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    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: To compare self-reported experiences of and attitudes towards sexual professional boundaries (SPB) in a cohort of undergraduate and graduate physiotherapists domiciled in the UK and Australia. DESIGN: A cross sectional survey design was utilised to capture data from two UK cohorts. SETTING: Data was collected from a University in the Midlands region of England. PARTICIPANTS: Fifty one final year undergraduate students and 17 graduate students took part in this study. This was compared to published data from Australian undergraduates (n=67) and Australian graduates (n=939). OUTCOME MEASURES: A questionnaire consisting of 3 distinct sections was distributed. Section 1 established demographic information, section 2 considered personal experience of the SPB, and section 3 considered attitudes to 6 vignettes describing a variety of scenarios examining the SPB. RESULTS: Graduate students in both cohorts demonstrated a greater awareness of professionals crossing the SPB. Self reported sexual attraction towards a patient was significantly higher in graduate students (50%) compared to undergraduates (9%). Six percent and 4% of UK and Australian graduates reporting they had dated a patient. However, a much higher percentage (53% and 17% respectively) reported knowing a colleague who had dated a patient. A significant difference between graduates and undergraduate in their attitudes towards selected vignettes describing SPB crossings was also identified. CONCLUSIONS: The current results provide evidence of inappropriate sexual behaviour occurring within the UK. Both graduates and undergraduates require training pertinent to the topic of SPB. Further research is required to enhance our understanding of this topic area.
    Full-text · Article · Jan 2013 · Physiotherapy
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    Full-text · Article · Dec 2012 · Journal of Advanced Nursing
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    ABSTRACT: In the past decade there has been both an increase in the number of children who receive nursing care in their communities rather than in hospitals, and an increasing willingness to listen to children. This qualitative study used Clark's Mosaic approach to elicit children's views of community children's nursing. Twenty-one children took part in total, with seven children making up a core group who participated in a number of activities for over a year. A non-core group of 14 children were observed receiving care from six community children's nurses. The children had diverse medical conditions, were aged from 11 months to 17 years old and came from diverse social, ethnic and cultural backgrounds. Some children expressed a positive regard for nurses and nursing. Some children a negative regard, others were ambiguous. From these data it is proposed that there is a continuum of regard for nurses. How children regarded nurses did not seem to be related to the nurse's actions, but to the child's understanding of their illness and their involvement in care. Further study is required to clarify the concept and should focus on what effect children's regard for nurses and nursing has on health outcomes.
    Full-text · Article · Mar 2012 · Journal of Child Health Care
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