Palmengarten und Botanischer Garten Frankfurt am Main
Recent publications
Phenology has emerged as key indicator of the biological impacts of climate change. Yet the role of functional traits constraining variation in herbaceous species’ phenology has received little attention. Botanical gardens are ideal places to investigate large numbers of species growing in common climate. We ask whether interspecific variation in plant phenology is influenced by differences in functional traits. We recorded onset, end, duration and intensity of initial growth, leafing out, leaf senescence, flowering and fruiting for 212 species across five botanical gardens in Germany. We measured functional traits, including plant height, absolute and specific leaf area, leaf dry matter content, leaf carbon and nitrogen content and seed mass and accounted for species’ relatedness. Closely related species showed greater similarities in timing of phenological events than expected by chance, but species’ traits had high explanatory power, hinting to paramount importance of species’ life‐history strategies. Taller plants had later timing of initial growth, flowered, fruited and underwent leaf senescence later. Large‐leaved species had shorter flowering and fruiting durations. Taller, large‐leaved species differ in their phenology and are more competitive than smaller, small‐leaved species. We assume climate warming will change plant communities’ competitive hierarchies with consequences for biodiversity.
MHT: How and how long in healthy women above 65? Abstract. In Europe, women spend more than one third of their lifetime in the postmenopause which is characterized by chronic estrogen deficiency. About 80 % of them suffer from vasomotor symptoms which can last for up to twelve years or more. Menopausal hormone therapy (MHT) with sexual steroids is the most effective treatment resulting in a reduction of hot flushes and an improvement of quality of life. Today, a large proportion of women is not treated adequately as demonstrated by a marked decline of MHT-prescriptions. The postmenopause is not only associated with climacteric symptoms, but also with long-term risks, such as cardiovascular events, osteoporosis, cognitive dysfunction or diabetes mellitus. Numerous studies have shown beneficial effects of MHT on many of these diseases and on mortality, provided that treatment has been initiated close to the onset of menopause. Accordingly, some investigators have postulated a possible role of MHT in primary prevention. However, concerning long-term beneficial effects of MHT in women beyond the age of 65 years, the optimal duration of MHT is still unknown. Consequently, the duration of MHT should always be planned individually after thorough consideration of potential benefits and risks in agreement with the patient. Especially with advancing age transdermal application of estrogens seems to be the best option because of less vascular risks. There is no apodictic limitation of maximal duration of MHT.
Assessing biodiversity status and trends in plant communities is critical for understanding, quantifying and predicting the effects of global change on ecosystems. Vegetation plots record the occurrence or abundance of all plant species co‐occurring within delimited local areas. This allows species absences to be inferred, information seldom provided by existing global plant datasets. Although many vegetation plots have been recorded, most are not available to the global research community. A recent initiative, called ‘sPlot’, compiled the first global vegetation plot database, and continues to grow and curate it. The sPlot database, however, is extremely unbalanced spatially and environmentally, and is not open‐access. Here, we address both these issues by (a) resampling the vegetation plots using several environmental variables as sampling strata and (b) securing permission from data holders of 105 local‐to‐regional datasets to openly release data. We thus present sPlotOpen, the largest open‐access dataset of vegetation plots ever released. sPlotOpen can be used to explore global diversity at the plant community level, as ground truth data in remote sensing applications, or as a baseline for biodiversity monitoring. Vegetation plots (n = 95,104) recording cover or abundance of naturally co‐occurring vascular plant species within delimited areas. sPlotOpen contains three partially overlapping resampled datasets (c. 50,000 plots each), to be used as replicates in global analyses. Besides geographical location, date, plot size, biome, elevation, slope, aspect, vegetation type, naturalness, coverage of various vegetation layers, and source dataset, plot‐level data also include community‐weighted means and variances of 18 plant functional traits from the TRY Plant Trait Database. Global, 0.01–40,000 m². 1888–2015, recording dates. 42,677 vascular plant taxa, plot‐level records. Three main matrices (.csv), relationally linked.
