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12 ribs with 60° rotation, extrusion 5mm Vrib: 400mm/min, Vcyl: 800 mm/min

12 ribs with 60° rotation, extrusion 5mm Vrib: 400mm/min, Vcyl: 800 mm/min

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Conference Paper
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This paper presents intermediate results of an experimental research directed towards development of a method to use additive manufacturing technology as a generative agent in architectural design process. The primary technique is to variate speed of material deposition of a 3D printer in order to produce undetermined textural effects. These effect...

Context in source publication

Context 1
... G-code lower and upper cylinder bases are subdi- vided into segments, end points of corresponding segments are connected and then the top base is rotated around z-axis (Mohite, Kochneva and Kotnik 2017) . That produces ribbed pattern if speed is set to be slower at end points of segments ( Figure 1). When speed is higher at those points than at the rest of cylinder, tesselation pattern is observable (Fig- ure 5). ...

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... 27 This work was continued in studies that explored intentional errors in 3D printing, generated by deliberately tweaking a 3D printer's G-code and hardware setup. 28,29 Owing to these studies, knowledge on the aesthetics of imprecision in the context of 3D printing is now quite broad. At the same time, however, the aesthetic of imprecision for other fabrication techniques remains unexplored. ...
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