Harvard educational review (HARVARD EDUC REV)

Publisher: Howard Eugene Wilson; Harvard University. Graduate School of Education

Journal description

The Harvard Educational Review is a scholarly journal of opinion and research in education. Its mission is to provide an interdisciplinary forum for discussion and debate about education's most vital issues. Since its founding in 1930, the Review has become one of the most prestigious journals in education, with circulation to policymakers, researchers, administrators, and teachers. Each year, the Review covers a wide range of topics of current concern in education. Each quarterly issue of the Review is book length, containing a variety of articles, essays, and book reviews.

Current impact factor: 0.70

Impact Factor Rankings

2016 Impact Factor Available summer 2017
2009 Impact Factor 0.702

Additional details

5-year impact 1.69
Cited half-life >10.0
Immediacy index 0.02
Eigenfactor 0.00
Article influence 0.67
Website Harvard Educational Review website
Other titles Education past and present., Harvard educational review
ISSN 0017-8055
OCLC 1587741
Material type Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Internet Resource, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In this article, Shaun R. Harper investigates how Black undergraduate men respond to and resist the internalization of racist stereotypes at predominantly White colleges and universities. Prior studies consistently show that racial stereotypes are commonplace on many campuses, that their effects are usually psychologically and academically hazardous, and that Black undergraduate men are often among the most stereotyped populations in higher education and society. The threat of confirming stereotypes has been shown to undermine academic performance and persistence for Blacks and other minoritized students. To learn more about those who succeed in postsecondary contexts where they are routinely stereotyped, Harper conducted interviews with Black male achievers at thirty predominantly White colleges and universities. His findings show that these undergraduate men were frequently confronted with stereotypes but succeeded in resisting them through their campus leadership roles, their engagement in student organizations, and their use of a three-step strategic redirection process. Communication and confrontation skills acquired through out-of-class engagement enabled participants to effectively resist the harmful threat of racial stereotypes encountered in classrooms.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Harvard educational review
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    ABSTRACT: In this article, Michelle J. Bellino explores contrasting approaches to civic education in two rural schools serving indigenous Maya youth in post civil war Guatemala. Through comparative ethnography, she examines how youth civic pathways intersect with legacies of authoritarianism while young people shape their identity as members of historically oppressed groups. She suggests that student decisions about how and when to participate in civic issues function as a risk calculus, taking into consideration the costs and benefits of both participation and nonparticipation as well as the civic obligation to abstain or join communities in struggle. Although serving similarly impoverished communities hard-hit by state actors during the war and now struggling with issues of indigenous autonomy, both schools position daily experiences with injustice as an entry point for constructing youth citizenship. Beyond this shared experience of historical injustice and its ongoing effects, educators envision young peoples' roles according to different risk structures. In this way, youth construct civic pathways while traversing between the potential for risk and reward, in part informed by their experiences in school.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Harvard educational review
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    ABSTRACT: In this article, Uma M. Jayakumar investigates the cumulative impact of experiences with segregation or racial diversity prior to and during college on colorblind ideological orientation among white adults. An analysis of longitudinal data spanning ten years reveals that, for whites from segregated and diverse childhood neighborhoods, some experiences in college may increase colorblind thinking, while others may facilitate a greater understanding of the racial context of US society. Segregated white environments, or white habitus, before, during, and after college are associated with whites' colorblind ideological orientations, with negative implications for racial justice. Campus racial diversity experiences can play a role in diminishing the influence of white habitus but are not necessarily doing so. In other words, the challenges of addressing colorblind orientation are greater for white students from segregated neighborhoods and high schools who also tend to choose segregated white campus environments and are less likely to engage across race lines while in college. This study speaks to the need for more direct interventions addressing colorblind ideology among white college students. The findings suggest that racial diversity and integration are potentially disruptive but insufficient conditions for unlearning harmful colorblind frames.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Harvard educational review
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    ABSTRACT: In this article, Leslie Duhaylongsod, Catherine E. Snow, Robert L. Selman, and M. Suzanne Donovan describe the principles behind the design of curricular units that offer disciplinary literacy support in the subject of history for middle school students who represent a wide range of reading levels, and for their teachers, whose own subject matter expertise in history varies. The authors elucidate the theory of change from which the design principles derive and reveal dilemmas they faced in enacting disciplinary literacy when adhering to these principles. They use transcripts from classrooms implementing the curriculum to show instances of students demonstrating key skills approximating those used by historians, despite some compromises with authentic historical scholarship in the curriculum itself By offering high-interest materials, opportunities to connect history to student experiences, and active classroom discussions and debates over historical controversies, the Social Studies Generation (SoGen) history curriculum, a part of the multidisciplinary Word Generation program, is an attempt to reconcile the tension between maintaining high student engagement with history and inducting students into the complex work of real historians.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Harvard educational review
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    ABSTRACT: What does cultural capital mean in a transnational context? In this article, Cati Coe and Serah Shani illustrate through the case of Ghanaian immigrants to the United States that the concept of cultural capital offers many insights into immigrants' parenting strategies, but that it also needs to be refined in several ways to account for the transnational context in which migrants and their children operate. The authors argue that, for many immigrants, the folk model of success means that they seek for their children skills, knowledge, and ways of being in the world that are widely valued in the multiple contexts in which they operate. For Ghanaian migrants, parenting includes using social and institutional resources from Ghana as well as the United States. The multiplicity and contradictions in cultural capital across different social fields complicate their parenting "projects" and raise questions about the reproduction of social class through the intergenerational transmission of cultural capital.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Harvard educational review