Ecological theory is built on trade-offs, where trait differences among species evolved as adaptations to different environments. Trade-offs are often assumed to be bidirectional, where opposite ends of a gradient in trait values confer advantages in different environments. However, unidirectional benefits could be widespread if extreme trait values confer advantages at one end of an environmental gradient, whereas a wide range of trait values are equally beneficial at the other end. Here, we show that root traits explain species occurrences along broad gradients of temperature and water availability, but model predictions only resembled trade-offs in two out of 24 models. Forest species with low specific root length and high root tissue density (RTD) were more likely to occur in warm climates but species with high specific root length and low RTD were more likely to occur in cold climates. Unidirectional benefits were more prevalent than trade-offs: for example, species with large-diameter roots and high RTD were more commonly associated with dry climates, but species with the opposite trait values were not associated with wet climates. Directional selection for traits consistently occurred in cold or dry climates, whereas a diversity of root trait values were equally viable in warm or wet climates. Explicit integration of unidirectional benefits into ecological theory is needed to advance our understanding of the consequences of trait variation on species responses to environmental change. Scrutinizing the empirical evidence for bidirectional trade-offs in fine root traits, the authors show that while these are important in explaining species occurrences along broad temperature and water availability gradients, unidirectional benefits are prevalent.
Hormonal contraceptives are an effective and safe method for preventing pregnancy. Progestins used in contraception are either components of combined hormonal contraceptives (tablets, patches or vaginal rings) or are used as a single active ingredient in progestin mono-preparations (the progestin-only pill (POP), implants, intrauterine systems or depot preparations). Progestins are highly effective in long-term contraception when used properly, and have a very good safety profile with very few contraindications. A new oestrogen-free ovulation inhibitor (POP) has recently been authorised in the USA and the EU. This progestin mono-preparation contains 4 mg of drospirenone (DRSP), which has anti-gonadotropic, anti-mineralocorticoidic and anti-androgenic properties. The hormone administration regimen of 24 days followed by a 4-day hormone-free period was chosen to improve bleeding control and to maintain oestradiol concentrations at early follicular-phase levels, preventing oestrogen deficiency. Clinical trials have demonstrated a high contraceptive effectiveness, a very low risk of cardiovascular side effects and a favourable menstrual bleeding pattern. Due to the long half-life of DRSP (30 – 34 hours), the effectiveness of the preparation is maintained even if a woman forgets to take a pill on a single occasion. Studies involving deliberate 24-hour delays in taking a pill have demonstrated that ovulation inhibition is maintained if a single pill is missed. Following a summary of the current status of oestrogen-free contraception, this review article will describe the clinical development programme of the 4 mg DRSP mono-preparation and the resulting data on the effectiveness and safety of this new oestrogen-free oral hormonal contraceptive.
Even though plants represent an essential part of our lives offering exploitational, supporting and cultural services, we know very little about the biology of the rarest and most threatened plant species, and even less about their conservation status. Rapid changes in the environment and climate, today more pronounced than ever, affect their fitness and distribution causing rapid species declines, sometimes even before they had been discovered. Despite the high goals set by conservationists to protect native plants from further degradation and extinction, the initiatives for the conservation of threatened species in Europe are scattered and have not yielded the desired results. The main aim of this Action is to improve plant conservation in Europe through the establishment of a network of scientists and other stakeholders who deal with different aspects of plant conservation, from plant taxonomy, ecology, conservation genetics, conservation physiology and reproductive biology to protected area's managers, not forgetting social scientists, who are crucial when dealing with the general public.
As herbarium specimens are increasingly becoming digitised and accessible in online repositories, advanced computer vision techniques are being used to extract information from them. The presence of certain plant organs on herbarium sheets is useful information in various scientific contexts and automatic recognition of these organs will help mobilise such information. In our study, we use deep learning to detect plant organs on digitised herbarium specimens with Faster R-CNN. For our experiment, we manually annotated hundreds of herbarium scans with thousands of bounding boxes for six types of plant organs and used them for training and evaluating the plant organ detection model. The model worked particularly well on leaves and stems, while flowers were also present in large numbers in the sheets, but were not equally well recognised.
A contribution to the lichen flora of Turkey is presented. A total of 282 lichen taxa and 20 lichenicolous fungi, of which 4 are varieties, are determined from 87 different localities in Muş province (Turkey). Lichenostigmagracile, a lichenicolous fungus, is new to Turkey, and 274 lichen species and 20 lichenicolous fungi are new for Muş.
