Context in source publication

Context 1
... the other two varieties ranged from 400 -431.52 mg/100g to 600 -625 mg/100g as they ripened. The total polyphenol composition of the ba- Table 5 shows the pH of unripened and ripened banana fruit samples. The un- ripened banana samples such as Un, Up and Ur the pH ranged from 5.78 -5.92. ...

Similar publications

Article
Full-text available
Ballet African violets ( Saintpaulia ionantha Wend. cvs. Ulli and Lisa) were grown in a peat-vermiculite-perlite mix using capillary mat subirrigation in the summer and winter. Rates of 0.9, 1.8, 2.7, and 3.6 kg of Osmocote 14-14-14 (14N-6.1P-11.6K) per m ³ of growing medium were either top-dressed, incorporated, or placed in the bottom of the pot....

Citations

... According to Oyeyinka and Afolayan (2019) and Chandra et al. (2020), edible bananas contain approximately 90 calories, 70 g of water, 27 g of carbohydrates, 0.3 g of fat, 1.2 g of protein, 0.5 g of fiber, 385 to 500 mg of K, 30 to 35 mg of Mg, 22 to 30 mg of P, 3 to 8 mg of Ca, 0.42 to 0.60 mg of Fe, 10 to 20 mg of vitamin C, 0.18 mg of Zn and 0.51 mg of rib. This nutrient profile makes bananas essential for fighting malnutrition (Kookal and Thimmaiah, 2018) and meeting the dietary requirements of people across ages and regions (Dotto et al., 2019). Rai et al. (2018) discovered 43 local banana cultivars across all regencies and cities in Bali. ...
... The analysis was carried out to provide a foundational dataset for future development and consumer awareness, thereby contributing to the preservation of genetic resources in supporting the sustainability of the Bali banana cultivars. According to Kookal and Thimmaiah (2018), the variations in the nutritional composition of bananas offer the potential for developing value-added products. Dotto et al. (2019) stated that bananas in foodinsecure areas can substitute staple foods through innovative recipes. ...
Article
Full-text available
Bali is home to at least 43 banana cultivars, each serving a wide range of purposes. To support its future development, there is a need to obtain essential information on the morphological and nutritional characteristics of these bananas for domestic needs and the tourism market. Therefore, this study aimed to analyze the fruit morphology and nutritional composition of six local Balinese banana cultivars mainly consumed on Bali Island, namely Pisang Mas (AA), Buluh (AAA), Lumut (AAA), Susu (AAB), Raja (ABB) and Kepok (ABB) genomes. The observation of fruit morphology followed the guidelines of the International Plant Genetic Resources Institute method for bananas. The nutritional composition was analyzed using standard methods by measuring the proximate composition, vitamin C and concentrations of minerals K, Ca, Fe and P. Based on the morphological relationship coefficient values, it was discovered that all banana cultivars were closely related. Dessert bananas of Pisang Mas, Buluh, Lumut and Susu shared a close relationship with their ancestor Musa acuminata , which contributed to the ‘A’ genome. Meanwhile, Pisang Raja, which could be employed as a dessert or cooking banana, and Pisang Kepok as a cooking banana, exhibited a closer relationship. Various cultivars showed different nutritional compositions in their fruits. In every 100 g of edible portion, the nutrient values of the six bananas contained high carbohydrates and total energy, abundant vitamin C and K, moderate total fibers and protein, as well as low fat and Fe. Based on the nutritional composition, six Bali banana cultivars were found suitable as valuable ingredients in alleviating food insecurity or as dietary components.
... Because of the complex and non-homogeneous composition (elemental and molecular) of bananas [25], typical Raman spectra are bound to have an intense fluorescence background as well as multiple overlapping bands or no peaks in a very noisy background. This implies that the accurate characterization and determination of artificial ripeners in bananas using the classical Raman spectroscopy approach is not straightforward. ...
