The Indian Journal of Pediatrics (Indian J Pediatr)

Publisher: All-India Institute of Medical Sciences. Dept. of Pediatrics, Springer Verlag

Journal description

A Premier Pediatric Journal in India, established in 1933 by the doyen of Pediatrics arena, the Late Dr. K.C Chaudhuri. A monthly publication published from the Department of Pediatrics, All India Institute Of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India. The Oldest Specialty Journal in India keeping track with the most current trends in the world of Pediatrics.

Current impact factor: 0.87

Impact Factor Rankings

2016 Impact Factor Available summer 2017
2014 / 2015 Impact Factor 0.867
2013 Impact Factor 0.919
2012 Impact Factor 0.715
2011 Impact Factor 0.521
2010 Impact Factor 0.502
2009 Impact Factor 0.539
2008 Impact Factor 0.646

Impact factor over time

Impact factor
Year

Additional details

5-year impact 0.81
Cited half-life 6.90
Immediacy index 0.28
Eigenfactor 0.00
Article influence 0.21
Website Indian Journal of Pediatrics website
ISSN 0019-5456
OCLC 52511246
Material type Document, Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Springer Verlag

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Author's pre-print on pre-print servers such as arXiv.org
    • Author's post-print on author's personal website immediately
    • Author's post-print on any open access repository after 12 months after publication
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Set phrase to accompany link to published version (see policy)
    • Articles in some journals can be made Open Access on payment of additional charge
  • Classification
    green

Publications in this journal

  • Nivedita Mondal · Shreya Sharma · Bharathi Balachander · Dheeraj Vaishnav · Nishad Plakkal · B. Vishnu Bhat

    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · The Indian Journal of Pediatrics

  • No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · The Indian Journal of Pediatrics

  • No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · The Indian Journal of Pediatrics
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Objectives: To study the role of ultrasound in children with dengue fever and determine its role in predicting the severity of the disease. Methods: This was a retrospective hospital based study conducted from 1(st) August 2012 to January 31(st) 2015 at a tertiary care hospital in Puducherry. Results: Two hundred and fifty four children were admitted with dengue fever and among them non-severe dengue and severe dengue were seen in 62.6 % and 37.4 % respectively. Mean age of presentation was 7.0 (3.3) years. M: F ratio was 1.2:1 Ultrasound was performed on all children with dengue fever during the critical period of illness as an early sign of plasma leakage and at the time of discharge. The diagnosis was confirmed by NS1 antigen and dengue serology. Ultrasonography showed positive findings in 156 cases (61.4 %) during the critical period of illness. Ultrasound findings were analyzed using logistic regression among severe and non-severe dengue and P value of <0.05 was taken as significant. The common ultrasound findings that were significantly associated with severe dengue infection on univariate analysis were gall bladder wall thickening, ascites, pleural effusion, pericardial effusion, pericholecystic fluid, hepatomegaly, splenomegaly and mesenteric adenopathy. On multivariate analysis, gall bladder thickening and hepatomegaly were significantly associated with severe dengue infection. Gall bladder wall thickening (GBWT) with honeycombing pattern was the most specific finding in severe dengue infection in the study and significantly associated with severe thrombocytopenia (Platelet count <50,000/mm(3)). The clinical improvement coincided with resolving of the ultrasound findings at the time of discharge. Conclusions: Ultrasound can be used as an early predictor as well as an important prognostic sign for severe dengue infection especially during an epidemic.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · The Indian Journal of Pediatrics

  • No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · The Indian Journal of Pediatrics
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The authors aimed to study the impact of adherence to imatinib during initial 6 mo on the cytogenetic response in pediatric chronic myeloid leukemia - chronic phase (CML CP). The hospital records of pediatric CML patients (age ≤18 y) from 2009 through 2012, were analyzed retrospectively for the drug adherence and cytogenetic response (CyR) at 6 mo. Forty eight children were analyzed, with the median age of 13 y (range 5–18) and slight male preponderance (M:F- 1.18:1). Sokal scores were low, intermediate and high in 14 (29.3 %), 26 (54.1 %), 8 (16.6 %) children respectively. Only a little more than half of the children were adherent (58 %). At the end of 6 mo, complete cytogenetic response (CCyR) was achieved by 78.5 % of adherent children as compared to 5 % of non-adherent children. Majority (80 %) of the non-adherent children had only a partial cytogenetic response (PCyR). Therefore, it is concluded that most of the adherent children had optimal cytogenetic response at the end of 6 mo and majority of those in the non-adherent group did not attain it.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · The Indian Journal of Pediatrics

