Queensland Government
  • Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
Recent publications
Background: Bemisia tabaci is a globally significant agricultural pest including in Australia, where it exhibits resistance to numerous insecticides. With a recent label change, buprofezin (group 16), is now used for whitefly management in Australia. This study investigated resistance to pyriproxyfen (group 7C), spirotetramat (group 23) and buprofezin using bioassays and available molecular markers. Results: Bioassay and selection testing of B. tabaci populations detected resistance to pyriproxyfen with resistance ratios ranging from 4.1 to 56. Resistance to spirotetramat was detected using bioassay, selection testing, and sequencing techniques. In populations collected from cotton, the A2083V mutation was detected in three populations out of 85 tested, at frequencies ≤ 4.1%, while in limited surveillance of populations from an intensive horticultural region the frequency was ≥ 75.8%. The baseline susceptibility of B. tabaci to buprofezin was determined from populations tested from 2019 to 2020, in which LC50 values ranged from 0.61 to 10.75 mg/L. From the bioassay data, a discriminating dose of 200 mg/L was developed. Recent surveillance of 16 populations detected no evidence of resistance with 100% mortality recorded at doses ≤ 32mg/L. A cross resistance study found no conclusive evidence of resistance to buprofezin in populations with high resistance to pyriproxyfen or spirotetramat. Conclusions: In Australian cotton, B. tabaci pest management is challenged by ongoing resistance to pyriproxyfen, while resistance to spirotetramat is an emerging issue. The addition of buprofezin provides a new mode of action for whitefly pest management, which will strengthen the existing insecticide resistance management strategy. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
We propose a Bayesian model which produces probabilistic reconstructions of hydroclimatic variability in Queensland Australia. The model provides a standardized approach to hydroclimate reconstruction using multiple palaeoclimate proxy records derived from natural archives such as speleothems, ice cores and tree rings. The method combines time‐series modeling with inverse prediction to quantify the relationships between a given hydroclimate index and relevant proxies over an instrumental period and subsequently reconstruct the hydroclimate back through time. We present case studies for Brisbane and Fitzroy catchments focusing on two hydroclimate indices, the Rainfall Index (RFI) and the Standardized Precipitation‐Evapotranspiration Index (SPEI). The probabilistic nature of the reconstructions allows us to estimate the probability that a hydroclimate index in any reconstruction year was lower (higher) than the minimum (maximum) value observed over the instrumental period. In Brisbane, the RFI is unlikely (probabilities < 5%) to have exhibited extremes beyond the minimum/maximum values observed between 1889 and 2019. However, in Fitzroy there are several years during the reconstruction period where the RFI is likely (>50% probability) to have exhibited behavior beyond the minimum/maximum of what has been observed, during the instrumental period. For SPEI, the probability of observing such extremes prior to the beginning of the instrumental period in 1889 doesn't exceed 30% in any reconstruction year in Brisbane, but exceeds 50% in multiple years in Fitzroy.
The state and dynamics of river chemistry are influenced by both anthropogenic and natural catchment characteristics. However, understanding key controls on catchment mean concentrations and export patterns comprehensively across a wide range of climate zones is still lacking, as most of this research is focused on temperate regions. In this study, we investigate the catchment controls on mean concentrations and export patterns (concentration–discharge relationship, C–Q slope) of river chemistry, using a long-term data set of up to 507 sites spanning five climate zones (i.e., arid, Mediterranean, temperate, subtropical, tropical) across the Australian continent. We use Bayesian model averaging (BMA) and hierarchical modelling (BHM) approaches to predict the mean concentrations and export patterns and compare the relative importance of 26 catchment characteristics (e.g., topography, climate, land use, land cover, soil properties and hydrology). Our results demonstrate that mean concentrations result from the interaction of catchment indicators and anthropogenic factors (i.e., land use, topography and soil), while export patterns are influenced by topography. We also found that incorporating the effects of climate zones in a BHM framework improved the predictability of both mean concentrations and C–Q slopes, suggesting the importance of climatic controls on hydrological and biogeochemical processes. Our study provides insights into the contrasting effects of catchment controls across different climate zones. Investigating those controls can inform sustainable water quality management strategies that consider the potential changes in river chemistry state and export behaviour.