Article
Full-text available
We present a novel method, chemometric-assisted laser Raman spectroscopy, for the direct, rapid, and simultaneous screening of harmful chemical additives such as sulfur, acetylene, calcium hydroxide, and phosphine in carbide-ripened bananas. The method entails (i) obtaining spot laser Raman spectral measurements (~ 10 s) from naturally and carbide-ripened bananas, (ii) optimizing the measurements through spectral data pre-treatment techniques and feature selection, and (iii) using principal component analysis to identify the molecular fingerprint regions useful for confirming the presence of calcium carbide. Overall, the turnaround time for the results using this method is approximately 10 min, which is significantly less than that of conventional wet chemistry methods, which would require more than 4 h. Finally, the sulfur wave-shift range (450–500 cm−1) was found to be the most accurate (accuracy = 94%, kappa = 0.87) in the discrimination of naturally and carbide-ripened banana samples.
... The crude fiber content was lower (0.72 g/100 g) than previous studies which ranged from 0.92 to 2.79 g/100 g [21]; 1.58-2.42 g/100 g in ripe banana cultivars Nendran, Njali poovan and Robusta [23]. This indicates that, it has to be supplemented with fiber rich foods. ...
... This indicates that, it has to be supplemented with fiber rich foods. Similarly, the protein content was comparable (4.03 g/100 g) with an earlier study in ripe banana cultivars Nendran, Njali poovan and Robusta cultivated across Southern Indian districts ranging from 3.25 to 4.95 [23] and higher than the values reported for unripe Mchare cooking banana ranging from 0.61 to 1.75 g/100 g [21] respectively. The variation in the nutritional composition has been observed across different developmental stages of banana and also with change in climate and soil conditions. ...
... The potassium/sodium balance is fine-tuned and important for the transmission of electrical The fat content was 0.24 g/100 g and the findings were in comparable with an earlier study reporting 0.09 to 0.60 g/100 g. Contrarily, the moisture content (16.07 g/100 g) was significantly lower than other reported ripe banana cultivars; 66.26-75.25 g/100 g in the ripe fruits of South Indian banana cultivars [23]; 77.77 g/100 g in case of biofertilized commercially cultivated ripe Grand Naine banana [24]. Our findings reveal improved shelf life and keeping quality of Nanjangud Rasabale than other commercial cultivars of banana. ...
Article
Full-text available
Background Locally adapted native indigenous plant species (NIPS) could restore the crop diversity in sustainable agriculture.Methods Here, we report the molecular identification and nutritional profiling of some five NIPS of Karnataka; Musa paradisiaca cv. Nanjangud rasabale, Piper betle L. cv. Mysore betel leaf, Jasminum grandiflorum cv Mysore mallige, Solanum melongena L. cv. Udupi Mattu Gulla and S. melongena L. cv. Erangere badane of which the first four are Geographical Indication (GI) tagged. The samples were procured, authenticated and sequenced using two standard DNA barcodes: nuclear ITS2 and plastid rbcl.ResultsThe phylogenetic analysis using Neighborhood joining method revealed all the ITS2 tree topologies with higher genetic divergence than rbcl. All the rbcl tree topologies were monophyletic indicating sequence conservation. Though the concatenated ITS2 + rbcl trees had higher bootstrap support (> 98% except Solanum sp.) differences were observed because of the lack of available sequence deposition at species level. The proximate and nutritional profiling of the NIPS displayed superiority in terms of their nutritional profile and their potential application in phytopharmaceutical sector as nutritional supplements.Conclusion To our best knowledge this is the first study reporting the screening of five NIPS plant species of Karnataka for phylogeny and nutritional analysis. We also anticipate that if research towards the identification of NIPS species is accelerated, these nutritionally enhanced crops could be used as a safe and sustainable food in changing global climatic conditions.
... g/100 g) and reducing sugars (16.75-19.12 g/100 g) has been detected by Kookal and Thimmaiah (2018) in three cultivars of ripe banana fruit. The chemical composition of ripe banana fruit is presented in Table 1. ...
Article
Full-text available
Significance of fruits intake and reduction of non-communicable diseases
... The crude ber content was lower (0.72 g/100g) than previous studies which ranged from 0.92 to 2.79 g/100 g [21]; 1.58-2.42 g/100g in ripe banana cultivars Nendran, Njali poovan and Robusta [23]. This indicates that, it has to be supplemented with ber rich foods. ...
