Christelijke Hogeschool Ede
Recent publications
In this article, we analyse WhatsApp interactions in a youth care setting. In family-style group care, young people temporarily live in the family of professional foster parents (PFP), while they regularly visit their birth parents (BPs). Our data consist of instant messaging of 11 pairs of PFPs and BPs during 2 months. Using Conversation Analysis (CA), we focused on the social interaction between BPs and PFPs, achieved in and through multi-modally constructed sequences of updates—responses. First, updates are used by BPs in the context of the transfer from the child from/to the PFP marking the transfer of responsibility for the child. Second, PFPs use images as updates to provide BPs quasi-primary access to the experiences of the child. Third, updates are given or elicited in the context of prior problems. Across these functions, we observe that while BPs work to display responsibility, PFPs subtly empower BPs as parents.
Intergroup contexts of classrooms have an influence on mainstream and ethnic belonging of youth of immigrant descent. Based on the normative reference group theory, a higher level of ethic identification is expected in classrooms with a higher proportion of co-ethnic youth and, based on constrict theory, a lower level of mainstream identification is expected in ethnically more diverse classrooms. However, these relations between ethnic composition and cultural belonging may differ between countries due to differences in multicultural policies and colonial histories. Using two waves of data from CILS4EU survey, we conduct a cross-national comparison of the relation between intergroup contexts of classrooms and cultural belonging. The results imply that both theories cannot be generalized across national contexts, and other factors vary as well across countries. Therefore, research and policy in this area should pay more attention to the national context in terms of policies and histories.
Background: The target group of this study concerns young people with a mild intellectual disability. The central research question is: What evidence can be found in the literature for common and specific factors for a play therapy intervention for young people with a mild intellectual disability struggling with aggression regulation. Method: The criteria used for selecting articles are presented according to the PRISMA, and the PRISMA guidelines for writing a review have been applied. Results: Common factors have been found in the literature that relate to the relationship between therapist and client and the therapeutic skills of the play therapist. Clues have also been found for specific factors of play therapy, such as the use of play as a language and a connection with the child's inner world. In addition, certain factors have been found that are specific to the target group of this article. The non-verbal element of play therapy is an active part of this.
Ethnic identity is central to many contemporary discussions of belonging and assimilation of migrant-origin youth. Studies typically focus on a single minority identity. Identity theory implies, however, that individuals may hold multiple ethnic identities, or none, and these may find expression to a greater or less extent depending on context. Using a nationally representative, longitudinal study of Dutch teenagers, we investigate the role of classroom ethnic composition in shaping multiple ethnic identity expression. Framing identity choices as a relational process, we show that the number of ethnic identities that children with a migrant-origin background choose is greater for those students who are exposed to a more ethnically diverse context, while less diverse classrooms foster ethnic identification with no or fewer minority groups. Classification of migrant-origin students with a single (minority) ethnicity may thus be an oversimplification of ethnic identity, even for those from a single country of origin.
This article is concerned with the theological implications of God’s laughter as pictured in Psalm 2:4 in view of sketching a basic comic theology proper. Since laughter is conceived by some as an overwhelming human emotion, divine laughter can be problematic. To make its case for a comic theology proper, the biblical scholarship with regard to Psalm 2 is first explored in order to establish the psalm’s content, then the current debate on im/passibility is explored to determine what is at stake in attributing emotions to God. Subsequently, the reading strategies of both analytic and narrative theology are followed to assess the theological implications of divine laughter in Psalm 2. It is concluded that divine laughter can be proper to God as an affectionate act to bring justice and reconciliation on earth.