Loss of adipose tissue in vertebrate wildlife species is indicative of decreased nutritional and health status and is linked to environmental stress and diseases. Body condition indices (BCI) are commonly used in ecological studies to estimate adipose tissue mass across wildlife populations. However, these indices have poor predictive power, which poses the need for quantitative methods for improved population assessments. Here, we calibrate bioelectrical impedance spectroscopy (BIS) as an alternative approach for assessing the nutritional status of vertebrate wildlife in ecological studies. BIS is a portable technology that can estimate body composition from measurements of body impedance and is widely used in humans. BIS is a predictive technique that requires calibration using a reference body composition method. Using sea turtles as model organisms, we propose a calibration protocol using computed tomography (CT) scans, with the prediction equation being: adipose tissue mass (kg) = body mass − (−0.03 [intercept] − 0.29 * length2/resistance at 50 kHz + 1.07 * body mass − 0.11 * time after capture). CT imaging allows for the quantification of body fat. However, processing the images manually is prohibitive due to the extensive time requirement. Using a form of artificial intelligence (AI), we trained a computer model to identify and quantify nonadipose tissue from the CT images, and adipose tissue was determined by the difference in body mass. This process enabled estimating adipose tissue mass from bioelectrical impedance measurements. The predictive performance of the model was built on 2/3 samples and tested against 1/3 samples. Prediction of adipose tissue percentage had greater accuracy when including impedance parameters (mean bias = 0.11%–0.61%) as predictor variables, compared with using body mass alone (mean bias = 6.35%). Our standardized BIS protocol improves on conventional body composition assessment methods (e.g., BCI) by quantifying adipose tissue mass. The protocol can be applied to other species for the validation of BIS and to provide robust information on the nutritional and health status of wildlife, which, in turn, can be used to inform conservation decisions at the management level. Loss of body fat (i.e., adipose tissue) in vertebrate wildlife species is indicative of decreased nutritional and health status and is linked to environmental stress and diseases. Here, we calibrate bioelectrical impedance spectroscopy (BIS) for assessing the nutritional status of sea turtles. Using a form of artificial intelligence, we trained a computer model to identify and quantify body fat from computed tomography scans, which enabled estimating body fat from the BIS measurements. Our standardized BIS protocol can be applied to other species and taxa and improves on conventional body composition assessment methods (e.g., body condition indices) by accurately estimating body fat.
Virtual delivery of obesity prevention and treatment programs may be effective for supporting children and families to adopt healthy lifestyle changes while enhancing program accessibility. This rapid review aimed to summarize the impact of family-based digital interventions for childhood obesity prevention and treatment. Four databases were searched up to February 2021 for trials of interactive digital programs aimed to prevent and/or treat obesity in children aged 5–12 years and reported diet, physical activity, sedentary behavior, sleep, or weight-related outcomes in children. A total of 23 publications (from 18 interventions) were included. Behavior change theories were used in 13 interventions with “Social Cognitive Theory” applied most frequently (n = 9). Interventions included websites (n = 11), text messaging (n = 5), video gaming (n = 2), Facebook (n = 3), and/or mobile applications (n = 2). Studies reported changes in body mass index (BMI; n = 11 studies), diet (n = 11), physical activity (n = 10), screen time (n = 6), and/or sleep (n = 1). Significant improvements were reported for diet (n = 5) or physical activity (n = 4). Two of the six interventions were effective in reducing screen time. Digital interventions have shown modest improvements in child BMI and significant effectiveness in diet and physical activity, with emerging evidence supporting the use of social media and video gaming to enhance program delivery.
Deforestation exacerbates climate change through greenhouse gas emissions, but other climatic alterations linked to the local biophysical changes remain poorly understood. Here, we assess the impact of tropical deforestation on fire weather risk – that is the climate conditions conducive to wildfires – using high-resolution convection-permitting climate simulations. We consider two land cover scenarios for the island of Borneo: land cover in 1980 (forest scenario) and land cover in 2050 (deforestation scenario) to force a convection-permitting climate model, using ERA-Interim reanalysis for the 2002-2016 period. Our findings revealed significant alterations in post-deforestation fire precursors such as increased temperature, wind speed and potential evapotranspiration and decreased humidity, cloud cover and precipitation. As a result, fire weather events that would occur once a year, are likely to occur four times a year following deforestation. Likewise, extreme conditions, such as those occurring on longer time-horizons greater than 20 years, the magnitude of extreme fire weather is likely to double following deforestation. These increases in extreme fire weather conditions demonstrate the key role of tropical forests in regulating regional climate processes, including reduced fire weather risk.
