-revolution, Monthly Review has kept a steady viewpoint. That point of view is the heartfelt attempt to frame the issues of the day with one set of interests foremost in mind: those of the great majority of humankind, the propertyless.


Journal Impact: 0.37*

*This value is calculated using ResearchGate data and is based on average citation counts from work published in this journal. The data used in the calculation may not be exhaustive.

Journal impact history

2016 Journal impact Available summer 2017
2015 Journal impact 0.37
2014 Journal impact 0.31
2013 Journal impact 0.56
2012 Journal impact 0.75
2011 Journal impact 0.60
2010 Journal impact 0.92
2009 Journal impact 0.46
2008 Journal impact 0.35
2007 Journal impact 0.26
2006 Journal impact 0.26
2005 Journal impact 0.23
2004 Journal impact 0.19
2003 Journal impact 0.35
2002 Journal impact 0.15
2001 Journal impact 0.09
2000 Journal impact 0.20

Journal impact over time

Journal impact
Year

Additional details

Cited half-life >10.0
Immediacy index 0.28
Eigenfactor 0.00
Article influence 0.24
Website Monthly Review website
Other titles Monthly review (New York, N.Y.: 1949), Monthly review
ISSN 0027-0520
OCLC 1758661
Material type Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Journal / Magazine / Newspaper, Internet Resource

Publisher details

This journal may support self-archiving.
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Publications in this journal

