Diseases of the Colon & Rectum (DIS COLON RECTUM)

Publisher: American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons; American Proctologic Society, Springer Verlag

Journal description

Diseases of the Colon and Rectum is published monthly for the American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons. It is designed for the publication of original papers that constitute significant contributions to the advancement of knowledge within the special field designated by the name of this journal. Discontinued in 2004.


Journal Impact: 0.27*

*This value is calculated using ResearchGate data and is based on average citation counts from work published in this journal. The data used in the calculation may not be exhaustive.

Journal impact history

2016 Journal impact Available summer 2017
2015 Journal impact 0.27
2014 Journal impact 0.29
2013 Journal impact 0.15
2012 Journal impact 0.07
2011 Journal impact 0.19
2010 Journal impact 1.00
2009 Journal impact 2.03
2008 Journal impact 2.12
2007 Journal impact 2.16
2006 Journal impact 1.79
2005 Journal impact 1.79
2004 Journal impact 2.30
2003 Journal impact 2.17
2002 Journal impact 1.84
2001 Journal impact 1.65
2000 Journal impact 1.40

Journal impact over time

Journal impact
Year

Additional details

Cited half-life 9.80
Immediacy index 0.48
Eigenfactor 0.02
Article influence 1.17
Website Diseases of the Colon & Rectum website
Other titles Diseases of the colon & rectum, Diseases of the colon and rectum
ISSN 0012-3706
OCLC 1566768
Material type Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Journal / Magazine / Newspaper, Internet Resource

