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  • No preview · Article · Jan 2013 · The Lancet
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    ABSTRACT: To sketch out how contemporary Anglophone literature on self-damaging behaviour negotiates serious conceptual difficulties around intention, and to demonstrate (in the British context) how the large-scale emergence of this type of behaviour is made possible by new forms of psychological provision at district general hospitals. In the past decade, there has been increasing public awareness of 'self-harm'. Despite the view that 'self-harm' has always existed, the British roots of the current 'epidemic' can be traced to changes in the organization of mental healthcare in the postwar period. These changes make possible new understandings of the story behind physical injuries, and allow these readings to be aggregated and projected onto a national, epidemic scale. The increasing provision of psychiatric expertise in general hospitals makes possible new interpretations of self-injury - as psychosocial communication, or affect self-regulation - and creates the phenomenon of 'self-harm' as we understand it today.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2012 · Current opinion in psychiatry
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    ABSTRACT: The word "emotion" has named a psychological category and a subject for systematic enquiry only since the 19th century. Before then, relevant mental states were categorised variously as "appetites," "passions," "affections," or "sentiments." The word "emotion" has existed in English since the 17th century, originating as a translation of the French émotion, meaning a physical disturbance. It came into much wider use in 18th-century English, often to refer to mental experiences, becoming a fully fledged theoretical term in the following century, especially through the influence of two Scottish philosopher-physicians, Thomas Brown and Charles Bell. This article relates this intellectual and semantic history to contemporary debates about the usefulness and meaning of "emotion" as a scientific term.
    Full-text · Article · Oct 2012 · Emotion Review
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