  • Article · Sep 2016 · Monthly review (New York, N.Y.: 1949)
  • Article · Sep 2016 · Monthly review (New York, N.Y.: 1949)
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: For it is because we are kept in the dark about the nature of human society as opposed to nature in general that we are now faced (so the scientists concerned assure me), by the complete destructibility of this planet that has barely been made fit to live in.
    Article · Sep 2016 · Monthly review (New York, N.Y.: 1949)
  • Article · Sep 2016 · Monthly review (New York, N.Y.: 1949)
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Marx's Capital presents a rigorous scientific analysis of the capitalist mode of production and capitalist society, and how they differ from earlier forms. Volume 1 delves into the heart of the problem. It directly clarifies the meaning of the generalization of commodity exchanges between private property owners (and this characteristic is unique to the modern world of capitalism, even if commodity exchanges had existed earlier), specifically the emergence and dominance of value and abstract social labor.… Volume 2 demonstrates why and how capital accumulation functions, more specifically, why and how accumulation successfully integrates the exploitation of labor in its reproduction and overcomes the effects of the social contradiction that it represents.… Volume 3 of Capital is different. Here Marx moves from the analysis of capitalism in its fundamental aspects (its "ideal average") to that of the historical reality of capitalism.… To move from the reading of Capital (and particularly of volumes 1 and 2) to that of historical capitalisms at successive moments of their deployment has its own requirements, even beyond reading all of Marx and Engels.Click here to purchase a PDF version of this article at the Monthly Review website.
    Article · Jul 2016 · Monthly review (New York, N.Y.: 1949)
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: In 1964, Paul Baran and Paul Sweezy wrote an essay entitled "Notes on the Theory of Imperialism" for a festschrift in honor of the sixty-fifth birthday of the great Polish Marxist economist Michał Kalecki.… [T]he essay offered the first major analysis of multinational corporations within Marxian theory. Parts of it were incorporated into Baran and Sweezy's Monopoly Capital in 1966, two years after Baran's death. Yet for all that book's depth, "Notes on the Theory of Imperialism" provided a more complete view of their argument on the growth of multinationals. In October and November 1969, Harry Magdoff and Sweezy wrote their article "Notes on the Multinational Corporation," picking up where Baran and Sweezy had left off. That same year, Magdoff published his landmark The Age of Imperialism, which systematically extended the analysis of the U.S. economy into the international domain.… In the analyses of Baran, Sweezy, and Magdoff, as distinct from the dominant liberal perspective, the multinational corporation was the product of the very same process of concentration and centralization of capital that had created monopoly capital itself.Click here to purchase a PDF version of this article at the Monthly Review website.
    Article · Jul 2016 · Monthly review (New York, N.Y.: 1949)
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: During the past decade, persistent excess productive capacity, at levels exceeding at times 25 percent, has blighted the British economy, along with rates of unemployment not experienced for two decades, with the result that a substantial proportion of the economy's productive resources remain underutilized. Orthodox economic theory often ascribes such phenomena to a lack of capital for investment. However, in the same period, interest rates have been historically low, and the UK corporate sector has accumulated increasing reserves of surplus capital. Clearly, there has been no shortage of capital for investment. The failure to invest stems not from the supply of capital, but instead from the paucity of investment opportunities, suggesting that British capitalism is mired in stagnation.Click here to purchase a PDF version of this article at the Monthly Review website.
    Article · Jul 2016 · Monthly review (New York, N.Y.: 1949)
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: In 1964, I began my graduate studies at Cambridge University. The reading list included a book by Josef Steindl with the intriguing title Maturity and Stagnation in American Capitalism. I read it, and was immediately drawn to the last chapter, "Karl Marx and the Accumulation of Capital." Aside from reading the first few chapters of Capital in a study group, I had not yet read any of Marx's economic writings (predictably, none had been assigned in any of my college courses). However, that last chapter persuaded me that Steindl's analysis aligned with what I understood to be Marx's general vision about the "laws of motion" of capitalist economies.… This set the stage for my reading of Baran and Sweezy's Monopoly Capital in the spring of 1966. I devoured that book. I doubt that I got up from the kitchen table until I had read it from cover to cover.Click here to purchase a PDF version of this article at the Monthly Review website.
    Article · Jul 2016 · Monthly review (New York, N.Y.: 1949)
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: After fifty years, Paul Baran and Paul Sweezy's Monopoly Capital has stood the test of time. Not only did it provide a lucid description of midcentury American society, but Monopoly Capital established a framework for analyzing events to come.… By bringing Marxian theory into their historical moment, they fomented many debates and encouraged the development of various perspectives, a legacy that has expanded to include analyses of the labor process, imperialism, finance, globalization, and the environment.… They elucidated a fundamental contradiction of the time. Capitalism is a system of self-expanding value that must continually accumulate, yet is confined by a social and institutional order that precludes rapid accumulation. This framework is especially useful for analyzing the fundamental problems of the twenty-first century. Among those crucial problems is the demise of the hydrocarbon economy.Click here to purchase a PDF version of this article at the Monthly Review website.
    Article · Jul 2016 · Monthly review (New York, N.Y.: 1949)