Publisher details

This journal may support self-archiving.
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Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Abstract BACKGROUND: Previous studies using PET/CT imaging have failed to accurately identify complete responders to neoadjuvant chemoradiation among patients with rectal cancer. The use of metabolic parameters alone or imprecise delineation of baseline and residual tumor volumes may have contributed for these disappointing findings. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to determine the accuracy of complete response identification in rectal cancer after neoadjuvant chemoradiation by sequential PET/CT imaging with a decrease in tumor metabolism and volume using optimal tumor volume delineation. DESIGN: This was a retrospective comparison of prospectively collected data from a clinical trial (National Clinical Trial 00254683). SETTINGS: The study was conducted at a single research center. PATIENTS: Ninety patients with cT2-4N0-2M0 distal rectal cancer underwent sequential PET/CT at baseline and 12 weeks after neoadjuvant chemoradiation. Quantitative metabolic analysis (median and maximal standard uptake values), volumetric estimates (metabolic tumor volume), and composite estimates incorporating volume and quantitative data (total lesion glycolysis) were compared for the assessment of response to neoadjuvant chemoradiation using receiver operating characteristic curves. Individual standard uptake value thresholds were used according to response to neoadjuvant chemoradiation to match metabolic activity and optimize volume delineation. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The accuracy of complete response identification by multiple volumetric and metabolic parameters using sequential PET/CT imaging was measured. RESULTS: Variation in total lesion glycolysis between baseline and 12-week PET/CT scans was associated with the best area under the curve (area under the curve = 0.81 (95% CI, 0.69-0.92)) when compared with standard uptake value or metabolic tumor volume for the identification of a complete responder. Patients with a ≥92% decrease in total lesion glycolysis between baseline and 12-week PET/CT scan had a 90% chance to harbor complete response. LIMITATIONS: This study was limited by its lack of interobserver agreement analysis. CONCLUSIONS: PET/CT scan using volume and metabolic estimates with individual standard uptake value thresholds for volume determination may provide a useful tool to predict response to neoadjuvant chemoradiation in distal rectal cancer.
    Article · Sep 2016 · Diseases of the Colon & Rectum
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Background: Juvenile polyps in the large bowel are rare but the most common type of polyp in children. The prevalence and incidence are unknown, and few studies exist on the occurrence in adults. They are considered not to harbor any malignant potential unless they are part of the hereditary juvenile polyposis syndrome. Objective: We aimed to study the demographics of juvenile polyps in Denmark in a 20-year period from 1995 to 2015 in both adults and children. This is the first report on the occurrence, anatomic localization, and reoccurrence of these polyps in a whole population. Design: Data from all of the patients who had been diagnosed with 1 or more juvenile polyp from January 1, 1995, until December 31, 2014, were obtained. Settings: The study was conducted based on patients registered in the nationwide pathological register in Denmark, the Danish Pathology Data Bank. Patients: We detected a total of 1772 patients who had 2108 juvenile polyps removed (male = 946; female = 826). Main outcome measures: We noted the sex, age, number, reoccurrence, and localization of polyps. Results: Of the detected juvenile polyps ≈75% were detected in adults and ≈25% in children. Approximately 96% of the patients had a single juvenile polyp without reoccurrence, 1% fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for juvenile polyposis syndrome (more than 5 polyps), and 5% had multiple juvenile polyps (2-5 polyps). The incidence in the Danish population can be estimated to be between 1:45,000 and 1:65,000. Limitations: Miscoding or misclassification in the register cannot be ruled out. We only have data for the 20-year period, limiting the evaluation of reoccurrence, and no data for the endoscopic removal procedures. Conclusions: We conclude that juvenile polyps are rare, with the majority found in adults, and most often found as a single juvenile polyp. A subgroup of patients have juvenile polyposis syndrome, which requires follow-up.
    Article · Aug 2016 · Diseases of the Colon & Rectum