Traditional taxonomic studies provide only a limited understanding of species richness within a group. Their usefulness for assessing species diversity could also be limited as many lack sufficient sampling and/or fail to integrate different data types for assessing species boundaries. To explore the challenges and limitations of estimating species richness in lichens, we employed an integrative taxonomic approach to elucidate diversification patterns of the genus Sticta (Peltigeraceae) in Puerto Rico. Specimens were collected throughout the island, and a six-locus dataset was generated to infer phylogenetic relationships among Puerto Rican Sticta and their continental counterparts. Phylogenetic analysis was combined with species delimitation methods and analysis of morpho-anatomical characters to assess diversity patterns and clarify species-level taxonomy. We found that Sticta is represented by 16 species in Puerto Rico and that at least 11 (69%) of them are potentially endemic to the island. We describe eight of these in this work: S. borinquensis sp. nov., S. corymbosa sp. nov., S. densiphyllidiata sp. nov., S. guilartensis sp. nov., S. harrisii sp. nov., S. parvilobata sp. nov., S. riparia sp. nov., and S. tainorum sp. nov. These species do not cluster in a monophyletic assemblage but are scattered over the broader Sticta phylogeny, indicating at least eight separate dispersal events. Putative endemic species were found to have close allies occurring in South America. Careful re-examination of material revealed phenotypical characters that separate most species, suggesting low levels of cryptic diversity. We highlight that integrating molecular methods and other sources of information in species discovery along with comprehensive sampling efforts can greatly enhance our knowledge about diversity patterns in poorly studied groups and regions. Furthermore, species and ecosystems in the Caribbean are being threatened by substantial human-driven changes (e.g., deforestation, climate change). Consequences of these impacts include reduction in already restricted habitats and potential extinction. We argue that studies analyzing species diversity within a phylogenetic framework could better inform conservation efforts aimed at addressing these challenges.
en Bowé (hardened ferricrete soils formed by erosion, drought or deforestation) are often associated with termite mounds, but little is known about these mounds and their role in the restoration of soils and plant biodiversity on bowé. This study examined termite mounds on bowé and their effects on soil depth and plant richness. Sixty‐four sampling plots were laid out randomly on bowé sites with mounds and on adjacent bowé sites without mounds. The height and circumference of each mound were measured. Species inventories were made and soil depth measured in each plot. Linear mixed effects and generalised mixed effects models with Poisson error distribution were used to assess the variation in soil depth and plant species richness in mound and nonmound microsites. Two types of mounds (small vs. large) associated with different termite species were observed on bowé, with the small mounds being most common. Plots with either large or small mounds had deeper soils and higher plant richness than the adjacent plots without mounds. Conservation of termite mounds is important for restoring soils and plant richness on bowé, and termite mounds should be taken into consideration in biodiversity and soil management strategies for bowé. Résumé fr Les bowé (sols ferricrètes durcis formés par l'érosion, la sécheresse ou la déforestation) sont souvent associés aux termitières, mais on sait peu de choses sur ces monticules et leur rôle dans la restauration des sols et de la biodiversité végétale sur les bowé. Cette étude a examiné les termitières sur les bowé et leurs effets sur la profondeur du sol et la richesse végétale. Soixante‐quatre parcelles d'échantillonnage ont été disposées au hasard sur les sites de bowé avec termitières et sur les sites de bowé adjacents sans termitières. La hauteur et la circonférence de chaque termitière ont été mesurées. Des inventaires des espèces ont été réalisés et la profondeur du sol mesurée sur chaque parcelle. Des modèles linéaires et généralisés à effets mixtes ainsi qu'une distribution des erreurs suivant une loi de poisson ont été utilisés pour évaluer la variation de la profondeur du sol et de la richesse en espèces végétales sur les microsites avec termitières et sans termitières. Deux types de termitières (petites par rapport à grandes) associées à différentes espèces de termites ont été observés sur les bowé, les petites termitières étant les plus courantes. Les sols des parcelles contenant à la fois de grandes et de petites termitières étaient plus profonds et la richesse végétale y était plus importante que sur les parcelles adjacentes sans termitières. La conservation des termitières est importante pour restaurer les sols et la richesse végétale des bowé et les termitières doivent être prises en compte dans les stratégies de gestion de la biodiversité et des sols pour les bowé.