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: The central problem in advanced monopoly capitalism is not one of scarce resources clashing against innate, insatiable wants. Rather, it is one of an abundance of production clashing against saturated consumption and investment markets. In order to absorb potential economic output and forestall excess capacity, business interests must continuously search for new markets to exploit or entice existing customers who stand ready to buy the latest product, iteration, or service, and to induce new investment. The key to business survival in a capitalist economy is continual expansion of market share and reach: grow or die.… The efforts applied to this relentless drive undermine the conventional wisdom of market-determined pricing—for were a competitive price system in place, the funds for these expenditures would not exist. As I will show, the resources and funds expended in this quixotic endeavor to grow can be broadly referred to as the "economic surplus."Click here to purchase a PDF version of this article at the Monthly Review website.
    Article · Jul 2016 · Monthly review (New York, N.Y.: 1949)
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: The financialization of capitalism has been marked by the sustained rise of financial profits. In the United States, financial profits as a proportion of total profits rose enormously from the early 1980s to the early 2000s, collapsed during 2007–09, and subsequently recovered, but without reaching previous heights. During this period, the trend of the average rate of profit has been largely flat. The relative rise of financial profits in spite of stagnant average profitability represents a theoretical and empirical conundrum. We will argue that the answer should be sought partly in financial expropriation, but also in public interest rates kept at extraordinarily low levels. In this light, the rise of financial profits represents a vast public subsidy to the financial system characteristic of financialization.Click here to purchase a PDF version of this article at the Monthly Review website.
    Article · Jul 2016 · Monthly review (New York, N.Y.: 1949)
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Paul Baran and Paul Sweezy's Monopoly Capital is a classic that has long outlived the conjuncture in American capitalism that it described. In a deep and scholarly way, its authors exposed the deep structure of that capitalism, which determined the dynamics of the system and therefore those "surface" phenomena of unemployment and poverty—symptoms not of any functional malaise in capitalism (the "market failures" beloved by academic economists), but of the very way in which modern capitalism works. The authors of the book may therefore be forgiven for providing only the lightest sketch of the ideas and theories they used in their analysis. In this essay, I try to uncover some of those ideas and theories to show how they represent a shift from the analysis in Sweezy's earlier work the Theory of Capitalist Development, and how the two books are linked to the ideas of Karl Marx in a way that can only be understood through the work of Michał Kalecki and Josef Steindl. Baran and Sweezy knew and admired Kalecki and Steindl and, as I will try to show, continued what might be called Marx's "project" very much in their spirit.Click here to purchase a PDF version of this article at the Monthly Review website.
    Article · Jul 2016 · Monthly review (New York, N.Y.: 1949)
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Monopoly Capital had an outstanding impact on students of my generation. It was published just as the Vietnam War was heating up, when students and youth throughout the world were beginning to "contest the structures"—to use a favorite expression of that time—and were eagerly looking for analyses of these "structures." Monopoly Capital, written jointly by two renowned Marxist economists, each of whom had already authored a classic, provided just that. It was avidly read in progressive circles around the world.… For students of economics like myself, there was an additional reason for its impact. Economic literature from both the Communist world and from Communist writers in the West tended to underplay the problem of aggregate demand. While Marx had been a trenchant critic of Say's Law and had highlighted the demand problem, it was by this time seen at most as a problem underlying periodic crises, but not one that could affect capitalism in a secular sense, ex ante.Click here to purchase a PDF version of this article at the Monthly Review website.
    Article · Jul 2016 · Monthly review (New York, N.Y.: 1949)
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: A half-century after its publication, Paul Baran and Paul Sweezy's Monopoly Capital remains the single most influential work in Marxian political economy to emerge in the United States.… In recent years, interest in Baran and Sweezy's magnum opus has revived, primarily for two reasons: (1) the global resurgence of debates over the constellation of issues that their work addressed—including economic stagnation, monopoly, inequality, militarism and imperialism, multinational corporations, economic waste, surplus capital absorption, financial speculation, and plutocracy; and (2) the new, fundamental insights into the book's origins resulting from the publication of its two missing chapters and the public release of Baran and Sweezy's correspondence.… I shall divide this introduction on the influence and development of the argument of Monopoly Capital over the last fifty years into three parts: (1) a brief treatment of the book itself and its historical context; (2) a discussion of responses to Monopoly Capital, and of the development of the tradition that it represented, during its first four decades, up to the Great Financial Crisis that began in 2007; and (3) an assessment of the continuing significance of monopoly capital theory in the context of the historical period stretching from the Great Financial Crisis to the present.Click here to purchase a PDF version of this article at the Monthly Review website.
    Article · Jul 2016 · Monthly review (New York, N.Y.: 1949)