In dit artikel presenteren we de uitkomsten van een grootschalig praktijkgericht onderzoek naar de relatie tussen gezinshuisouders en ouders van jeugdigen die niet meer thuis kunnen wonen. De volgende onderzoeksvraag was daarbij leidend: Welke aanpak om tot een constructieve samenwerkingsrelatie te komen tussen ouders en gezinshuisouders, in de zorg en opvoeding van een jongere die niet meer thuis kan wonen, kan worden ontleend aan theorie en praktijk? Het onderzoek bestaat uit vier fasen waarin achtereenvolgens: 1) een verkenning is gedaan naar wat samenwerking constructief maakt; 2) een verdieping is gedaan door naar concrete samenwerkingsituaties te kijken; 3) is geverifieerd of de analyse van de eerste twee fases voldoende verklaring biedt voor constructieve samenwerking en wat belangrijke bestanddelen zijn van een aanpak waarin samenwerking centraal staat; 4) In de laatste fase zijn de uitkomsten gevaloriseerd door te komen tot een aanpak: een relationele route tot gedeeld opvoederschap.
Background Changes in adolescent dietary and sedentary behaviors contribute to adolescence being one of the most vulnerable periods for the development of overweight and overweight-related morbidity. Children become more autonomous during adolescence, particularly in regard to decision-making over their own health behaviors. Despite this expanding autonomy, parents still play a major role in shaping health behaviors of adolescents and can still have influence on children’s weight outcomes. There is rising evidence that maternal stress and depressive symptoms are associated with young children’s weight outcomes. Longitudinal studies that test whether maternal stress or depressive symptoms may precede the development of adolescents’ weight outcomes are rare. This study aimed to fill this gap. Methods In this longitudinal cohort study data from 336 mothers and adolescents aged 10–14 years was used. Adolescents height and weight were measured, and both parents and adolescents filled in questionnaires on perceived stress and depressive symptoms. Regression analyses were performed in R to examine longitudinal links between stress and depressive symptoms at baseline (T1) and adolescents’ zBMI 6 months later (T2). Results Maternal general perceived stress (β = .14, p = .01) at T1 preceded the development of higher adolescents’ zBMI at T2, after controlling for baseline zBMI and other covariates, whereas maternal depressive symptoms at T1 (β = .04, p = .40) and other domain specific stress did not (maternal financial stress, maternal stress at work, maternal stress at home). Additionally, lower educational level among adolescents was associated with a higher zBMI at T2 (β = .16, p = .001). Conclusions Results suggest that maternal general stress, but not depressive symptoms, may influence adolescents’ weight development. Our findings warrant future investigation on whether and how general stress among mothers, but also fathers, may predict weight increases of their adolescent offspring.
Background Growing evidence suggests that maternal mental health issues are associated with (young) children’s weight outcomes. However, most studies have been limited by cross-sectional designs and have been aimed at (younger) children. The current prospective study focuses on the link between maternal mental health (i.e., psychological stress and depressive symptoms) and adolescents’ zBMI development. Methods The participants in the present study were part of wave 1 and 2 of a longitudinal study on Dutch adolescents’ and their parents’ health behavior. Adolescents (aged 10-14) and their parents were recruited through six secondary schools in the South and the East of the Netherlands. For this study, we only included biological mothers and their adolescent children who participated in both waves, with data on the main measures on both waves, leaving a final sample of 336 biological mother child dyads. Adolescents height and weight were measured, and both parents and adolescents filled in validated questionnaires on perceived stress and depressive symptoms and answered additional questions concerning domain-specific stress. Regression analyses were performed in R to examine longitudinal links between maternal stress and depressive symptoms at baseline (T1) and adolescents’ BMI standard deviation scores (zBMI) 6 months later (T2), corrected for baseline zBMI and covariates. Results Maternal general perceived stress (b=.20, p =.002) at T1 preceded higher adolescents’ zBMI at T2, after controlling for baseline zBMI and other covariates, whereas maternal depressive symptoms at T1 (b=-.05, p =.44) and other domain-specific stress did not (maternal financial stress, maternal stress at work, maternal stress at home). Additionally, lower educational level among adolescents (b = .16, p = .001) and adolescent depressive symptoms (b = .16, p = .001) was associated with a higher zBMI at T2. Conclusions Results suggest that maternal general stress, but not depressive symptoms, may influence adolescents’ weight development. Our findings warrant future investigation on whether and how general stress among mothers may predict weight increases of their adolescent offspring.
