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    ABSTRACT: Programmed necrosis (or necroptosis) is a form of cell death triggered by the activation of receptor interacting protein kinase-3 (RIPK3). Several reports have implicated mitochondria and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation as effectors of RIPK3-dependent cell death. Here, we directly test this idea by employing a method for the specific removal of mitochondria via mitophagy. Mitochondria-deficient cells were resistant to the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis, but efficiently died via tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-induced, RIPK3-dependent programmed necrosis or as a result of direct oligomerization of RIPK3. Although the ROS scavenger butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) delayed TNF-induced necroptosis, it had no effect on necroptosis induced by RIPK3 oligomerization. Furthermore, although TNF-induced ROS production was dependent on mitochondria, the inhibition of TNF-induced necroptosis by BHA was observed in mitochondria-depleted cells. Our data indicate that mitochondrial ROS production accompanies, but does not cause, RIPK3-dependent necroptotic cell death.
    Full-text · Article · Nov 2013 · Cell Reports
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    ABSTRACT: TAL1 is an important regulator of hematopoiesis and its expression is tightly controlled despite complexities in its genomic organization. It is frequently misregulated in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL), often due to deletions between TAL1 and the neighbouring STIL gene. To better understand the events that lead to TAL1 expression in hematopoiesis and in T-ALL, we studied looping interactions at the TAL1 locus. In TAL1 expressing erythroid cells, the locus adopts a looping "hub" which brings into close physical proximity all known TAL1 cis-regulatory elements including CTCF-bound insulators. Loss of GATA1 results in disassembly of the hub and loss of CTCF/RAD21 from one of its insulators. Genes flanking TAL1 are partly dependent on hub integrity for their transcriptional regulation. We identified looping patterns unique to TAL1 expressing T-ALL cells, and, intriguingly, loops occurring between the TAL1 and STIL genes at the common TAL1/STIL breakpoints found in T-ALL. These findings redefine how TAL1 and neighbouring genes communicate within the nucleus, and indicate that looping facilitates both normal and aberrant TAL1 expression and may pre-dispose to structural rearrangements in T-ALL. We also propose that GATA1-dependent looping mechanisms may facilitate the conservation of TAL1 regulation despite cis-regulatory remodelling during vertebrate evolution.
    Full-text · Article · Nov 2013 · Blood
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    ABSTRACT: Sirtuins comprise a family of genes involved in cellular stress, survival and damage responses. They have been implicated in a range of diseases including cancer, with most information pertaining to their function in tumourigenesis being derived from in vitro studies, or model organisms. Their putative roles as tumour suppressors or tumour promoters remain to be validated in vivo. Little is known about their role in breast tumourigenesis. We sought to evaluate the seven sirtuin family members (SIRT1-7) in a human breast cancer cohort, in relation to clinico-pathological features and outcome of the disease. Immunohistochemical analysis of SIRT1-7 protein levels was undertaken in 392 oestrogen receptor (ER+ve) and 153 ER-ve breast tumour samples. SIRT1-7 transcriptional levels were assessed in normal (n=25), non-malignant (n=73) and malignant (n=70) breast tissue using Relative Quantitative Real Time PCR. Statistical analyses determined if SIRT1-7 transcription or protein expression was associated with clinical parameters or outcome. In ER-ve tumours, high protein levels of nuclear SIRT2 were associated with reduced time to recurrence and disease-specific death. This association was only observed in Grade 3 tumours. In the ER+ve cohort, high SIRT2 nuclear levels were associated with shorter disease-free survival and time to recurrence whilst on Tamoxifen, in patients with Grade 3 tumours. Conversely, in Grade 2 tumours, high SIRT2 levels were associated with increased time to recurrence. Our data suggest that SIRT2 is the sirtuin predominantly involved in breast tumourigenesis and prognosis. It indicates that SIRT2 acts as a tumour suppressor or tumour promoter dependent upon breast tumour grade.
    Full-text · Article · Oct 2013 · European journal of cancer (Oxford, England: 1990)
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