Enhanced-efficiency nitrogen fertilizers provide an opportunity for sustainable intensification of agricultural industries. However, field experiments evaluating yield and nitrogen loss benefits from enhanced-efficiency fertilizers often fail to obtain statistically significant treatment differences. Agricultural systems modeling provides a means to perform thousands of virtual response trials, allowing us to unravel the complex interactions between crop, management, and seasonal climate that determine the efficacy of these fertilizers. Here, we present simulations of controlled-release fertilizer use in Australian sugarcane (Saccharum sp. L.) production in a wet tropical climate. To quantify the agronomic and environmental benefits, we analyze the yield and nitrogen loss responses to nitrogen rate (response curves), comparing those for urea and controlled-release fertilizers. We also evaluate the impacts of soil type, crop start times, and controlled-release patterns as they interact with seasonal climate and rainfall distribution. The simulation results showed that nitrogen loss and yield benefits were highly variable, and their likelihood determined by three prerequisite conditions: (1) sufficient longevity of protection of the fertilizer nitrogen, (2) occurrence of a nitrogen loss event during this period of protection and before the nitrogen is taken up by the crop, and (3) the crop being responsive to the fertilizer nitrogen. These prerequisite conditions extend to other cropping systems as well as to other enhanced-efficiency nitrogen fertilizers such as nitrification inhibitors. Here, for the first time, we provide a framework for understanding the inconsistent results in field experiments testing the efficacy of enhanced-efficiency nitrogen fertilizers. This understanding will help improve the setting, design, and interpretation of experiments for better demonstration of benefits as well as identify where enhanced-efficiency fertilizers can best increase sustainability of nitrogen management.
Over the first two decades of the 21st century, many wetlands in eastern Australia exhibited declining water levels, causing concern for communities and environmental managers and raising questions about the roles of climate change and other human activity in these water level declines. In this context we examine the causes of water level variability in four wetlands on North Stradbroke Island (Minjerribah), in the humid subtropics of south-eastern Queensland, Australia, using a combination of hydrological and water isotope monitoring and modelling. North Stradbroke Island has a high concentration of wetlands perched above the regional water table, with cultural and ecological significance, and value for palaeoclimate research. From 2015 to 2019, wetland water depths decreased markedly at all sites, coinciding with increases in oxygen isotope ratios in surface waters. The data indicate that climate, specifically a decrease in precipitation relative to evaporation, was responsible for those declining water levels, and that groundwater extraction did not play a critical role. At two of the sites—both palustrine wetlands—declining surface water levels led to intermittent connectivity with the local perched aquifers. At the other two sites, which are both shallow lakes, the surface waters were constantly fed by perched groundwater. The hydrology of the two lakes was modelled using simple mass balance. However, in order to accurately model lake level change, it was necessary to vary catchment runoff and lake outflow via groundwater through time, highlighting complexity in projecting future hydrological change in these lakes. The long term resilience of these lakes depends on a combination of rainfall regime and the balance between catchment runoff and groundwater throughflow, the future of which is highly uncertain. As a consequence, continued efforts to project future hydroclimate and to model the complex hydrology of subtropical wetlands are essential.
Introduction: In Australia, sonographer's professional identity is traditionally 'caught' from clinical role models. A four-year undergraduate-postgraduate course introduced professional identity education, with simulated practice, to prepare novice sonographer students prior to clinical practice. Preclinical students learnt sonographer professional behaviour, and humanistic attributes, during simulation designed with volunteer peers as standardised patients, educator role-models, immediate feedback, self-reflection, and longitudinal multi-observer assessment. This paper reports on the transfer of learnt professional behaviour and humanistic attributes to clinical practice. Methods: Professional behaviour evaluations completed by 94 clinical assessors described 174 students' professional behaviour and attributes one month into their initial clinical practice (2015-6). Student performance of each behaviour, and behavioural category, was quantitatively analysed by modelling binomial proportions with logistic regression. Results: Students demonstrated substantial learning transfer to clinical practice, achieving an overall mean score of 'consistent' sonographer professional behaviour and humanistic attributes (mean score of equal to or >3/4), one month into clinical practice. Professional behaviours varied in transferability, with 'response to patient's questions' showing least efficacy (P < 0.05). Increased deliberate practice with educator role-models improved transfer efficacy significantly (P < 0.001). Conclusion: Preclinical application of theory to simulated practice, using standardised patients, educator role-models, immediate feedback, and multi-observer assessment, facilitated substantial transfer of sonographer professional behaviour and attributes to clinical practice. The efficacy of transfer varied but improved with increased deliberate practice and feedback. Implications for practice: The incorporation of preclinical professional behaviour education with simulated practice into the core curriculum of sonographer courses is recommended for the formation of sonographer professional identity, improved clinical outcomes and increased patient safety during the early stages of ultrasound education.
