table 3 - uploaded by Hazem Gouda
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the material components used for each of the options. 

the material components used for each of the options. 

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A water-secure world is one where everyone has access to safe, affordable water, protected from floods, droughts and water-borne diseases. Urban water security means that urban water systems should not have negative environmental effects, even over a long time perspective, while providing required services, protecting human health and the environme...

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... this study the materials, energy, natural resources, transportation, use and disposal were analysed. Table 3 gives an overview of the material used for the SW management options. Data from specific manufacturers of the products implemented for each option and data from the SimaPro database were utilised where data for the specific process were not available. ...

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... We heard that in many cases there were alternatives to their use, especially in cosmetics, or there was "no need for these items to be there in the first place".' This is an approach echoed in the literature (Gouda, 2014). A major issue here is that there is no regulation relating to the use of plastic in many products, so when manufacturers have switched from biodegradable to plastic materials there has been no legal disincentive. ...
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