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Previous research has questioned the use of mosques as points of entry for research about Muslims in Europe. Part of the background has been a new emphasis on lived religion and a critique of a one-sided focus on religious institutions. We argue that some of this criticism is theoretically ill-founded and we also point out that some trends may make...

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... from https://jyllandsposten.dk/premium/indland/ECE8145237/Muslimske-stemmer-Alle-meningsm%C3%A5lingerne questionnaire was sent out by e-mail through networks that we had access to through the same organizations. The two methods in effect created two different samples and in Table 2 (adapted from Brekke 2018, see footnote 24) it is clear that the profile of the people in the two samples were different in terms of gender, age and frequency of visits to the mosque. We saw that the modes used had a large effect on the profile of our sample and this made us more aware of the importance of sampling strategies when executing the larger FINEX project in the Nordic countries 2017-2020. ...

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Chapter
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