Black marlin Istiompax indica and striped marlin Kajikia audax are large, fast-swimming, oceanic apex predators. Both species are increasingly exploited by fisheries with varied gear encounter rates at different depths, causing concern for their status. Here, we examined vertical habitat use by 34 black and 39 striped marlin caught off Kenya, using pop-up satellite tags to compare their diving behaviours. Tags recorded depth and temperature time-series for a mean (±SD) of 43 ± 53 days per track. Marlin dived extensively moving up to ~14 vertical km in cumulative dives per day in addition to a daily mean of ~50 km in horizontal movements. Both species had similar maximum depths (460-470 m). Striped marlin dived deeper more frequently than black marlin, and also spent more of their time at the water surface (top 5 m: 50.7 vs. 32.3% in black marlin). Most striped marlin had a normal diel vertical migration dive pattern over their track (61.5% of individuals), while ~35% of black marlin showed a crepuscular pattern, diving particularly deep at dusk and dawn. Striped marlin spent almost twice as much time (7.4%) inside the oxygen minimum zone (<150 μmol kg ⁻¹ dissolved oxygen) than black marlin (4%). The extensive use of surface waters by striped marlin may be a behavioural response to re-oxygenate and/or warm up after dives into cold or oxygen-poor waters. Two free-jumping events immediately before tag detachment demonstrated why it is challenging to keep tags attached to these highly active fishes. Their vertical habitat use shows that both species are highly susceptible to capture in regional drift gillnet and longline fisheries.
Background: There are limited evidence-based programs for children living in Queensland, Australia, who are at risk of overweight or obesity. Despite the known importance of prevention initiatives, an online, locally relevant program supporting sustainable health behaviors does not exist. This study aimed to understand the perspectives of parents/guardians and health professionals regarding important aspects of an online childhood obesity prevention program. Methods: This pragmatic, mixed-methods study was conducted from March to December 2020. Recruitment included participants from two groups involved with children aged 2-17 years, health professionals, and parents/guardians. Phase 1 involved dissemination of an online survey. Questions addressed program structure, content delivery (including nutrition, physical activity, and parenting practices), program evaluation, and information dissemination. Descriptive statistics were used to describe survey data to inform the delivery of Phase 2, where two focus groups further explored the topics. Thematic analysis was used to investigate the qualitative data. Results: Twenty-eight health professionals and 11 parents/guardians completed the survey, and 14 health professionals and 6 parents/guardians participated in the focus groups. Participants believed that the most beneficial approach would target younger children with family-based interventions, via a nontraditional structure. There was a strong preference for interactive content, gamification, and practical resources to translate knowledge into practice. Parents emphasized that there should be no assumption of basic knowledge, and that decision fatigue is a barrier to engagement. Conclusion: Participants provided clear direction regarding key aspects for future development of an online prevention program, highlighting the importance of codesign to tailor the program to identified needs.