This contribution provides a survey on the high-mountain vegetation of Anatolia, Turkey, covering the West Anatolian Mts., the Taurus mountain system, the Inner Anatolian volcanoes, the East Anatolian highlands and the Black Sea Mts. Due to its location between the Black Sea and the Mediterranean Sea, the intersection of three phytogeographical regions, a highly varied geologic and climatic setting in addition to a dramatic geological past, the plant life of the different Anatolian mountains systems and isolated peaks is amazingly diverse and very rich in endemics. The chapter introduces all important high-mountain ranges, their zonation, major ecosystems, key vegetation types and floristic inventories. Based on a thorough phytogeographic analysis of the high-mountain flora and an evaluation of a wide range of floristic and phylogenetic studies, the diversity patterns of the Anatolian mountain systems and their floristic links to the adjacent areas are reviewed and mapped.
Background: The use of recombinant human follicle-stimulating hormone (r-hFSH) in ovarian stimulation protocols for infertility treatment in assisted reproductive technology (ART) clinical practice is well established. More recent advancements include the availability of biosimilar r-hFSH products, which expand the choices available to healthcare practitioners and patients. Better understanding of how such a product contributes to routine clinical practice is valuable to help prescribers make informed treatment choices. The objective of this study was to examine the effectiveness and safety of ovarian stimulation (OS) with follitropin alfa (Ovaleap®) for routine IVF or intracytoplasmic sperm injection treatment in gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonist cycles in real-world ART clinical practice. Methods: This non-interventional, multicenter, prospective study was initiated in 34 specialized reproductive medicine centers in Germany. Eligible women were 18-40 years old with a body mass index < 30 kg/m2, menstrual cycle 24-35 days and anti-Müllerian hormone ≥1 ng/mL, who were undergoing a first OS cycle exclusively with Ovaleap® during routine ART using a GnRH antagonist protocol. Primary effectiveness outcomes were number of retrieved oocytes after OS and clinical pregnancy rate (CPR). Secondary outcomes included fertilization rate, number of transferred embryos, live birth delivery rate, safety, and user satisfaction with the Ovaleap® pen. Result(s): Of 507 women screened, 463 received at least 1 dose of Ovaleap® and 439 had Visit 2 data (per protocol population; PPP). The mean(±SD) number of retrieved oocytes was 11.8 ± 7.2 (PPP). The CPR among women with documented embryo transfer was 41.3% (158/383), resulting in a live birth delivery rate of 31.6% (138/437) among PPP patients with available follow-up information. Overall, 8.6% (40/463) of women reported ≥1 adverse drug reaction. Ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome occurred in 23 (5.0%) patients, rated mild in 14 (3.0%), moderate in 8 (1.7%), and severe in 1 (0.2%). Patients reported high user satisfaction and high convenience with use of the Ovaleap® pen. Conclusion: The effectiveness and safety of OS with Ovaleap® in a GnRH antagonist protocol were extended to real-world ART clinical practice for the first time. Trial registration: Registered on 22 June 2016 (retrospectively registered) at ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT02809989).
Plants, fungi and algae are important components of global biodiversity and are fundamental to all ecosystems. They are the basis for human well-being, providing food, materials and medicines. Specimens of all three groups of organisms are accommodated in herbaria, where they are commonly referred to as botanical specimens. The large number of specimens in herbaria provides an ample, permanent and continuously improving knowledge base on these organisms and an indispensable source for the analysis of the distribution of species in space and time critical for current and future research relating to global biodiversity. In order to make full use of this resource, a research infrastructure has to be built that grants comprehensive and free access to the information in herbaria and botanical collections in general. This can be achieved through digitization of the botanical objects and associated data. The botanical research community can count on a long-standing tradition of collaboration among institutions and individuals. It agreed on data standards and standard services even before the advent of computerization and information networking, an example being the Index Herbariorum as a global registry of herbaria helping towards the unique identification of specimens cited in the literature. In the spirit of this collaborative history, 51 representatives from 30 institutions advocate to start the digitization of botanical collections with the overall wall-to-wall digitization of the flat objects stored in German herbaria. Germany has 70 herbaria holding almost 23 million specimens according to a national survey carried out in 2019. 87% of these specimens are not yet digitized. Experiences from other countries like France, the Netherlands, Finland, the US and Australia show that herbaria can be comprehensively and cost-efficiently digitized in a relatively short time due to established workflows and protocols for the high-throughput digitization of flat objects. Most of the herbaria are part of a university (34), fewer belong to municipal museums (10) or state museums (8), six herbaria belong to institutions also supported by federal funds such as Leibniz institutes, and four belong to non-governmental organizations. A common data infrastructure must therefore integrate different kinds of institutions. Making full use of the data gained by digitization requires the set-up of a digital infrastructure for storage, archiving, content indexing and networking as well as standardized access for the scientific use of digital objects. A standards-based portfolio of technical components has already been developed and successfully tested by the Biodiversity Informatics Community over the last two decades, comprising among others access protocols, collection databases, portals, tools for semantic enrichment and annotation, international networking, storage and archiving in accordance with international standards. This was achieved through the funding