25
18.85
0.75
33

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    ABSTRACT: A comparison is made between two vehicle control strategies for two different manoeuvres: a gentle and aggressive lane-change. Simulation results demonstrate that the choice of control objectives and selection of appropriate design approximations have a significant impact on the performance of the controller under these different manoeuvre conditions. A lateral control design trade-off between passenger comfort and collision avoidance capability is evident.
    Full-text · Conference Paper · Jul 2007
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    ABSTRACT: The bond-graph method is a graphical approach to modeling in which component energy ports are connected by bonds that specify the transfer of energy between system components. Power, the rate of energy transport between components, is the universal currency of physical systems. Bond graphs are inherently energy based and thus related to other energy-based methods, including dissipative systems and port-Hamiltonians. This article has presented an introduction to bond graphs for control engineers. Although the notation can initially appear daunting, the bond graph method is firmly grounded in the familiar concepts of energy and power. The essential element to be grasped is that bonds represent power transactions between components
    Full-text · Article · May 2007 · IEEE control systems
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    ABSTRACT: Predictive pole-placement (PPP) control is a continuous-time MPC using a particular set of basis functions leading to pole-placement behaviour in the unconstrained case. This paper presents two modified versions of the PPP controller which are each shown to have desirable stability properties when controlling systems with input, output and state constraints.
    Full-text · Article · Apr 2006 · Automatica
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