Background: Species within the Bemisia tabaci cryptic species complex can cause significant crop damage. We used high-throughput amplicon sequencing to identify the species composition and resistance allele genotypes in field populations from cotton fields in Australia. For selected populations, the resistance phenotype was determined in bioassays and compared to sequencing data. Results: A metabarcoding approach was used to analyse the species composition in 144 field populations collected between 2013-2021. Two mixed AUS I and MEAM1 populations were detected while the remaining 142 populations consisted of MEAM1 only. High-throughput sequencing of organophosphate and pyrethroid resistance gene amplicons showed that the organophosphate resistance allele F331W was fixed (>99%) in all MEAM1 populations, while the pyrethroid resistance allele L925I in the voltage-gated sodium channel gene was detected at varying frequencies [1.0-7.0% (43 populations); 27.7% and 42.1% (2 populations); 95-97.5% (3 populations)]. Neither organophosphate nor pyrethroid resistance alleles were detected in the AUS I populations. Pyrethroid bioassays of 85 MEAM1 field-derived populations detected no resistance in 51 populations, while 32 populations showed low frequency resistance, and 2 populations were highly resistant. Conclusions: We demonstrate that high-throughput sequencing and bioassays are complementary approaches. The detection of target site mutations and the phenotypic provides a comprehensive analysis of the low-level resistance to pyrethroids that is present in Australian cotton farms. In contrast, a limited survey of whitefly populations from horticulture found evidence of high-level resistance against pyrethroids. Furthermore, we found that the F331W allele (linked to organophosphate resistance) is ubiquitous in Australian MEAM1. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
In semi-arid landscapes, water regimes play a critical role in shaping patterns of vegetation regeneration. In riparian and floodplain habitats, however, the importance of flooding versus rainfall is poorly established for many species and habitats. Here, we present the results of a field experiment designed to investigate the establishment responses of both Eucalyptus camaldulensis (river red gum) seedings and understory vegetation to different hydrological conditions within two contrasting habitat types. We ran a field experiment in these habitats along the Condamine River in the northern Murray-Darling Basin in eastern inland Australia. We imposed flooding, rainfall, and drought treatments on 180 seedlings of E. camaldulensis and extant understory vegetation in 18 experimental plots to examine seedling survival and the establishment and dynamics of understory plant assemblages over nine months. Although there was very high seedling mortality overall, our results were consistent with findings from elsewhere in the Murray-Darling Basin indicating that flooding is a critical factor driving the survival of E. camaldulensis seedlings and the resilience of understory vegetation cover and diversity. Although the chance of seedling survival up until ten weeks was higher in the riparian habitat than in the floodplain old-field, the effect of habitat type was reduced under flooded conditions. Despite the low numbers of surviving E. camaldulensis seedlings, the value of a few successfully established trees on old-fields should not be underestimated, nor the potential effects of flooding on restoring the understory. This research highlights that rainfall is unlikely to provide sufficient watering in these habitats for vegetation regeneration.
Background Bananas (Musa spp.) are a globally significant crop and are severely afflicted by diseases for which there are no effective chemical controls. Banana microbiomes may provide novel solutions to these constraints but are difficult to manage due to their high diversity and variability between locations. Hence ‘common core’ taxa, which are a subset of the microbiome that frequent all, or most, individuals of a host species, represent logical targets for the development of microbiome management approaches. Results To identify the common core bacterial microbiome of banana, we first performed a pot experiment to characterise the effects of two factors that are likely to differ between farms (viz. edaphic conditions and host genotype) on bacterial diversity in bulk soil and seven plant compartments. As diversity was found to differ between plant compartments and soils, but not genotypes, we identified populations that were frequent across most plants irrespective of the soil in which they were grown. Shortlisted ‘candidates’ were then refined according to whether they were also frequent in a survey of 52 field-grown Musa spp. This led to the selection of 36 ‘common core’ bacteria, that represented 65–95% of the dominant taxa in field-grown plants and were identified as highly interconnected ‘hubs’ using networks – a characteristic shown to be indicative of microbes that influence host fitness in studies of other plants. Lastly, by comparing the sequences of our core taxa with those reported in 22 previous studies, we demonstrated that they are closely related to banana-associated bacteria observed on five other continents. Conclusions Our study provides a robust list of common core bacterial taxa for Musa spp. Further research may now focus on how changes in the frequencies and activities of these most persistent taxa influence host fitness. Notably, for several of our core taxa highly similar populations have already been isolated in previous studies and may be amenable to such experimentation. This contribution should help to accelerate the development of effective Musa spp. microbiome management practices.
