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    ABSTRACT: Information concerning the roles of different brain regions in recognition memory processes is reviewed. The review concentrates on findings from spontaneous recognition memory tasks performed by rats, including memory for single objects, locations, object-location associations and temporal order. Particular emphasis is given to the potential roles of different regions in the circuit of interacting structures involving the perirhinal cortex, hippocampus, medial prefrontal cortex and medial dorsal thalamus in recognition memory for the association of objects and places. It is concluded that while all structures in this circuit play roles critical to such memory, these roles can potentially be differentiated and differences in the underlying synaptic and biochemical processes involved in each region are beginning to be uncovered.
    Full-text · Article · Oct 2014 · Behavioural Brain Research
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    ABSTRACT: Platelets store and secrete the chemokine stromal cell-derived factor (SDF)-1α upon platelet activation, but the ability of platelet-derived SDF-1α to signal in an autocrine/paracrine manner mediating functional platelet responses relevant to thrombosis and haemostasis is unknown. We sought to explore the role of platelet-derived SDF-1α and its receptors, CXCR4 and CXCR7 in facilitating platelet activation and determine the mechanism facilitating SDF-1α-mediated regulation of platelet function. Using human washed platelets, CXCR4 inhibition, but not CXCR7 blockade significantly abrogated collagen-mediated platelet aggregation, dense granule secretion and thromboxane (Tx) A2 production. Time-dependent release of SDF-1α from collagen-activated platelets supports a functional role for SDF-1α in this regard. Using an in vitro whole blood perfusion assay, collagen-induced thrombus formation was substantially reduced with CXCR4 inhibition. In washed platelets, recombinant SDF-1α in the range of 20-100ng/mL(-1) could significantly enhance platelet aggregation responses to a threshold concentration of collagen. These enhancements were completely dependent on CXCR4, but not CXCR7, which triggered TxA2 production and dense granule secretion. Rises in cAMP were significantly blunted by SDF-1α, which could also enhance collagen-mediated Ca(2+) mobilisation, both of which were mediated by CXCR4. This potentiating effect of SDF-1α primarily required TxA2 signalling acting upstream of dense granule secretion, whereas blockade of ADP signalling could only partially attenuate SDF-1α-induced platelet activation. Therefore, this study supports a potentially novel autocrine/paracrine role for platelet-derived SDF-1α during thrombosis and haemostasis, through a predominantly TxA2-dependent and ADP-independent pathway.
    Full-text · Article · Oct 2014 · Cellular Signalling
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    ABSTRACT: Calcium (Ca2+) and Calmodulin (CaM)-dependent serine/threonine kinase II (CaMKII) plays a central role in synaptic plasticity and memory due to its ability to phosphorylate itself and regulate its own kinase activity. Autophosphorylation at threonine 287 (T287) switches CaMKII to a Ca2+ independent and constitutively active state replicated by overexpression of a phosphomimetic CaMKII-T287D transgene or blocked by expression of a T287A transgene. A second pair of sites, T306 T307 in the CaM binding region once autophosphorylated, prevents CaM binding and inactivates the kinase during synaptic plasticity and memory, and can be blocked by a TT306/7AA transgene. Recently the synaptic scaffolding molecule called CASK (Ca2+/CaM-associated serine kinase) has been shown to control both sets of CaMKII autophosphorylation events during neuronal growth, Ca2+ signaling and memory in Drosophila. Deletion of either full length CASK or just its CaMK-like and L27 domains removed middle-term memory (MTM) and long-term memory (LTM), with CASK function in the α′/ß′ mushroom body neurons being required for memory. In a similar manner directly changing the levels of CaMKII autophosphorylation (T287D, T287A, or TT306/7AA) in the α′/ß′ neurons also removed MTM and LTM. In the CASK null mutant expression of either the Drosophila or human CASK transgene in the α′/ß′ neurons was found to completely rescue memory, confirming that CASK signaling in α′/β′ neurons is necessary and sufficient for Drosophila memory formation and that the neuronal function of CASK is conserved between Drosophila and human. Expression of human CASK in Drosophila also rescued the effect of CASK deletion on the activity state of CaMKII, suggesting that human CASK may also regulate CaMKII autophosphorylation. Mutations in human CASK have recently been shown to result in intellectual disability and neurological defects suggesting a role in plasticity and learning possibly via regulation of CaMKII autophosphorylation.
    Full-text · Article · Jun 2014 · Frontiers in Neuroscience
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