by national and international programs and initiatives, which also paved the road for the German contribution to the Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF). Herbaria constitute a large part of the German botanical collections that also comprise living collections in botanical gardens and seed banks, DNA- and tissue samples, specimens preserved in fluids or on microscope slides and more. Once the herbaria are digitized, these resources can be integrated, adding to the value of the overall research infrastructure. The community has agreed on tasks that are shared between the herbaria, as the German GBIF model already successfully demonstrates. We have compiled nine scientific use cases of immediate societal relevance for an integrated infrastructure of botanical collections. They address accelerated biodiversity discovery and research, biomonitoring and conservation planning, biodiversity modelling, the generation of trait information, automated image recognition by artificial intelligence, automated pathogen detection, contextualization by interlinking objects, enabling provenance research, as well as education, outreach and citizen science. We propose to start this initiative now in order to valorize German botanical collections as a vital part of a worldwide biodiversity data pool.
Aim: Alien plant species can cause severe ecological and economic problems, and therefore attract a lot of research interest in biogeography and related fields. To identify potential future invasive species, we need to better understand the mechanisms underlying the abundances of invasive tree species in their new ranges, and whether these mechanisms differ between their native and alien ranges. Here, we test two hypotheses: that greater relative abundance is promoted by (1) functional difference from locally co-occurring trees, and (2) higher values than locally co-occurring trees for traits linked to competitive ability. Location: Global. Time period: Present day. Major taxa studied: Trees. Methods: We combined three global plant databases: sPlot vegetation-plot database, TRY plant trait database, and GloNAF naturalized alien flora database. We used a hierarchical Bayesian linear regression model to assess the factors associated with variation in local abundance, and how these relationships vary between native and alien ranges and depend on species’ traits. Results: In both ranges, species reach highest abundance if they are functionally similar to co-occurring species, yet are taller and have higher seed mass and wood density than co-occurring species. Main conclusions: Our results suggest that light limitation leads to strong environmental and biotic filtering, and that it is advantageous to be taller and have denser wood. The striking similarities in abundance between native and alien ranges imply that information from tree species’ native ranges can be used to predict new habitats where introduced species may become dominant.
Thevariation of thediversity, composition, functional diversity and species richness of lichen com-munities along an altitudinal gradient in theChocó biogeographic region of thedepartment of Valle del Cauca, Colombia, is evaluated basing on 2732 samples belonging to 690 species of corticolous lichens. Thedominant families were Graphidaceae, Parmeliaceae, Lobariaceae and Pyrenulaceae. Alpha lichen diversity showed a concave pattern with respect to altitude, and thezones at low and high elevations had greater diversity. Beta diversity and total richness estimated by rarefaction for locality presented a bell-shaped pattern, with a peak at 1600m. Lichen functional traits strongly changed with theincrease of altitude. Functional diversity presented thesame pattern of total rich-ness estimated by rarefaction. These results suggest that thelichen communities of thealtitudinal extremes are structured by a strong environmental filter effect, while in theintermediate zones there is an overlap of functional traits, which is reflected in both a high functional and taxonomic diversity. Theresults suggest that thefunctional traits used are good substitutes for species to study altitudinal patterns. Thehigh number of indicator species for thealtitudinal extremes implies that in a context of climate change, these zones will be more susceptible to theloss of species
Poor morphological and molecular differentiation in recently diversified lineages is a widespread phenomenon in plants. Phylogenetic relationships within such species complexes are often difficult to resolve because of the low variability in traditional molecular loci, as well as various other biological phenomena responsible for topological incongruence such as ILS and hybridization. In this study, we employ a Genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) approach to disentangle evolutionary relationships within a species complex belonging to the Neotropical orchid genus Cycnoches. The complex includes seven taxa distributed in Central America and the adjacent Chocó biogeographic region, nested within a clade estimated to have first diversified in the early Quaternary. Previous phylogenies inferred from a handful of loci failed to provide support for internal relationships within the complex. Our Neighbor-net and coalescent-based analyses inferred from ca. 13,000 GBS loci obtained from 31 individuals belonging to six of the seven traditionally accepted Cycnoches species provided a robustly supported network. The resulting three main clades are corroborated by morphological traits and geographical distributions. Similarly, Maximum Likelihood (ML) inferences of concatenated GBS-loci produced results comparable with those derived from coalescence and network-based methods, albeit always with poor statistical support. The low support evident in the ML phylogeny might be attributed to the abundance of uninformative GBS loci, which can account for up to 50% of the total number of loci recovered. The phylogenomic framework provided here, as well as morphological evidence and geographical patterns, suggest that the six entities previously thought to be different species might actually represent only three distinct segregates. Our study is the first to demonstrate the utility of GBS data in phylogenomic research of a very young Neotropical plant clade (~2 Ma), and it paves the way for the study of the many other species complexes that populate the species-rich orchid family.