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Background: Although self-expandable metal stents are used as a bridge to surgery in patients with colorectal cancer obstruction, their long-term oncological outcomes are unclear. Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate long-term oncological outcomes of self-expandable metal stents as a bridge to surgery (stent group) compared with direct surgery (direct operation group) in patients with left-sided colorectal cancer obstruction. Design: This was a retrospective chart review. Settings: This study was conducted at a single tertiary academic center. Patients: Of 113 patients who underwent curative surgery for left-sided colorectal cancer obstruction at Asan Medical Center between 2005 and 2011, 42 underwent direct surgery and 71 underwent self-expandable metal stent insertion followed by elective surgery. After 1:1 propensity-score matching, 42 patients were enrolled in both groups, and their postsurgical outcomes were compared. Main outcome measures: The primary outcomes of this study were long-term oncological outcomes, including overall survival and recurrence-free survival of patients in both groups. Results: Three- and 5-year overall survival rates were similar in the stent (87.0% and 71.0%) and direct operation (76.4% and 76.4%) groups (p = 0.931). Three- and 5-year recurrence-free survival rates were also similar in the stent (91.9% and 66.4%) and direct operation (81.2% and 71.2%) groups (p = 0.581), as were postsurgical complication rates (9.5% and 16.7%; p = 0.344). No patient in either group experienced a permanent stoma. Limitations: This study was limited by its small patient numbers and retrospective nature. Conclusions: The long-term oncological outcomes of self-expandable metal stents as a bridge to surgery may not be inferior to those of direct surgery for left-sided colorectal cancer obstruction.
    Article · Aug 2016 · Diseases of the Colon & Rectum
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Background: The vascular anatomy in the right colon varies; however, related studies are rare, especially on the laparoscopic vascular anatomy of living patients. Objective: The purpose of this study was to describe vascular variations around the gastrocolic trunk, middle colic vein, and ileocolic vessels in laparoscopic surgery for right-sided colon cancer. Design: This is a retrospective descriptive study of patients undergoing laparoscopic colectomy for right colon cancer. Settings: The study was conducted at a single tertiary institution in Korea. Patients: Consecutive patients with right colon cancer who underwent laparoscopic right colectomy using the cranial-to-caudal approach (N = 116) between January 2014 and April 2015 were included. Main outcome measures: Three colorectal surgeons took photographs and videos of the vascular anatomy during each laparoscopic right colectomy, and these were analyzed for vascular variations. Results: We classified venous variations around the gastrocolic trunk into 2 types (3 subtypes), type 1 (n = 92 (79.3%)), defined as 1 or 2 colic veins draining into the gastrocolic trunk, and type II (n = 24 (20.7%)), defined as having no gastrocolic trunk. We also investigated the tributaries of the superior mesenteric vein. One, 2, and 3 middle colic veins were found in 86 (74.1%), 26 (22.4%), and 4 patients (3.5%). The right colic vein drained directly into the superior mesenteric vein in 22 patients (19.0%). All of the patients had a single ileocolic vein draining into the superior mesenteric vein and a single ileocolic artery from the superior mesenteric artery. The right colic artery from the superior mesenteric artery was present in 38 patients (32.7%). The ileocolic artery passed the superior mesenteric vein anteriorly or posteriorly in 58 patients (50%) each. Limitations: Unlike cadaver or radiological studies, we could not clarify the complete vessel paths. Conclusions: We classified vascular anatomic variations in laparoscopic colectomy for right colon cancer, which could be helpful for colorectal surgeons.
    Article · Aug 2016 · Diseases of the Colon & Rectum
  • Article · Aug 2016 · Diseases of the Colon & Rectum
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Background: The prognosis of rectal cancer is directly related to the stage of the tumor at diagnosis. Accurate preoperative staging is essential for selecting patients to receive optimal treatment. Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic performance of MRI in tumor staging and circumferential resection margin involvement in rectal cancer. Data sources: A systematic literature search was performed in MEDLINE, EMBASE, PubMed, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and Web of Science database. Study selection: Original articles from 2000 to 2016 on the diagnostic performance of MRI in the staging of rectal cancer and/or assessment of mesorectal fascia status were eligible. Main outcome measures: Pooled diagnostic statistics including sensitivity, specificity, positive likelihood ratio, and negative likelihood ratio were calculated for invasion of muscularis propria, perirectal tissue, and adjacent organs and for circumferential resection margin involvement through bivariate random-effects modeling. Summary receiver operating characteristic curves were fitted, and areas under summary receiver operating characteristic curves were counted to evaluate the diagnostic performance of MRI for each outcome. Results: Thirty-five studies were eligible for this meta-analysis. Preoperative MRI revealed the highest sensitivity of 0.97 (95% CI, 0.96-0.98) and specificity of 0.97 (95% CI, 0.96-0.98) for muscularis propria invasion and adjacent organ invasion. Areas under summary receiver operating characteristic curves indicated good diagnostic accuracy for each outcome, with the highest of 0.9515 for the assessment of adjacent organ invasion. Significant heterogeneity existed among studies. There was no notable publication bias for each outcome. Limitations: This meta-analysis revealed relatively high diagnostic accuracy for preoperative MRI, although significant heterogeneity existed. Therefore, exploration should be focused on standardized interpretation criteria and optimal MRI protocols for future studies. Conclusions: MRI showed relatively high diagnostic accuracy for preoperative T staging and circumferential resection margin assessment and should be reliable for clinical decision making.