... This indicates that, it has to be supplemented with ber rich foods. Similarly, the protein content was comparable (4.03 g/100g) with an earlier study in ripe banana cultivars Nendran, Njali poovan and Robusta cultivated across Southern Indian districts ranging from 3.25 to 4.95 [23] and higher than the values reported for unripe Mchare cooking banana ranging from 0.61 to 1.75 g/100 g [21] respectively. The variation in the nutritional composition has been observed across different developmental stages of banana and also with change in climate and soil conditions. ...
... Contrarily, the moisture content (16.07 g/100g) was signi cantly lower than other reported ripe banana cultivars; 66.26-75.25 g/100g in the ripe fruits of South Indian banana cultivars [23]; 77.77 g/100g in case of biofertilized commercially cultivated ripe Grand Naine banana [24]. Our ndings reveal improved shelf life and keeping quality of Nanjangud Rasabale than other commercial cultivars of banana. ...
Preprint
Full-text available
Locally adapted native indigenous plant species (NIPS) could restore the crop diversity in sustainable agriculture. Here, we report the molecular identi cation and nutritional pro ling of some ve NIPS of Karnataka; Musa paradisiaca cv. Nanjangud rasabale, Piper betle L. cv. Mysore betel leaf, Jasminum grandi orum cv Mysore mallige, Solanum melongena L. cv. Udupi Mattu Gulla and S. melongena L. cv. Erangere badane of which the rst four are Geographical Indication (GI) tagged. The samples were procured, authenticated and sequenced using two standard DNA barcodes; nuclear ITS2 and plastid rbcl. The phylogenetic analysis using Neighborhood joining method revealed all the ITS2 tree topologies with higher genetic divergence than rbcl. All the rbcl tree topologies were monophyletic indicating sequence conservation. Though the concatenated ITS2 + rbcl trees had higher bootstrap support (> 98% except Solanum sp.) differences were observed because of the lack of available sequence deposition at species level. The proximate and nutritional pro ling of the NIPS displayed superiority in terms of their nutritional pro le and their potential application in phytopharmaceutical sector as nutritional supplements. We anticipate that if research towards the identi cation of NIPS species is accelerated, these nutritionally enhanced crops could be used as a safe and sustainable food in changing global climatic conditions.
... The crude ber content was lower (0.72 g/100g) than previous studies which ranged from 0.92 to 2.79 g/100 g [21]; 1.58-2.42 g/100g in ripe banana cultivars Nendran, Njali poovan and Robusta [23]. This indicates that, it has to be supplemented with ber rich foods. ...
... This indicates that, it has to be supplemented with ber rich foods. Similarly, the protein content was comparable (4.03 g/100g) with an earlier study in ripe banana cultivars Nendran, Njali poovan and Robusta cultivated across Southern Indian districts ranging from 3.25 to 4.95 [23] and higher than the values reported for unripe Mchare cooking banana ranging from 0.61 to 1.75 g/100 g [21] respectively. The variation in the nutritional composition has been observed across different developmental stages of banana and also with change in climate and soil conditions. ...
... Contrarily, the moisture content (16.07 g/100g) was signi cantly lower than other reported ripe banana cultivars; 66.26-75.25 g/100g in the ripe fruits of South Indian banana cultivars [23]; 77.77 g/100g in case of biofertilized commercially cultivated ripe Grand Naine banana [24]. Our ndings reveal improved shelf life and keeping quality of Nanjangud Rasabale than other commercial cultivars of banana. ...
Preprint
Full-text available
Locally adapted native indigenous plant species (NIPS) could restore the crop diversity in sustainable agriculture. Here, we report the molecular identification and nutritional profiling of some five NIPS of Karnataka; Musa paradisiaca cv. Nanjangud rasabale, Piper betle L. cv. Mysore betel leaf, Jasminum grandiflorum cv Mysore mallige, Solanum melongena L. cv. Udupi Mattu Gulla and S. melongena L. cv. Erangere badane of which the first four are Geographical Indication (GI) tagged. The samples were procured, authenticated and sequenced using two standard DNA barcodes; nuclear ITS2 and plastid rbcl . The phylogenetic analysis using Neighborhood joining method revealed all the ITS2 tree topologies with higher genetic divergence than rbcl . All the rbcl tree topologies were monophyletic indicating sequence conservation. Though the concatenated ITS2 + rbcl trees had higher bootstrap support (> 98% except Solanum sp. ) differences were observed because of the lack of available sequence deposition at species level. The proximate and nutritional profiling of the NIPS displayed superiority in terms of their nutritional profile and their potential application in phytopharmaceutical sector as nutritional supplements. We anticipate that if research towards the identification of NIPS species is accelerated, these nutritionally enhanced crops could be used as a safe and sustainable food in changing global climatic conditions.
