Antioch University Seattle
  • Seattle, United States
Recent publications
The School Librarian Investigation—Decline or Evolution? (SLIDE) project is a federally funded study of the almost 20% national decline in the number of full-time equivalents (FTEs) of school librarians between 2015 and 2019, according to the National Center for Education Statistics. In this update to the project’s original research, school librarian employment data for the 2020-2021 school year were examined for 12,537 school districts and associated with district characteristics (poverty, locale, and district enrollment) and student demographics (race and ethnicity). Data supported previous findings that access to school librarians is strongly related to race and ethnicity and further exacerbated for students living in extreme poverty, in more-isolated locales, and in the smallest districts—locales where students are less likely to have access to the educational resources available in large urban areas. In school year 2021, 54% of U.S. students in all districts were without any librarians during the COVID-19 pandemic and almost 3 million students in majority nonwhite districts were without any librarians. The gap between students in districts with a “library privilege” and those without librarians continues to widen.
Introduction Although the American Psychological Association encourages clinical psychologists to recognize and understand the experience of social privilege both within themselves and the individuals and communities they serve, there is a dearth of research in the field to guide this pursuit. According to the available literature, an essential barrier to social privilege integration is its implicit and covert nature that prevents consistent consciousness due to hegemonic forces. Methods This study explored the process, from initial social privilege awareness to the moment of the study, through individual interviews. A social-constructivist, grounded theory approach was utilized as it was aligned with the understudied phenomena oriented around social justice. Results The result is a developmental model of social privilege integration that explicates accumulated exposures to privilege, the resultant threat to and protection of personal identity, and the conducive factors that lead to reconciliation. Discussion Implications of this theoretical model include the importance of a developmental perspective to cultivate an understanding of individual prejudice attitudes and discriminatory behaviors, as well as a roadmap toward equitable change. This model may be used by clinical psychologists across multiple settings in response to the most recent APA multicultural guidelines.
In this essay, we use vignettes to portray our journeys toward, affiliations to and contentions with the “teacher educator” identity. By drawing on critical self-reflection, radical vulnerability and our collaborative discussions and work, we suggest that the formation of a teacher educator identity is relational, tied to emotion and embodied experiences, and career-long. We close with a series of critical questions meant to model the work we believe future teachers and teacher educators can engage in as they negotiate self and sustain a commitment to racial and linguistic equity.
The healthcare workforce in the United States is becoming increasingly diverse, gradually shifting society away from the historical overrepresentation of White men among physicians. However, given the long-standing underrepresentation of people of color and women in the medical field, patients may still associate the concept of doctors with White men and may be physiologically less responsive to treatment administered by providers from other backgrounds. To investigate this, we varied the race and gender of the provider from which White patients received identical treatment for allergic reactions and measured patients' improvement in response to this treatment, thus isolating how a provider's demographic characteristics shape physical responses to healthcare. A total of 187 White patients experiencing a laboratory-induced allergic reaction interacted with a healthcare provider who applied a treatment cream and told them it would relieve their allergic reaction. Unbeknownst to the patients, the cream was inert (an unscented lotion) and interactions were completely standardized except for the provider's race and gender. Patients were randomly assigned to interact with a provider who was a man or a woman and Asian, Black, or White. A fully blinded research assistant measured the change in the size of patients' allergic reaction after cream administration. Results indicated that White patients showed a weaker response to the standardized treatment over time when it was administered by women or Black providers. We explore several potential explanations for these varied physiological treatment responses and discuss the implications of problematic race and gender dynamics that can endure "under the skin," even for those who aim to be bias free.