    Article · Aug 2016 · Diseases of the Colon & Rectum
  • Article · Aug 2016 · Diseases of the Colon & Rectum
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Background: Despite numerous trials assessing optimal antibiotic prophylaxis strategies for colorectal surgery, few studies have assessed real-world practice on a national scale with respect to risk of surgical site infections. Objective: Using a large national claims database we aimed to describe current use of prophylactic antibiotics (type and duration) and associations with surgical site infection after open colectomies. Design: This was a retrospective study using the Premier Perspective database. Settings: Included were patient hospitalizations nationwide from January 2006 to December 2013. Patients: A total of 90,725 patients who underwent an open colectomy in 445 different hospitals were included in the study. Main outcome measures: Multilevel, multivariable logistic regressions measured associations between surgical site infection and type of antibiotic used and duration (day of surgery only, day of surgery and the day after, and >1 day after surgery). Results: Overall surgical site infection prevalence was 5.2% (n = 4750). Most patients (41.8%) received cefoxitin for prophylaxis; other choices were ertapenem (18.2%), cefotetan (10.3%), metronidazole with cefazolin (9.9%), and ampicillin with sulbactam (7.6%), whereas 12.2% received other antibiotics. Distribution of prophylaxis duration was 51.6%, 28.5%, and 19.9% for day of surgery only, day of surgery and the day after, and >1 day after surgery, respectively. Compared with cefoxitin, lower odds for surgical site infection were observed for ampicillin with sulbactam (OR = 0.71 (95% CI, 0.63-0.82)), ertapenem (OR = 0.65 (95% CI, 0.58-0.71)), metronidazole with cefazolin (OR = 0.56 (95% CI, 0.49-0.64)), and "other" (OR = 0.81 (95% CI, 0.73-0.90)); duration was not significantly associated with altered odds for surgical site infection. Sensitivity analyses supported the main findings. Limitations: The study was limited by its lack of detailed clinical information in the billing data set used. Conclusions: In this national study assessing real-world use of prophylactic antibiotics in open colectomies, the type of antibiotic used appeared to be associated with up to 44% decreased odds for surgical site infections. Although there are numerous trials on optimal prophylactic strategies, studies that particularly focus on factors that influence the choice of prophylactic antibiotic might provide insights into ways of reducing the burden of surgical site infections in colorectal surgeries.
    Article · Aug 2016 · Diseases of the Colon & Rectum
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Background: The impact of the specific incision used for specimen extraction during laparoscopic colorectal surgery on incisional hernia rates relative to other contributing factors remains unclear. Objective: This study aimed to assess the relationship between extraction-site location and incisional hernia after laparoscopic colorectal surgery. Design: This was a retrospective cohort study (January 2000 through December 2011). Settings: The study was conducted at a high-volume, specialized colorectal surgery department. Patients: All of the patients undergoing elective laparoscopic colorectal resection were identified from our prospectively maintained institutional database. Main outcome measures: Extraction-site and port-site incisional hernias clinically detected by physician or detected on CT scan were collected. Converted cases, defined as the use of a midline incision to perform the operation, were kept in the intent-to-treat analysis. Specific extraction-site groups were compared, and other relevant factors associated with incisional hernia rates were also evaluated with univariate and multivariate analyses. Results: A total of 2148 patients (54.0% with abdominal and 46.0% with pelvic operations) with a mean age of 51.7 ± 18.2 years (52% women) were reviewed. Used extraction sites were infraumbilical midline (23.7%), stoma site/right or left lower quadrant (15%), periumbilical midline (22.5%), and Pfannenstiel (29.6%) and midline converted (9.2%). Overall crude extraction site incisional hernia rate during a mean follow-up of 5.9 ± 3.0 years was 7.2% (n = 155). Extraction-site incisional hernia crude rates were highest after periumbilical midline (12.6%) and a midline incision used for conversion to open surgery (12.0%). Independent factors associated with extraction-site incisional hernia were any extraction sites compared with Pfannenstiel (periumbilical midline HR = 12.7; midline converted HR = 13.1; stoma site HR = 28.4; p < 0.001 for each), increased BMI (HR = 1.23; p = 0.002), synchronous port-site hernias (HR = 3.66; p < 0.001), and postoperative superficial surgical-site infection (HR = 2.11; p < 0.001). Limitations: This study was limited by its retrospective nature, incisional hernia diagnoses based on clinical examination, and heterogeneous surgical population. Conclusions: Preferential extraction sites to minimize incisional hernia rates should be Pfannenstiel or incisions off the midline. Midline incisions should be avoided when possible.
    Article · Aug 2016 · Diseases of the Colon & Rectum
