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Phytic acid is a substance found in many types of plant foods, such as grains, legumes (including peanuts and soybeans), nuts, and seeds. It is the storage form of phosphorus, an important mineral used in the production of energy as well as the formation of structural elements like cell membranes (Jacela et al., 2010). These foods, are getting a ba...

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... legumes, it's found in the cotyledon layer. Table 1. Shows different concentrated sources of phytic acid (% dry wt.) ...

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... Foods high in phytic acid are getting a bad reputation due to their ability to bind to essential minerals such as iron, zinc, calcium, and magnesium in the digestive tract and inhibit their absorption by the body [46]. e phytate content observed in this study was between 69.14 and 446.11 mg/100 g. e lowest phytate was recorded in the Ethiopia kale, while the highest was observed in the carrot. ...
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... [5] It is known to interact directly with proteins below their pI, but also above their pI through bridging with divalent cations thereby forming complexes. [45] Those cations as well phosphorous were found in much higher quantity in the soluble fraction ( Table 1). ...
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... PA stores in seeds, nuts, legumes and grains in fairly high quantity on weight basis, about 1-5% of human needs. About 70% of its weight is made of P. It can attach iron, zinc and calcium along with other ions (Garcia-Estepa et al., 1999;Erdal et al., 2002;Mate and Radomir, 2002;Gallaher, 2012;Nissar et al., 2017;Perera et al., 2018), which can cause deficiency of micronutrients in food due to less diversity in available food. PA is present up to 5% in some brans increasing its chances to be in food chain. ...
... Phytic acid is considered an anti-nutritional factor because it forms insoluble complexes by combining with proteins and several minerals (Zn, Ca, and Fe). This interaction may effect changes in protein structure and protein solubility which render them unavailable for intestinal absorption in humans and animals [45]. ...
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... In legumes, phytic acid is found in the cotyledon layer and can be removed prior to consumption (Nissar et al. 2017). However, the removal of phytic acid increases the bioavailability of many cations and thus the nutritional value of the meal. ...
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... Phytate is highly concentrated in the bran of grains (Wcislo and Szarlej-Wcislo, 2014). Phytic acid is found in the cotyledon layer and can be removed before consumption in legumes (Nissar et al., 2017). ...
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