... The analysis of mineral content (Ca, K, Na, Mg, P, Zn, Cd, Fe, Cu, Mn) was carried out according to Kookal and Thimmaiah (2018) [20]. A total of 0.5 g of the powdered sample was placed into a 50 mL conical flask, soaked in 10 mL of diacid mixture (concentrated HNO 3 and perchloric acid: 5:1, v:v) and kept overnight. ...
... The analysis of mineral content (Ca, K, Na, Mg, P, Zn, Cd, Fe, Cu, Mn) was carried out according to Kookal and Thimmaiah (2018) [20]. A total of 0.5 g of the powdered sample was placed into a 50 mL conical flask, soaked in 10 mL of diacid mixture (concentrated HNO 3 and perchloric acid: 5:1, v:v) and kept overnight. ...
... The mineral contents and their recommended daily allowances at nutrient reference values (NRVs), are presented in Table 2. Kookal and Thimmaiah (2018) [20] reported that, potassium (K), calcium (Ca), magnesium (Mg) and iron (Fe) are especially important because they are often deficient in different groups. In this study, we observe that the distribution of the total amount of minerals contained in the two fruits is slightly different (p < 0.05). ...
Article
Full-text available
To evaluate the potential health-promoting benefits of Berberis nummularia and B. atrocarpa fruits, the biochemical properties (nutrition component, mineral substance, organic acids), total phenolic and flavonoid content and antioxidant (DPPH, FRAP, ABTS and ORAC) capacity of ethanol extracts of B. nummularia and B. atrocarpa fruits wild-grown in Xinjiang were analyzed. The results indicated that there were no meaningful differences (p > 0.05) between the ash (1 ± 0.1 and 1 ± 0.0 g/100 g), fiber (16 ± 1.0 and 18 ± 1.4) and carbohydrate (57 ± 1.8 and 56 ± 1.8 g/100 g) content, respectively, in the dry fruits of B. nummularia and B. atrocarpa. The total fat (7 ± 0.4 and 5 ± 0.1 mg/100 g), soluble sugar (23 ± 0.6 and 12 ± 1.4 g/100 g), titratable acidity (18 ± 2.5% and 14 ± 1.3%) content, and energy value (330.86 and 314.41 kcal/100 g) of B. nummularia was significantly higher than that of B. atrocarpa fruits. Both species contain malic acid, acetic acid, tartaric acid, citric acid and fumaric acid, in which, malic acid is the dominant organic acid. The organic acid and mineral components of B. nummularia fruits were significantly higher than that of B. atrocarpa (p < 0.05). The total phenolic and flavonoid content of B. nummularia were 2 ± 0.0 mg GA/g DW and 2 ± 0.0 mg RE/g DW, respectively, which were significantly lower than the total phenolic and flavonoid content of B. atrocarpa (12 ± 0.1 mg GA/g DW and 9 ± 0.0 mg RE/g DW). The antioxidant capacity of B. nummularia (4 ± 0.1 mg Ascorbic acid/g DW for DPPH, 32 ± 0.1 mg Trolox/g DW for FRAP, 80 ± 3.0 mg Trolox/g DW for ABTS and 60 ± 3.6 mg Trolox/g for ORAC was significantly lower than that of B. atrocarpa (12 ± 0.0 mg Ascorbic acid/g DW for DPPH, 645 ± 1.1 mg Trolox/g DW for FRAP, 304 ± 3.0 mg Trolox/g DW for ABTS and 155 ± 2.8 mg Trolox/g for ORAC). B. atrocarpa fruits showed significantly higher antioxidant capacity than that of B. nummularia. The fruits of the two species can be used in food coloring and nutritional supplements, and consumption of the fruits can aid in weight control and reduce blood glucose or cholesterol.