In this article, we have focused on irritation as a discourse marker for professional foster parents to intervene in adolescents’ disputes. We were interested in how irritation leads to responses from people who are not the object of irritation themselves, but who intervene in the dispute, thus entering and changing the social situation. Four types of responses could be distinguished: 1) responding to the content of the dispute, 2) responding to the process of the dispute, 3) responding to the emotion of the adolescent or 4) ignoring the dispute. Although most cases in our sample seem to exhibit a main strategy that fits this categorisation, in 10 cases different strategies are combined. We showed that in these combined responses professional foster parents do not intervene merely for disciplinary reasons, although they do so when things threaten to get out of hand. They also use these occasions as teachable moments.
Verpleegkundigen hebben de verantwoordelijkheid om gegevens te registreren over de kwaliteit van zorg. Potentiele verpleegpro- blemen als ondervoeding, valincidenten, decubitus, pijn, en delier zijn daarvoor indicatoren. Verpleegkundigen en verzorgenden vinden dit weliswaar belangrijk, maar ervaren het scoren van zulke complicatierisico’s vaak ook als een administratieve last. Welke factoren er nu precies voor zorgen dat ze meer of minder geneigd zijn om die kwaliteitsgegevens te verzamelen, was onbekend. Dit onderzoek moet daar meer licht op werpen.
Het is algemeen bekend dat kwetsbare ouderen bij een opname in het ziekenhuis een hoger risico op complicaties hebben. Vier studenten van de Christelijke Hogeschool Ede onderzochten in het St. Antonius Ziekenhuis Utrecht/Nieuwegein het belang van tijdig herkennen en labelen van een kwetsbare oudere, en het effect van een alert in het EPD.
Parents indirectly influence their children's peer interactions by implicit socialization and directly by interference. They influence their (young) children's doings by supervising their contacts with friends, monitoring where they go, and facilitating their meetings with friends at home. Adolescents' growing orientation to peers is often at the cost of direct contact with their parents. Potentially, conversations with adolescent children become significant moments for parents to collect information about their children's social lives, preparing them for the challenges of their preadult social life. We studied conversations between in state-created family homes amongst foster parents (FPs) and out-of-home-placed adolescents, to see how FPs prepare foster adolescents to deal with the dynamics of peer culture, specifically in mocking practices. We are interested in the pedagogical role of FPs in these practices. We find that peer culture behavior is expressed in the context of family homes. Rather than preparing adolescents for peer culture indirectly by discussing possible, or hypothetical, situations, FPs react directly to peer culture expressions at the dinner table. In their approach, FPs demonstrate that peer culture membership is not just an interactional competence but also a teachable issue.
In de samenwerking met officiële instanties en samenwerkingspartners worden er steeds meer gegevens van de cliënten uitgewisseld zonder dat zij daarvoor toestemming (hoeven te) geven. In sommige gevallen zou toestemming zelfs geen valide basis zijn om gegevens met een gemeente of andere overheidsinstanties uit te wisselen. Wat is de basis van een dergelijke uitwisseling van gegevens? Tot welke dynamiek dit heeft geleid binnen het sociaal domein en wat kunnen we er aan doen?
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1,285 members
Sake Stoppels
  • Faculty of Theology
M. Noordegraaf
  • Lectoraat Jeugd en Gezin
Jaap van der Meiden
  • Researchgroup Youth and Family
Ria den Hertog
  • Department of Nursing
Information
Address
Oude Kerkweg 100, 6717 JS, Ede, Netherlands
Head of institution
Harmen van Wijnen
Website
https://che.nl/
Phone
+31318696300