Journal of Leisure Research (J LEISURE RES)

Journal description

Innovative, timely, and respected, the Journal of Leisure Research has published original research to advance the field of leisure studies since 1968. JLR is scientific in content and nature, focusing on conceptual and methodological advances and questions. In cooperation with the University of Minnesota, JLR is published five times annually. JLR is an official publication of the National Recreation and Park Association.

Current impact factor: 0.51

Impact Factor Rankings

2016 Impact Factor Available summer 2017
2009 Impact Factor 0.831

Additional details

5-year impact 1.21
Cited half-life >10.0
Immediacy index 0.08
Eigenfactor 0.00
Article influence 0.32
Website Journal of Leisure Research website
ISSN 0022-2216

Publications in this journal


  • No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Journal of Leisure Research
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    ABSTRACT: This paper explores the dominant discourses associated with childhood obesity, children's leisure, and parenting practice, as revealed through two mainstream parenting magazines. Specifically, critical discourse analysis (CDA) is used to explore the discursive messages associated with childhood obesity; paying particular attention to the implications of this discourse for children's leisure and for parental responsibility. Implicit and explicit messages from a variety (n=70) of different texts (articles, images, advertisements etc.) were analyzed. Three central themes emerged: (a) instilling a fear of fat, (b) the notion of parental choice, and (c) the obligatory nature of leisure. These themes are discussed in light of critical theory and its application to the moral regulation of parenting as well as children's health and leisure.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2015 · Journal of Leisure Research
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    ABSTRACT: Arthritis is one of the most prevalent chronic health conditions in mid to late life, and leisure may provide potential health benefits. The study aims were to establish the predictive utility of leisure activities and leisure-based selective optimization with compensation (L-SOC) in explaining arthritis-based health and to determine whether physically active leisure serves as a mediator of L-SOC and health. The study sample included 140 middle-aged and older adults with arthritis. A mediator model was not supported. Instead, L-SOC and leisure activity expenditures were significant independent predictors of arthritis-based health. Findings provide preliminary support for a measure of leisure-specifc SOC and indicate that accumulating physical activity expenditures across diverse leisure activities is an important component of arthritis self-management.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2015 · Journal of Leisure Research
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    ABSTRACT: This study utilized a nation-wide survey (n=73,622) to examine the associations of leisure time, leisure activities, and demographics with happiness among residents in China. Ordered logit regression analyses indicated that leisure time was positively associated with happiness. While passive leisure activities (e.g., watching TV, Internet surfing) were found to contribute to happiness, active leisure activities (e.g., exercising, socializing, and shopping) had no significant association with happiness. Among demographic variables, income was found to have a positive association with happiness; females were found to be generally happier than males, and urban residents happier than their rural counterparts. While age was surprisingly found to have no relation to happiness, education levels seemed to have varied non-linear relationships with happiness. The study contributes to empirically verifying the relationship between leisure and happiness and generates implications directing leisure policies and industry practices in China.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2015 · Journal of Leisure Research
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    ABSTRACT: This study examined the measurement properties and cross-cultural equivalence of a constraints negotiation model in the context of outdoor recreation. A convenience sample of 263 U.S. and 537 Chinese university students provided data by completing questionnaires in English and Chinese, respectively. Multiple models were fitted using confrmatory factor analysis. A hypothesized six-factor first-order model did not fit the U.S. data, but a modified four-factor model achieved acceptable fit. A second-order negotiation measurement model fit the U.S. data, but failed the nested?2 tests. Results did not support conceptual invariance between the English and Chinese version of the scale, suggesting further inquiry is important before moving forward with its use cross-culturally. Findings and implications are discussed with future studies suggested.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2015 · Journal of Leisure Research
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    ABSTRACT: Considerable scholarship has demonstrated that the tenure and quality of our experiences and the physical characteristics of the setting help to predict sense of place (SOP). Less research has examined how communication contributes to place meanings and attachment. Working from the general premise that communication produces meaning, this study examined how exposure to communication about a national park contributes to visitor meanings and attachment to these places. Using survey data from three national parks, this study demonstrated that visitors envisioned parks as blending "natural" and "human" elements. Results suggest that park-related communication contributes to SOP, independent of variables commonly used to predict this concept. Theoretical implications and avenues for future research are discussed.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2015 · Journal of Leisure Research
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    ABSTRACT: While consensus exists around the importance of providing structured experiences, the industries interested in offering such experiences lack a common body of shared knowledge about how most effectively to do so. Potentially complementary research on structured experiences remains fragmented across multiple fields such as leisure, tourism, and marketing. The purpose of this paper, therefore, was first to review and then integrate this scattered literature into a structured experience framework in order to facilitate experience-related research with broader applicability for both commercial and public organizations interested in providing structured experiences.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2015 · Journal of Leisure Research
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    ABSTRACT: Renewable energy initiatives are increasing and many locations selected for offshore wind farms are close to recreation resources. Public involvement processes to assess project support are standard in offshore wind energy planning. However, often missing from these assessments are investigations into subpopulations, such as marine recreationists. Using mixed methods, researchers evaluated a scale that measures marine recreationists' (n = 483) attitudes toward offshore wind energy. Researchers also examined the relationships between place attachment and opposition and support for the proposed projects. Results suggest that place attachment can assist in predicting attitudes toward offshore wind energy development, but the explanatory power and the nature of the relationships differed between two communities. Implications for communication, outreach, and recreation management are discussed.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2015 · Journal of Leisure Research
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    ABSTRACT: This study examined whether leisure self-determination and leisure social support were related to acute stress and chronic stress among older adults. Participants were 141 older nursing home residents with high stress levels and 322 older community dwellers with low stress levels. Data were collected using face-to-face surveys, which included measures of leisure self-determination, leisure social support, and acute stress. Chronic stress was measured using an electrocardiogram. Data were analyzed using regression analysis. The results indicated that leisure self-determination and leisure social support were negatively correlated with acute stress among nursing home and community participants. However, leisure self-determination and leisure social support were not correlated with chronic stress in these two groups of older adults. Implications of the results are discussed.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2015 · Journal of Leisure Research
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    ABSTRACT: This qualitative study intensively examined the role of leisure in meaning-making with 33 community-dwelling adults (18 females, 15 males; aged 24 to 78) from diverse cultural backgrounds (10 African Americans, 10 Caucasians, 9 Latinos, and 4 Asian Americans) with mental illness. Analyses of the interview data identified several key themes of meaning-making through leisure including the role of leisure in promoting (a) a joyful life, (b) a composed life, (c) a connected life (e.g., socially, spiritually), (d) a discovered life, and (e) a hopeful and empowered life. Supported and contextualized by these specific themes, an overarching leisure meaning-making theme, which emerged from this study, is inspiration for an engaged life. The findings based on the participants' voices/insights suggest that leisure gives strength, peace of mind, inspiration, and more depth and color to one's life and makes it more well rounded in the journey to recovery.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2015 · Journal of Leisure Research