  • No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · Harvard educational review
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    ABSTRACT: In this essay, Ruben Elias Canedo Sanchez and Meng L. So share the history and development of the Undocumented Student Program at the University of California, Berkeley. In describing the creation of the program, the authors offer reflections on the strategies employed to holistically support undocumented students' success on campus. By drawing on their experiences as both students and program leaders, they highlight key lessons on how universities can garner institutional resources, build staff capacity, and develop nontraditional allies for undocumented students.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · Harvard educational review

  • No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · Harvard educational review

  • No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · Harvard educational review

  • No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · Harvard educational review
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    ABSTRACT: In this ethnographic study, Elaine C. Allard describes and analyzes the characteristics and experiences of undocumented newcomer adolescents attending a US suburban high school. She considers the ways in which newcomer adolescents show agency in their border crossing, prioritize work over formal education, and express transnational identities. She contrasts their experience with the predominant narrative of DREAMers, undocumented childhood arrivals who are often characterized as migrating to the United States "through no fault of their own," who prioritize professional aspirations through schooling, and who are "American in spirit." Allard calls attention to a subgroup of undocumented students who may benefit from different approaches by educators and immigrant advocates.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · Harvard educational review
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    ABSTRACT: In this article, Dafney Blanca Dabach investigates how teachers and their students of different citizenship statuses navigate tensions in formal state-sponsored citizenship education. In traditional US high school civics courses, undocumented immigrant youths' liminal status is often invisible and overlooked as undocumented youth are educated alongside their peers who have full citizenship rights. Disjunctures between idealized rights and structural exclusions become barriers to meaningful civic education. Through this qualitative case study, Dabach examines the possibilities of a teacher's brokering role across different forms of knowledge and experience in a classroom that included undocumented immigrants, naturalized immigrants, and US-born students whose parental origins spanned twelve countries across five continents. She asks: How do civics teachers who are aware of their students' varied citizenship statuses discuss political participation in mixed-status classrooms during nationally focused events, such as elections? And, how do students of differing citizenship statuses respond during such times? Dabach demonstrates how the teacher apprenticed youth into practices of political participation while recounting narratives about the impact of immigration deportation policies at the local school site. In doing so, the teacher breached norms of silence, interrupting norms that contribute to maintaining status quo exclusions. This case study documents how the teacher simultaneously socialized youth of different citizenship statuses in ways that they found meaningful across citizenship types. This work contributes to conceptualizing how civic education may be more inclusive in the face of systematic exclusions.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · Harvard educational review
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    ABSTRACT: In this reflective essay, Alberto Ledesma explores how being undocumented can produce a particular form of writer's block. He argues that there is a pattern of predictable silences and obfuscations inherent in all undocumented immigrant autobiographies that cannot be easily negotiated when undocumented students are asked to write about "their experiences." Ledesma contends that these patterns of silences often manifest as apparent rhetorical or mechanical errors in academic prose rather than intentional obfuscations meant to protect the writer's undocumented identity from being discovered. Reflecting on his own life experiences as a former undocumented student, Ledesma highlights that, paradoxically, the lifelong conditioning in silence may also interfere when undocumented writers are ready to render their authentic stories in public.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · Harvard educational review

  • No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · Harvard educational review
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    ABSTRACT: In this article, Roberto G. Gonzales, Luisa L. Heredia, and Genevieve NegronGonzales present a nuanced assessment of how undocumented immigrant students in the United States experience the public educational system. Though the landmark 1982 Supreme Court ruling Plyler v. Doe has resulted in hundreds of thousands of undocumented children being educated in US K-12 schools, much of Plyler's promise still eludes them. Drawing data from multiple studies conducted with undocumented youth in California, the authors argue that schools perform three critical social functions-as integrators, as constructors of citizenship, and as facilitators of public and community engagement-that shape the educational experiences and political and civic participation of undocumented immigrant youth. They suggest that while schools hold the potential to engender a sense of belonging and membership for undocumented immigrant students, they often fall short of this promise. The authors argue that constrained resources in school districts that serve large concentrations of students of color, school structures that sort and deprioritize students in lower academic tracks, and modes of civic education that do not allow undocumented students to participate equally in society or view themselves as equal members of the citizenry limit the potential for schools to create positive educational and civic experiences for undocumented youth. In addition to inequalities in the educational system, undocumented students' immigration status constrains their interaction in each school function, limiting the realization of Plyler's promise.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · Harvard educational review
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    ABSTRACT: In this photo essay, Cristina Llerena Navarro captures moments in the everyday lives of mixed-status families. Through her narrative and images, Llerena shares the stories of these families, their journeys to the United States as well as the consequences of deportation on the family unity. She evokes the children's deep yearning to be reunited with their families on American soil, the parents' determination to provide their children with lives better than their own, and the realities of current immigration policy in preventing the fulfillment of these dreams.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · Harvard educational review
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    ABSTRACT: In this essay, Elizabeth Birr Moje argues that educators can make radical change in student learning and well-being if they reframe teachers' work with youth as less about meeting standards and more about teaching youth to navigate the multiple literacy contexts in which they live, learn, and work. To that end, Moje offers a take on disciplinary literacy instruction that puts the process of inquiry at its center. In contrast to a frame that ignores or removes value, purpose, affect, emotion, imagination, social interaction, and the learning and challenging of cultural conventions from the work of adolescent literacy teaching, she presents a teaching heuristic designed to capitalize on the social and cultural nature of disciplinary inquiry and support students in navigating multiple literacy contexts as part of the teaching of disciplinary literacy, characterized by what she terms the 4Es: engage, elicit/engineer, examine, and evaluate.
    No preview · Article · Jun 2015 · Harvard educational review

  • No preview · Article · Jun 2015 · Harvard educational review