Poor morphological and molecular differentiation in recently diversified lineages is a widespread phenomenon in plants. Phylogenetic relationships within such species complexes are often difficult to resolve because of the low variability in traditional molecular loci, as well as various other biological phenomena responsible for topological incongruence such as ILS and hybridization. In this study, we employ a Genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) approach to disentangle evolutionary relationships within a species complex belonging to the Neotropical orchid genus Cycnoches . The complex includes seven taxa distributed in Central America and the adjacent Chocó biogeographic region, nested within a clade estimated to have first diversified in the early Quaternary. Previous phylogenies inferred from a handful of loci failed to provide support for internal relationships within the complex. Our Neighbor-net and coalescent-based analyses inferred from ca . 13,000 GBS loci obtained from 31 individuals belonging to six of the seven traditionally accepted Cycnoches species provided a robustly supported network. The resulting three main clades are corroborated by morphological traits and geographical distributions. Similarly, Maximum Likelihood (ML) inferences of concatenated GBS-loci produced results comparable with those derived from coalescence and network-based methods, albeit always with poor statistical support. The low support evident in the ML phylogeny might be attributed to the abundance of uninformative GBS loci, which can account for up to 50% of the total number of loci recovered. The phylogenomic framework provided here, as well as morphological evidence and geographical patterns, suggest that the six entities previously thought to be different species might actually represent only three distinct segregates. Our study is the first to demonstrate the utility of GBS data in phylogenomic research of a very young Neotropical plant clade (~2 Ma), and it paves the way for the study of the many other species complexes that populate the species-rich orchid family.
The genus Coenogonium Ehrenb. in Tasmania comprises seven species. New to science are: C. atherospermatis Kantvilas, Rivas Plata & Lücking, endemic to Tasmania and characterized by pale yellowish beige apothecia and relatively small ascospores, 6–8·5×2·5–3 µm; C. urceolatum Kantvilas, Rivas Plata & Lücking, likewise endemic to Tasmania and characterized by orange, urceolate apothecia, 0·3–0·4 mm wide, and uniseriate ascospores, 8·5–11×2·5–3 µm; and C. australiense Kantvilas & Lücking, recorded from Tasmania, South Australia and New South Wales, and characterized by orange apothecia, 0·5–2 mm wide, and relatively broad ascospores, 10–14×3–4·5 µm. Also treated are C. lutescens (Vĕzda & Malcolm) Malcolm (Tasmania and New Zealand) and three widespread taxa, namely C. implexum Nyl. (Southern Hemisphere), C. luteum (Dicks.) Kalb & Lücking and C. pineti (Schrad. ex Ach.) Lücking & Lumbsch (both subcosmopolitan). All species are described in full from Tasmanian collections and illustrated, and their ecology, variation and affinities to related species are discussed. The Tasmanian taxa are also discussed in the context of the Australasian lichen biota.
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11 members
Marco Schmidt
  • Gartenbau und Wissenschaft
Katja Heubach
  • Direktion
Hilke Steinecke
  • Gartenbau und Wissenschaft
Andreas König
  • Gartenbau und Wissenschaft
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Siesmayerstraße 61, 60323, Frankfurt am Main, Germany
Head of institution
Katja Heubach
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https://www.palmengarten.de