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Paul Street, They Rule: The 1% vs. Democracy (London: Routledge, 2014), 252 pages, $30.95, paperback.In They Rule, Paul Street offers a thorough deconstruction of the status quo of U.S. capitalism. The book's subtitle gives a nod to the Occupy Wall Street movement, whose main victory was to popularize the concept of U.S. class conflict, as embodied in the "1 percent." The title also recalls John Carpenter's 1987 film They Live, a sci-fi spoof of the Reagan era that prefigured the Occupy revolt. Carpenter's characters don "magic sunglasses" for intellectual defense against media misinformation.… One current form of that misinformation is the view that the Democratic Party exercises "left" politics. Street smashes this notion.… [However,] this is no academic query.Click here to purchase a PDF version of this article at the Monthly Review website.
    Article · Jun 2016 · Monthly review (New York, N.Y.: 1949)
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: It has been nearly fifty years since the height of the Vietnam War—or, as it is known in Vietnam, the American War—and yet its memory continues to loom large over U.S. politics, culture, and foreign policy. The battle to define the war's lessons and legacies has been a proxy for larger clashes over domestic politics, national identity, and U.S. global power. One of its most debated areas has been the mass antiwar movement that achieved its greatest heights in the United States but also operated globally. Within this, and for the antiwar left especially, a major point of interest has been the history of soldier protest during the war.… Activists looked back to this history for good reason.… Soldiers, such potent symbols of U.S. patriotism, turned their guns around—metaphorically, but also, at times, literally—during a time of war.Click here to purchase a PDF version of this article at the Monthly Review website.
    Article · Jun 2016 · Monthly review (New York, N.Y.: 1949)
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: As the corporate takeover of public schools proceeds apace on a global scale, so too does the grassroots resistance. In the United States…. [o]ver 600,000 parents opted their children out of the tests in spring 2015; students have launched walkouts and boycotts; school boards are passing resolutions against overtesting; and teachers at a Seattle high school collectively refused to administer a test they deemed harmful to instruction. These actions and more demonstrate the hope and promise of public schools as sites for resilience and democratic resistance, even as corporate interests tighten their grip on schools under cover of "education reform." This article reflects strategically on the fight for public education, with a special focus on the Opt Out movement, which was recently the subject of a special issue of Monthly Review. My treatment applauds opting out as a tactic in an organizing toolkit, but rejects it as a strategy, and takes issue with the analysis of corporate school reform proffered by the leading advocates of Opt Out.Click here to purchase a PDF version of this article at the Monthly Review website.
    Article · Jun 2016 · Monthly review (New York, N.Y.: 1949)
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Connections, both real and hoped for, between the labor movement and environmentalists have been news for at least fifteen years now. The possibility of such a connection came into wider view at the Seattle World Trade Organization protests in 1999, when alliances between trade unionists and other protest groups made headlines…. Despite the once-exciting and novel possibility being now institutionalized in such organizations as the Labor Network for Sustainability, the Blue-Green Alliance, and SustainLabour, the thrill seems to be gone for mainstream environmentalist discourse, and labor has largely faded from view.… [The struggle to reduce work hours is fertile ground for uniting the efforts of workers and environmentalists.]… That fight for time, however, came to an end decades ago. Now those with jobs demand higher wages instead, and perhaps even overtime work, while the many unemployed and underemployed fight to work at all. Today the dominant idea of a working-class agenda is to fight to be allowed to sell one's time.Click here to purchase a PDF version of this article at the Monthly Review website.
    Article · Jun 2016 · Monthly review (New York, N.Y.: 1949)
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: One of the lasting contributions of the Frankfurt School of social theorists, represented especially by Max Horkheimer and Theodor Adorno's 1944 Dialectic of Enlightenment, was the development of a philosophical critique of the domination of nature.… Yet their critique of the Enlightenment exploitation of nature was eventually extended to a critique of Marx himself as an Enlightenment figure, especially in relation to his mature work in Capital.… So all-encompassing was the critique of the "dialectic of the Enlightenment" within the main line of the Frankfurt School, and within what came to be known as "Western Marxism"…, that it led to the estrangement of thinkers in this tradition not only from the later Marx, but also from natural science—and hence nature itself. Consequently, when the ecological movement emerged in the 1960s and '70s, Western Marxism, with its abstract, philosophical notion of the domination of nature, was ill-equipped to analyze the changing and increasingly perilous forms of material interaction between humanity and nature.Click here to purchase a PDF version of this article at the Monthly Review website.
    Article · Jun 2016 · Monthly review (New York, N.Y.: 1949)
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Todd Jailer, Miriam Lara-Meloy, and Maggie Robbins, The Workers' Guide to Health and Safety (Berkely, CA: Hesperian, 2015), 576 pages, $34.95, paperback.The new Workers' Guide to Health and Safety—with drawings on every page—is a fun read, which is an unusual thing to say about a book with such a serious intent. Garrett Brown, an industrial hygienist with decades of experience as an inspector and activist in California, Mexico, and Bangladesh, claimed with some justification that of all the books on occupational health and safety, "almost none…are accessible to workers or their organizations." The Workers' Guide is the first major book aimed at organizing for healthier conditions in the labor-intensive export industries of countries like Bangladesh and China, Mexico's maquiladora frontier, in Central America and Southeast Asia, and even in the United States itself, where for many, working and living conditions are being beaten down.Click here to purchase a PDF version of this article at the Monthly Review website.
    Article · May 2016 · Monthly review (New York, N.Y.: 1949)