This article explores how De-sign (the fusion of design and signs) can be utilized as a navigational trajectory toward the integration of cultural sensitivity and environmental sensibility. It affirms that intentionality makes it possible for human beings to make meaning of their world. Navigating through trajectories for the purpose of seeking desired outcomes is a reiterative de-sign process that is constantly adjusting pragmatically. Because de-sign outcomes are only invariant aspects of the unfolding process of synechism and palingenesia, every de-sign situation is a unique journey toward infinite possibilities of creation. De-signers, as agents of intentional change, become envoys of meaning-making that can integrate cultural sensitivity and environmental sensibility. De-sign intentionality makes our trajectories move toward envisioning a meaningful reality, one that goes beyond the schism between culture and nature, between built environment and natural environment. Trajectories innate to the de-sign process transform us into not only lifelong-learners competent of questioning absolute knowledge but also changing agents capable of moving beyond merely being inquisitive, to being reflective, contemplative knowers, genuinely integrating all aspects of the great biosemiosphere.
The person of the therapist (POTT) framework is a model of therapist training that can enhance clinicians' attunement and further clinical efficacy. In this autoethnography, two graduate school professors of colour detail their experience of implementing the POTT framework overlaid to academic work. This article presents specific arguments for the use of this model as it furthers therapist accountability and responsiveness. The model's advantages in clinical graduate training are also reviewed. Keywords: person of the therapist, self of the therapist, clinical training, education, attunement, responsiveness Key Points 1 The article offers a unique framework for the knowledge and development of the self of the therapist. 2 Universities can enhance ethical training opportunities for students in clinically focused programs. 3 Person of the therapist provides a template for individuals to enhance clinical experiences of clients. 4 Inclusion of therapist factors when considering common factors. 5 Family therapists can be leaders in the field of psychotherapy by training attuned clinicians. Person of the therapist (POTT) is a therapeutic framework that was first developed and introduced at Drexel University in their Master's program in the Couple and Family Therapy (CFT) department (Aponte et al., 2009). This framework aims to embrace the 'wounded healer' present in all therapists but also challenges the current acceptance of what self-of-the-therapist matters consist of, that is, self-matters have largely been reviewed through the lens of navigating countertransference within the field of psychotherapy at large, rather than the active development of self. By contrast, POTT embraces the personhood of the therapist, in order to encourage trainees to be accountable for their own responses, including the active use of the therapeutic relationship to enhance positive goals for therapy (Aponte & M endez, 2014; Lutz & Irizarry, 2009). Traditional models of Western psychotherapy focus directly on coun-tertransference when discussing self-of-the-therapist matters in training. In our view this reduces the humanity of the therapist to a simple reflection of the client's projections only. Instead, the POTT model focuses on a multitude of variables that have to do with the therapist's personhood. During the implementation of this program at Drexel, the creators and developers of the model saw students transform in how they viewed themselves, interacted with their clients, and managed their emotions and experiences in sessions. The POTT framework has published information that points to the increased competency and empathy gained by clinicians that engaged in this training (Aponte & Kissil, 2014).
Perhaps in part because it never ratified the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC), the United States neither systematically focuses on children’s personalities or talents nor ensures the respect and valuing of students’ culture, as specified in Article 29 of the UNCRC. Instead, narrow conceptions of success and the particularly insidious influences of White supremacist and anti-immigrant perspectives undermine the rights outlined in Article 29. Despite these conditions, individual educators attempt to foster rights-centred education that prioritises the perspectives, personalities, and cultures of young people. We present one example of such efforts: “Teaching and Learning Together,” which positions secondary students as pedagogical partners to undergraduate, secondary teacher candidates. This project enables deep engagement with the perspectives of students—a necessary foundation for teachers who foster the personalities, talents, and cultures of their students. Providing grounding for appreciation of the rich knowledge and deep insight students and their communities bring—and an understanding of participation in their own education as a right—this program represents one model for developing the capacities among teachers in the United States necessary to realising the goals of Article 29 as an ethical imperative in the absence of any national commitment.