Background Bananas ( Musa spp.) are a globally significant crop and are severely afflicted by diseases for which there are no effective chemical controls. Banana microbiomes may provide novel solutions to these constraints but are difficult to manage due to their high diversity and variability between locations. Hence ‘common core’ taxa, which are a subset of the microbiome that frequent all, or most, individuals of a host species, represent logical targets for the development of microbiome management approaches. ResultsTo identify the common core bacterial microbiome of banana, we first performed a pot experiment to characterise the effects of two factors that are likely to differ between farms ( viz . edaphic conditions and host genotype) on bacterial diversity in bulk soil and seven plant compartments. As diversity was found to differ between plant compartments and soils, but not genotypes, we identified populations that were frequent across most plants irrespective of the soil in which they were grown. Shortlisted ‘candidates’ were then refined according to whether they were also frequent in a survey of 52 field-grown Musa spp. This led to the selection of 36 ‘common core’ bacteria, that represented 65-95% of the dominant taxa in field-grown plants and were identified as highly interconnected ‘hubs’ using networks – a characteristic shown to be indicative of microbes that influence host fitness in studies of other plants. Lastly, by comparing the sequences of our core taxa with those reported in 22 previous studies, we demonstrated that they are closely related to banana-associated bacteria observed on five other continents. Conclusions Our study provides a robust list of common core bacterial taxa for Musa spp. Further research may now focus on how changes in the frequencies and activities of these most persistent taxa influence host fitness. Notably, for several of our core taxa highly similar populations have already been isolated in previous studies and may be amenable to such experimentation. This contribution should help to accelerate the development of effective Musa spp. microbiome management practices.
Marine-protected areas are designated to reduce anthropogenic impacts on biodiversity and enhance fish production, but other ecological processes are inadequately accommodated in plans for coastal and marine ecosystems. We conducted a quantitative systematic literature review and meta-analysis on how researchers and decision-makers include ecological processes in coastal and marine conservation planning. Marine spatial planning ideally delivers representative protected areas systems that deliver persistence for ecosystems and species. Although several reviews have reported on incorporating connectivity as a process in marine spatial planning, to our knowledge, no one has yet published an inclusive review on how ecological processes are incorporated to help ensure persistence in coastal and marine planning. A total of 162 peer-reviewed journal research papers and 27 non-peer-reviewed papers (n = 189) were identified that included ecological processes in coastal and marine conservation planning between 2000 and 2019, the number of papers integrating ecological processes peaked in 2013 followed by a declining trend to 2019. We attribute the trend to the complexity of the problem of integrating dispersal and demographic objectives alongside other management goals. The results of our statistical analysis uncovered that incorporating ecological processes in conservation planning is important for coastal and marine ecosystems across the literature (p-value < 0.001). However, there was significant variation in scope and choice of method in planning assessments. Dispersal was the process most frequently incorporated in spatial plans, followed by demography and flows of nonliving materials. Identifying appropriate ecosystem objectives and incorporating multiple sources of uncertainty into conservation planning for coastal and marine ecosystems remain important areas for future research. This review highlights the need for greater awareness among planners of the relevance of ecological processes in conservation planning for coastal and marine ecosystems.
Rolling shear (RS) is one of the key design parameters that influence the out-of-plane bending stiffness of cross-laminated timber (CLT) panels and thus affects the design and performance of CLT floor and wall systems. Various experimental methods are currently used to determine the RS capacity of CLT panels and feedstock. Some methods have been adapted to measure RS properties of clear wood such as Iosipescu, Arcan, and single cube apparatus, but there is no specific standard test method to accurately determine the RS stiffness or strength of CLT feedstock. This article presents a comprehensive review of potential RS test methods and highlights the importance of considering RS in CLT design. Test methods were thoroughly reviewed, and critically evaluated for their relative advantages and shortcomings. It was shown that sample preparation, testing procedure, and post-processing of results can significantly affect experimental outcomes, especially the RS modulus. It is recommended that in addition to current recommendations in CEN - EN 408, Timber Structures – Structural Timber and Glued Laminated Timber – Determination of Some Physical and Mechanical Properties, further specifications should be outlined in regards to plate material and type, glue type, and, more importantly, the relative location of reference points used for deformation measurement to ensure consistent and reliable comparison of RS characteristics reported by researchers. An equation was derived, and is presented, that ensures the vertical load passes through the centroid of the inclined specimen to avoid eccentricity in the specimen and moment transfer at the base of the plates. The effect of various factors on RS properties have been reviewed.
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1,240 members
Carole Louise Wright
  • Department of Agriculture and Fisheries (DAF)
Reinier M Mann
  • Department of Environment and Science
Elizabeth V Fowler
  • Department of Agriculture and Fisheries
Ian Coombes
  • Pharmacy
Carmel T Taylor
  • Department of Health
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Commissioner Katarina Carroll
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www.qfes.qld.gov.au