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Background: Patients with locally advanced rectal cancer typically receive neoadjuvant chemoradiation followed by total mesorectal excision. Other treatment approaches, including transanal techniques and close surveillance, are becoming increasingly common following positive responses to chemoradiation. Lack of pathologic lymph node staging is one major disadvantage of these novel strategies. Objective: The purposes of this study were to determine clinicopathologic factors associated with positive lymph nodes following neoadjuvant chemoradiation for rectal cancer and to create a nomogram using these factors to predict rates of lymph node positivity. Design: This is a retrospective cohort analysis. Settings: This study used the National Cancer Database. Patients: Patients aged 18 to 90 with clinical stage T3/T4, N0, M0 or Tany, N1-2, M0 adenocarcinoma of the rectum who underwent neoadjuvant chemoradiation before total mesorectal excision from 2010 to 2012 were identified. Main outcome measures: The primary outcome measure was lymph node positivity after neoadjuvant chemoradiation for locally advanced rectal cancer. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were used to determine the associations of clinicopathologic variables with lymph node positivity. Results: Eight thousand nine hundred eighty-four patients were included. Young age, lower Charlson score, mucinous histology, poorly differentiated and undifferentiated tumors, the presence of lymphovascular invasion, elevated CEA level, and clinical lymph node positivity were significantly predictive of pathologic lymph node positivity following neoadjuvant chemoradiation. The predictive accuracy of the nomogram is 70.9%, with a c index of 0.71. There was minimal deviation between the predicted and observed outcomes. Limitations: This study is retrospective, and it cannot be determined when in the course of treatment the data were collected. Conclusions: We created a nomogram to predict lymph node positivity following neoadjuvant chemoradiation for locally advanced rectal cancer that can serve as a valuable complement to imaging to aid clinicians and patients in determining the best treatment strategy.
    Article · Aug 2016 · Diseases of the Colon & Rectum
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Background: The rates of laparoscopic colectomy for colon cancer have steadily increased since its inception. Laparoscopic colectomy currently accounts for a third of colectomy procedures in the United States, but little is known regarding the spatial pattern of the utilization of laparoscopy for colon cancer. Objective: This study evaluated the utilization of laparoscopy for colon cancer at the neighborhood level in Ontario. Design: Retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data was performed. Setting: This study was conducted at all hospitals in the province of Ontario. Patients: This population-based study included all patients aged ≥18 who received an elective colectomy for colon cancer from April 2008 until March 2012 in the province of Ontario. Main outcome measures: The primary outcome measure was the neighborhood rates of laparoscopy. Results: Overall, 9,969 patients underwent surgery, and the cluster analysis identified 74 cold-spot neighborhoods, representing 1.8 million people, or 14% of the population. In the multivariate analysis, patients from rural neighborhoods were less than half as likely to receive laparoscopy, OR 0.44 (95% CI, 0.24-0.84; p = 0.012). Additionally, having a minimally invasive surgery fellowship training facility within the same administrative health region as the neighborhood made it more than 23 times as likely to be a hot spot, OR 25.88 (95% CI, 12.15-55.11; p < 0.001). Neighborhood socioeconomic status was not associated with variation in the utilization of laparoscopy. Limitations: Patient case mix could affect laparoscopy use. Conclusion and relevance: This study identified an unequal utilization of laparoscopy for colon cancer within Ontario with rural neighborhoods experiencing low rates of laparoscopic colectomy, whereas neighborhoods in the same administrative region as minimally invasive surgery training centers experienced increased utilization. Further study into the causes of this variation in resource allocation is needed to identify ways to improve more efficient spread of knowledge and technical skills advancement.
    Article · Aug 2016 · Diseases of the Colon & Rectum
  • Article · Aug 2016 · Diseases of the Colon & Rectum
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Background: Confusion exists regarding the clinical significance of the deep posterior intersphincteric space and deep postanal space to complex perianal fistulas. Objective: The purpose of this study was to assess the clinical significance of the 2 deep posterior perianal spaces and to describe in detail the courses of posterior complex cryptoglandular fistula extensions. Design: This was a retrospective study. MRI-based characteristics of selected perianal fistulas were independently evaluated by examiners who focused on lesions in these 2 spaces and were blinded to each other's findings. Settings: This study was conducted in the colorectal surgery and radiology departments of a large university teaching hospital in China. Patients: Included in the study were patients who underwent pelvic MRI for posterior perianal fistula between October 2012 and December 2014. Main outcome measures: The occurrence rates of these 2 deep perianal