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    ABSTRACT: This article explores the spatio-temporal logics at work in global health. Influenced by ideas of time-space compression, the global health literature argues that the world is characterised by a convergence of disease patterns and biomedical knowledge. While not denying the influence of these temporalities and spatialities of globalisation within the global health and chronic disease field, the article argues that they sit alongside other, often-conflicting notions of time and space. To do so, it explores the spatio-temporal logics that underpin a highly influential epidemiological model of the smoking epidemic. Unlike the temporalities and spatialities of sameness described in much of the global health literature, the article shows that this model is articulated around temporalities and spatialities of difference. This is not the difference celebrated by postmoderns, but the difference of modernisation theorists built around nations, sequential stages and progress. Indeed, the model, in stark contrast to the 'one world, one time, one health' globalisation mantra, divides the world into nation-states and orders them along epidemiological, geographical and development lines. Copyright © 2015 The Author. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.
    Full-text · Article · May 2015 · Health & Place
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    ABSTRACT: Consumer genomics and mobile health provide health-related information to individuals and offer advice for lifestyle change. These ‘technologies for healthy lifestyle’ occupy an ambiguous space between the highly regulated medical domain and the less regulated consumer market. We argue that this ambiguity challenges implicit distinctions between what is medical and what is related to personal lifestyle choices within current regulatory systems. In this article, we discuss how consumer genomics and mobile health devices give rise to new ways of creating (and making sense of) health-related knowledge. We also address some of the implications of harnessing, rather than denying, the hybridity of mobile health devices, being situated between medical devices and consumer products, between health and lifestyle.
    Full-text · Article · Feb 2015 · Applied and Translational Genomics
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    ABSTRACT: This article investigates everyday experiences and practises that are associated with processes of pharmaceuticalization and with practices of ‘drug diversion’—that is, the illicit exchange and non-medical use of prescription drugs. It reports results from a qualitative study that was designed to examine the everyday dimensions of non-medical prescription stimulant use among students on an American university campus, which involved 38 semi-structured interviews with individuals who used prescription stimulants as a means of improving academic performance. While discussions of drug diversion are often framed in terms of broad, population-level patterns and demographic trends, the present analysis provides a complementary sociocultural perspective that is attuned to the local and everyday phenomena. Results are reported in relation to the acquisition of supplies of medications intended for nonmedical use. An analysis is provided which identifies four different sources of diverted medications (friends; family members; black-market vendors; deceived clinicians), and describes particular sets of understandings, practices and experiences that arise in relation to each different source. Findings suggest that at the level of everyday experience and practice, the phenomenon of prescription stimulant diversion is characterised by a significant degree of complexity and heterogeneity.
    Full-text · Article · Oct 2014 · Social Science & Medicine
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