In response to COVID‐19, a couple and family therapy (CFT) graduate training program integrated a teaming therapy model with virtual technology using mixed‐reality simulation software. By utilizing teaming therapy‐‐a model with strong roots in systemic theory and practice‐‐ combined with cutting‐edge simulation technology, this distance learning modality provides distinctly relational therapy supervision and training for students at a time when their internships sites are struggling to offer remote clinical services due to the pandemic. This integrative framework offers a high degree of both realism and safety, allowing experiential learning to be appropriately scaffolded for optimum creativity and engagement in an online setting. This paper describes the conceptual, systemic basis for the learning modality, steps for implementation, benefits of the model, and the authors plan for further evaluation.
In the early United States, there was both the reality of interracial mixing and the legal prohibition of it as soon as Europeans arrived. Innately racist social policies of segregation aimed to prevent the spread of perceived undesirable traits by criminalizing sex, cohabitation, and marriage between a White individual and an individual of color. E. Stonequist was the first scholar to address biracial identity development. He asserts that the biracial nature of the individual creates a need to reconcile two distinct and antagonistic cultures. Rockquemore's exploration into multiracial identity found that biracial identity development tends to be more fluid than it is static and opined four racial self‐identity options: traditional identity, border identity, protean identity, and transcendent identity. In the 2000s, the research has continued to delve into more specific areas of biracial identity, such as different ethnic identities (e.g. Asian and Hispanic) and gender differences.
The term cultural encapsulation was coined in 1962 to describe the tendency of counselors to avoid the reality that their beliefs, values, education, training, and practice are informed by a specific culturally bound lens. Despite improvements in multicultural training and education over the last half century, cultural encapsulation is still prevalent throughout the field of counseling and psychology, including in the APA Code of Ethics.
The Urban Environmental Education M.A.Ed. program at Antioch University Seattle prepares graduates to work successfully in urban communities on issues of climate, health, and environmental integrity. Academics, on-the-ground practice, and participatory action research push the boundaries and pedagogy of traditional environmental education to intersect dynamically with race, equity, inclusion, and culture. Graduates (90% of whom are currently employed) work with each other to create safe and bold spaces where difficult issues can be explored. The program prides itself on its diversity in the student body and the faculty, changing the way that environmental education plays out in urban communities.
In the early United States, there was both the reality of interracial mixing and the legal prohibition of it as soon as Europeans arrived. Innately racist social policies of segregation aimed to prevent the spread of perceived undesirable traits by criminalizing sex, cohabitation, and marriage between a White individual and an individual of color. E. Stonequist was the first scholar to address biracial identity development. He asserts that the biracial nature of the individual creates a need to reconcile two distinct and antagonistic cultures. Rockquemore's exploration into multiracial identity found that biracial identity development tends to be more fluid than it is static and opined four racial self‐identity options: traditional identity, border identity, protean identity, and transcendent identity. In the 2000s, the research has continued to delve into more specific areas of biracial identity, such as different ethnic identities (e.g. Asian and Hispanic) and gender differences.
The term cultural encapsulation was coined in 1962 to describe the tendency of counselors to avoid the reality that their beliefs, values, education, training, and practice are informed by a specific culturally bound lens. Despite improvements in multicultural training and education over the last half century, cultural encapsulation is still prevalent throughout the field of counseling and psychology, including in the APA Code of Ethics.
Review of: Acting for Real: Drama Therapy Process, Technique, and Performance , Renée Emunah (2020) 2nd ed., New York and Oxon: Routledge, 382 pp., ISBN 978-1-13884-964-8, h/bk, $120; ISBN 978-1-13884-965-5, p/bk, $35.96; ISBN: 978-1-31572-540-6, e/bk, $35.96
Under the powerful influence of the Cartesian split, American psychotherapy theories usually take for granted the separation of the sociopolitical and the psychological. The intellectual movement referred to as The Interpretive Turn, composed of postmodernism and hermeneutics, directly opposes the split. Drawing from hermeneutic conceptions of the cultural clearing, the everyday social experience of similarity and difference, and Gadamer’s description of dialogue, psychotherapy can be thought of as an encounter with difference. This way of conceiving of therapy opposes the split and welcomes Kohut’s concept of the group self as an early approach to cultural history. This way of conceiving of similarity and difference aids in meeting the challenges—such as those related to race, gender, sexual orientation, and class—therapists confront in their everyday practices. It is also suggested that some therapists could engage in the role of public intellectual, thus bringing more psychologically sophisticated interpretations of our current political struggles over authoritarianism and democracy. In that way a hermeneutic cultural history could aid in combating the rise of neo-fascism in the United States and throughout the world, and in developing ways of building a more humane society dedicated to the well-being of all its inhabitants.