space lesions in posterior cryptoglandular fistulas were determined. Results: A total of 513 primary posterior cryptoglandular fistulas were identified in 508 patients, including 167 deep posterior intersphincteric space lesions (32.6%) and 23 deep postanal space lesions (4.5%). Of those, 173 fistulas (33.7%) were evaluated as complex. The former and latter spaces were involved in 79.2% (137/173) and 13.3% (23/173) of posterior complex fistulas. Compared with deep postanal space lesions, deep posterior intersphincteric space lesions were more common in cases with high transsphincteric or suprasphincteric fistulas (80.1% vs 15.8%), synchronous multiple transsphincteric fistulas (82.4% vs 20.6%), horseshoe-like fistulas (85.5% vs 14.5%), and supralevator fistulas (93.5% vs 16.1%). Similar incidences were also seen in cases with ischioanal-involved horseshoe-like fistulas (75.0% vs 25.0%). Limitations: This study was limited by its retrospective nature. Conclusions: The deep posterior intersphincteric space is more likely than the deep postanal space to be involved in complex cryptoglandular fistulas and is likely to play a more important role in the management of complex cryptoglandular fistulas.
    Article · Aug 2016 · Diseases of the Colon & Rectum
  • Article · Aug 2016 · Diseases of the Colon & Rectum
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Background: Following the introduction of complete mesocolic excision, a new pathological evaluation of the resected colon cancer specimen was introduced. This concept has quickly gained acceptance and is often used to compare surgical quality. The grading of colon cancer specimens is likely to depend on both surgical quality and the training of the pathologist. Objective: To validate the principles of the pathological evaluation of colon cancer specimens. Design: Exploratory study. Settings: Aarhus, Denmark and Leeds, United Kingdom. Patients: Colon cancers specimens. Main outcome measures: The agreement of gradings between participants was of interest. Four specialist gastrointestinal pathologists and two abdominal surgeons evaluated two rounds of colon cancer specimens, each at two separate time points. Each round contained 50 specimens. Following the first round a protocol of detailed principles for the grading procedure was agreed upon. Results from an experienced pathologist were considered as the reference person. Results: In the first round, the distribution of gradings between participants showed substantial variation. In the second round, the variation reduced. Intra-observer agreement was mostly fair-to-good whereas, inter-observer agreement was frequently poor. This did not significantly change from round one to round two. Limitations: The small sample size of 100 specimens provided a very small number of specimens resected in the muscularis propria plane, which renders the evaluation of this group potentially unreliable. The evaluations were made on photos and not on fresh specimens. Conclusion: This study demonstrates significant variation in the pathological evaluation of colon cancer specimens. It demonstrates that it cannot be used in clinical studies and care should be taken when comparing results between different hospitals.
    Article · Jun 2016 · Diseases of the Colon & Rectum
  • Article · Jun 2016 · Diseases of the Colon & Rectum
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Ethnic inequalities in colorectal cancer care were reported previously in the United States. Studies specifically reporting on ethnic inequalities in rectal cancer care are limited. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to explore potential ethnic inequalities in rectal cancer care in the Netherlands. DESIGN: This was a nationwide, population-based observational study. SETTINGS: The study linked data of the Netherlands Cancer Registry with the Dutch population registry and the Social Statistics Database of Statistics Netherlands. Data were analyzed using stepwise multivariable logistic regression models. PATIENTS: All of the patients diagnosed with rectal carcinoma in 2003-2011 in the Netherlands (N = 27,159) were included. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: We analyzed 2 rectal cancer treatment indicators (preoperative radiotherapy and sphincter-sparing surgery) and 2 indicators of short-term outcome of rectal cancer surgery (anastomotic leakage and 30-day postoperative mortality). RESULTS: Patients of Western non-Dutch and non-Western origin with rectal cancer were significantly younger and had a higher tumor stage than ethnic Dutch patients. Considering preoperative radiotherapy, anastomotic leakage, and 30-day postoperative mortality, no ethnic inequalities were detected. After adjustment for age, sex, disease characteristics, and socioeconomic status, Western non-Dutch and non-Western patients were significantly more likely to receive sphincter-sparing surgery than ethnic Dutch patients (OR = 1.27 (95% CI, 1.04-1.55) and OR = 1.57 (95% CI, 1.02-2.42)). LIMITATIONS: This study was limited by the relatively low numbers of non-Dutch patients with rectal cancer. CONCLUSIONS: Non-Dutch ethnic origin was associated with a higher rate of sphincter-sparing surgery. The absence of ethnic inequalities in preoperative radiotherapy, anastomotic leakage, and 30-day postoperative mortality suggests that ethnic minority patients have similar chances of optimal rectal cancer care outcomes as Dutch patients.
    Article · Jun 2016 · Diseases of the Colon & Rectum