  • No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · The Indian Journal of Pediatrics
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Ultrasound (US) is a simple, non-invasive imaging modality which allows high-resolution imaging of the musculoskeletal (MSK) system. Its increasing popularity in pediatrics is due to the fact that it does not involve radiation, has an ability to visualize non-ossified cartilaginous and vascular structures, allows dynamic imaging and quick contralateral comparison. US is the primary imaging modality in some pediatric MSK conditions like infant hip in developmental dysplasia (DDH), hip joint effusion, epiphyseal trauma and evaluation of the neonatal spine. US is the modality of choice in infants with DDH, both in the initial evaluation and post-treatment follow-up. US has a sensitivity equivalent to MRI in evaluation of the neonatal spine in experienced hands and is a good screening modality in neonates with suspected occult neural tube defects. In other MSK applications, it is often used for the initial diagnosis or in addition to other imaging modalities. In trauma and infections, US can often detect early and subtle soft tissue abnormalities and a quick comparison with the contralateral side aids in diagnoses. Dynamic imaging is crucial in evaluating congenital instabilities and dislocations, soft tissue and ligamentous injuries, epiphyseal injuries and fracture separations. High-resolution imaging along with color Doppler (CD) is useful in the characterization of soft tissue masses. This article reviews the applications of US in pediatric MSK with emphasis on conditions where it is a primary modality. Limitations of US include inability to penetrate bone, hence, limited diagnosis of intraosseous pathology and operator dependency.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · The Indian Journal of Pediatrics
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Cartilage-hair hypoplasia is an autosomal recessive disorder, characterized by short stature, metaphyseal dysplasia, hypotrichosis and immunodeficiency. More than 90 different biallelic mutations in RMRP gene have been identified to cause this condition. Three cases previously reported from India showed novel mutations in RMRP gene. The authors report two unrelated cases with the more common g.70A > G mutation, stressing the need to screen for this mutation in Indian population having features of cartilage-hair hypoplasia.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · The Indian Journal of Pediatrics
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Objective: To identify the prevalence and risk factors for secondary hyperparathyroidism in children with advanced stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Methods: A retrospective cross-sectional observational study of clinical and laboratory data of pediatric patients with CKD stage 3, 4 was conducted from 2005 through 2013 at a single center in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Results: One hundred nineteen children (60.5 % boys) with mean age of 10.1 ± 5.1 y were included in the study. The mean eGFR (estimated Glomerular Filtration Rate) was 18.3 ± 15.4 ml/min/1.73m(2) and the mean intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH) level was 62.2 ± 89.4 pmol/L. Patients with a high iPTH had lower eGFR than those who were euparathyroid (16 ± 13.4 vs. 29.7 ± 19 ml/min/1.73m(2), respectively; p = 0.006), had lower calcium levels (2.2 ± 0.3 vs. 2.4 ± 0.3 mmol/L; p = 0.03) and a lower bicarbonate level (21.2 ± 4.2 vs. 23.3 ± 3.2 mmol/L; p = 0.04). Three children with hyperparthyrodism (4.9 %) had fractures, 16 (26.2 %) had bone deformities compared to 5 in the euoparathyroid group (p = 0.012). Parathyroid hormone negatively correlated with the patient's eGFR (r = -0.55), serum calcium (r = -0.43), and positively correlated with serum phosphate (r = 0.38). Conclusions: The single most important predictor of hyperparathyroidism in children in the present sample was eGFR.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · The Indian Journal of Pediatrics

  • No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · The Indian Journal of Pediatrics
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Systemic autoinflammatory diseases are rare disorders of innate immunity which usually present in childhood with recurrent or continuous attacks of fever and systemic inflammation. The discovery of the genetic defect underlying Familial Mediterranean fever in 1997 has proved exceptionally informative about the innate immune system and the regulation of pro inflammatory cytokines particularly IL-1. Although extremely rare, systemic autoinflammatory diseases are important to recognise as many can now be completely controlled by long term drug therapies. Diagnosis relies on clinical suspicion followed by genetic testing. This review will focus on the main systemic autoinflammatory diseases.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · The Indian Journal of Pediatrics