... Iron, a mineral vital for the proper functioning of haemoglobin has the potential to alleviate micro-nutrient deficiency in human diet. This mineral represents up to 2 % of total weight at the ripening stage of the fruit which conforms to the present study (28,29). ...
... It is one of the largest produced and most consumed fruit in India. India ranks first in the cultivation of banana (Santhosh and Appachanda, 2018). Among the many varieties of this fruit is Nendran which is considered a supreme variety for its carbohydrate and micronutrient content (Siji and Nandini, 2017). ...
... The dried banana powder can be used for the preparation of value-added products. A study conducted by Santhosh and Appachanda (2018) suggested that the formulation of value-added products will be a valuable tool to avoid the exploitation of banana. Snacks, instant mix, dietary food, etc., can be prepared from dried banana powder. ...
... Banana consists of minerals like calcium, sodium, potassium, iron, and vitamins like B6 and vitamin C (Siji and Nandini, 2017). Hot air oven dried fresh ripe and unripe banana powder was studied for proximate composition and minerals to reveal biochemical changes during different post-harvest periods by Santhosh and Appachanda (2018). Studies suggest that micronutrient content varies according to different drying techniques. ...
Article
Full-text available
Musa paradisiaca (ripe Nendran) is the staple food of south India, especially Kerala. The present study analyzed the effect of different drying techniques, namely, freeze, spray and tray drying on the retention of nutrients especially micronutrients. Mineral content was determined by using Atomic absorption spectroscopy and Vitamin content was determined through High-performance liquid chromatography. This study aimed to analyze the availability of minerals and water-soluble vitamins in dried ripe banana powder. The micronutrient content of freeze-dried banana powder was observed to be with 486.92 ± 0.12 mg/100 g of potassium, 0.60 ± 0.005 mg/100 g of calcium, 3.10 ± 0.10 mg/100 g of sodium, 3.82 ± 0.02 mg/100 g of iron, 6.28 ± 0.04 mg/100 g of vitamin C and 0.606 ± 0.005 mg/100 g of vitamin B6. Along with micronutrient analysis, proximate, and various important physiochemical properties were also analyzed. The results showed that freeze-drying was the best technique to preserve nutrients present in ripe banana. Structure analysis of dried banana was done using scanning electron microscopy indicated that remarkable changes has occurred in both tray and spray dried banana when comparing to freeze dried banana. Data was analyzed by one-way ANOVA, found significantly differ at p < 0.05 with respect to drying methods.
... Iron, a mineral vital for the proper functioning of haemoglobin has the potential to alleviate micro-nutrient deficiency in human diet. This mineral represents up to 2 % of total weight at the ripening stage of the fruit which conforms to the present study (28,29). ...
Article
Full-text available
Biochemical and nutritional traits of 6 banana (Musa spp.) cultivars commercially cultivated in Kerala, belonging to different genomic groups viz. Pisang Lilin (AA), Grand Naine (ABB), Nendran (AAB), Karpooravalli (ABB), Njalipoovan (AB) and Yangambi (KM-5) (AAA) were evaluated. Biochemical and nutritional characters on variables such as titratable acidity (%), total soluble solids (oBrix) (TSS), total protein (g), total carbohydrates (g), total fat (%), total ash (%), crude fibre (%), vitamin C (mg), calcium (mg), potassium (mg), total phenols (mg) and total carotenoid (µg) content were laid out in a completely randomized design and subjected to one way ANOVA to determine the significance (p=.05). The cultivar Nendran (AAB) exhibited desirable biochemical and nutritional traits, particularly for titratable acidity (0.34%), TSS (23.90oB), total carbohydrates (37.51g/100g), total ash (14.89%) and crude fibre (0.90%) content. Yangambi (KM-5) (AAA) exhibited the highest values for major minerals of banana, especially calcium (168.90 mg/100g) and potassium (406.60 mg/100g). The current study reveals biochemical and nutritional variation among banana cultivars from different genomic groups, with similarities and differences overlapping even among banana cultivars from the same genomic group.