Presents an obituary for Edward E. Sampson (1934-2019). Sampson was a brilliant critical psychologist and social commentator. As a child he aspired to become "a song and dance man" but settled for being an inspiring teacher, ground-breaking writer, and skillful (and humorous) public speaker. When he laughed or danced, he bore a remarkable likeness to the famous Gene Kelly. He was effortlessly charismatic and yet suspicious of the leader-follower dynamic, a tension that moved him to eschew public leadership roles and self-promotion. Sampson's sociopolitical vision, personal and professional integrity, and creative intelligence are an inspiration to all who read his work, knew him, or learned from him. The world is a poorer place for his absence. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2020 APA, all rights reserved).
Working on What Works (WOWW) is a manualized, 10‐week classroom intervention based on solution‐focused brief therapy. This study evaluates WOWW using a randomized experimental, posttest‐only design. The study included 30 fourth and fifth grade classrooms, containing 30 teachers and 413 students. Results indicate no significant differences between WOWW and control groups for student internalizing and externalizing behaviors, student‒teacher relationships, student academic performance, or teacher sense of efficacy. However, students in the WOWW group had significantly fewer days absent from school compared with the control group. Additionally, teachers' ratings on WOWW classrooms' performance improved significantly more than teachers' ratings on the control classrooms. Results from this study show that WOWW is a feasible intervention for therapists to use in schools and can be implemented across classrooms in both public and private schools. WOWW has potential to improve student attendance and classroom performance, both of which are important areas of concern for schools.
Prior research has identified the need for a greater understanding of the individual utility of independent subjective well-being factors. This article explores the effect of positive affect, negative affect, and feelings of belonging on life satisfaction among older adults in the United States. Ordinal regression analysis identified that positive affect demonstrated more predictive power in predictive overall life satisfaction than negative affect or feeling of belonging. Correlations were found between life satisfaction and positive affect, negative affect, and feeling of belonging. These findings indicate that interventions aimed to increase quality of life among older adults can improve life satisfaction, while still providing secondary benefits in decreasing negative affect and increasing feelings of belonging. This research suggests that applied quality of life studies to improve lives of seniors focus on interventions that increase positive affect. Where interventions have not yet been measured, this study suggests that measuring changes in participant positive affect could be simple method of identifying the potential for a program’s utility in increasing life satisfaction.
Objective: Suicidality and depression are disproportionately prevalent among veterinarians. Researchers for this study sought to explore the lived experiences of veterinarians in order to better identify the factors that contribute to this phenomenon. Method: Using a qualitative descriptive phenomenological approach, small animal veterinarians in the greater Seattle area were interviewed and provided their respective occupational experiences as they related to depression, suicidality, and coping. Results: Analysis of the interviews revealed attachment loss and trauma to be primary factors contributing to veterinary depression and suicidality. Conclusions: These findings provide the basis for future research and trauma-informed interventions to reduce distress and suicidality in this population. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2019 APA, all rights reserved).
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442 members
Phoebe Rose Katz
  • Department of Psychology
David Gellman
  • Department of Psychology
Farouk Seif
  • Graduate Programs in Leadership and Change
Mark C Russell
  • Director, Institute of War Stress Injury, Recovery, and Social Justice
Sheila Addison
  • Department of Psychology
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Seattle, United States