  • No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · The Indian Journal of Pediatrics
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological disorders in childhood. Epilepsy associated with global developmental delay and cognitive dysfunction is defined as epileptic encephalopathy. Certain inherited metabolic disorders presenting with epileptic encephalopathy can be treated with disease specific diet, vitamin, amino acid or cofactor supplementations. In those disorders, disease specific therapy is successful to achieve good seizure control and improve long-term neurodevelopmental outcome. For this reason, intractable epilepsy with global developmental delay or history of developmental regression warrants detailed metabolic investigations for the possibility of an underlying treatable inherited metabolic disorder, which should be undertaken as first line investigations. An underlying genetic etiology in epileptic encephalopathy has been supported by recent studies such as array comparative genomic hybridization, targeted next generation sequencing panels, whole exome and whole genome sequencing. These studies report a diagnostic yield up to 70%, depending on the applied genetic testing as well as number of patients enrolled. In patients with epileptic encephalopathy, a stepwise approach for diagnostic work-up will help to diagnose treatable inherited metabolic disorders quickly. Application of detailed genetic investigations such as targeted next generation sequencing as second line and whole exome sequencing as third line testing will diagnose underlying genetic disease which will help for genetic counseling as well as guide for prenatal diagnosis. Knowledge of underlying genetic cause will provide novel insights into the pathogenesis of epileptic encephalopathy and pave the ground towards the development of targeted neuroprotective treatment strategies to improve the health outcome of children with epileptic encephalopathy.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · The Indian Journal of Pediatrics
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Skeletal dysplasias are disorders of bone formation. There are many dysplasias that have been identified and studied over the years and long lists of radiological features have been documented; it is not possible to remember all of them, most of which are common to more than one dysplasia. This article is about a practical approach to the radiological diagnosis of skeletal dysplasias by viewing only a few radiographs rather than the entire skeletal survey. The radiographs that are to be studied are AP view of the pelvis, dorsolumbar spine– AP and lateral view and both hands PA view, in that order. The skull lateral view and both knees AP view are sometimes required. The authors advice to set out with the pelvis that provides information of not only the pelvic bones but also parts of the lumbar spine and the upper ends of the femur including their epiphyses, metaphyses and a part of the diaphyses. Sometimes the diagnosis is reached with only this one radiograph, as in achondroplasia or it may indicate a group like mucopolysaccharidoses which can be sorted out with radiographs of the spine and hands or the upper part of the femur can provide a cue to epiphyseal and metaphyseal dysplasias. Gamuts and atlases can be consulted for the rare dysplasias.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · The Indian Journal of Pediatrics
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Objective To analyze the clinical and imagenological characteristics of acute Exogenous lipoid pneumonia (ELP), explore its risk factors, and assess the potential role of multiple bronchoalveolar lavages (BALs) and steroid therapy in the treatment of children with acute ELP. Methods Between May 2011 and July 2014, 33 pediatric patients with pneumonia caused by aspiration of oil-based substances were admitted to the Guangzhou Women and Children’s Medical Center, Guangdong, China. Data on the demographics of these patients, as well as that on clinical presentations, imagenological characteristics, history of ingestion, laboratory observations, treatment protocol, response to therapy, BAL findings, and treatment outcomes were collected. Results The study group consisted of 23 boys (69.7 %) and 10 girls (30.3 %), with ages ranging from 4 mo to 4 y. They were admitted to the hospital 2 h to 13 d after ingesting the oil-based substance. By the time of admission, most patients presented with respiratory distress and other symptoms, including tachypnea (n = 21), cough (n = 25), mild fever (n = 18), progressive dyspnea (n = 12), and pneumorrhagia (n = 5); six patients received mechanical ventilation because of complicated respiratory distress syndrome. The most common laboratory observations were leukocytosis (25 of 33, 75.8 %), neutrophilia (23 of 33, 69.7 %), and anemia (8 of 33, 24.2 %). Serum biochemical examination showed elevated sedimentation rates (24 of 33, 72.7 %), lactate dehydrogenase levels (18 of 33, 54.5 %), and C-reactive protein levels (17 of 33, 51.5 %). The most common finding on computed tomography (CT) scans was areas of consolidation. Within the follow-up duration of 2 wk to 6 mo, all patients with clinical symptoms of ELP experienced remission, and none died. The CT scans of most of the cases were normal by 1 to 3 mo, except for two patients who showed complete improvement 6 mo after treatment. Conclusions It was found that multiple BALs combined with steroid therapy result in significant improvement of clinical, radiologic, and laboratory parameters in children with acute ELP. Further, some traditional practices may predispose children to ELP, even in the absence of underlying risk factors. Finally, pneumorrhagia and acute respiratory distress syndrome may be the main complications of acute ELP in children.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · The Indian Journal of Pediatrics
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Objectives To determine serum levels of basic fibroblastic growth factor (b-FGF) in hemangioma patients under 2 y of age. Methods The study group consisted of 43 children with infantile hemangioma and b-FGF levels were analyzed using ELISA. Results The serum b-FGF levels were higher in hemangioma patients than in healthy control individuals (p 0.01). There were no differences between the lesion size, number of lesions, patient age and serum b-FGF levels. Conclusions Thus, b-FGF is an important growth factor that plays a central role in hemangioma, but determining b-FGF serum levels was not helpful in distinguishing between patients who require treatment and those who do not.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · The Indian Journal of Pediatrics

  • No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · The Indian Journal of Pediatrics