Images of three species of cetaceans found stranded along the Pacific coast of Nicaragua from 2014 to 2021, Case 10: adult Balaenoptera musculus (photo credit : website); Case 11: juvenile Balaenoptera edeni (photo credit : website); Case 12 adult Megaptera novaeangliae (photo credit : Eddy Aluvin); Case 13 juvenile M. novaeangliae) (photo credit : Damaris Obando)

Images of three species of cetaceans found stranded along the Pacific coast of Nicaragua from 2014 to 2021, Case 10: adult Balaenoptera musculus (photo credit : website); Case 11: juvenile Balaenoptera edeni (photo credit : website); Case 12 adult Megaptera novaeangliae (photo credit : Eddy Aluvin); Case 13 juvenile M. novaeangliae) (photo credit : Damaris Obando)

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Documenting marine mammal strandings provides important information needed to understand the occurrence and distribution patterns of species. Here, we report on strandings of cetaceans on the Pacific ( n = 11) and Caribbean ( n = 2) coasts of Nicaragua, documented opportunistically from 2014 to 2021. Strandings included three species of baleen whal...

Contexts in source publication

Context 1
... adult blue whale (Code 1) live-stranded on a beach in Nicaragua in November 2014 (Table 1; Fig. 4). The individual died after a rescue attempt by local communities. No body measurements were taken from the animal and there was insufficient data to identify the cause of ...
Context 2
... humpback whale strandings were reported at two different sites: one adult in the Natural Reserve of Padre Ramos (northern Nicaragua) in September 2017 (Code 3), and one juvenile/subadult along the coast of San Juan del Sur, southern Nicaragua in July 2019 (Code 3) (Table 1; Fig. 4). Images of the young individual revealed the presence of linear scars on its flank. No body measurements were taken of either animal, but measurements of the skeleton of the young individual showed the length to be 10 m. Based on the stranding dates of these animals and their overlap with the humpback whale's migratory season ...

Citations

... However, representation from much of Latin America is increasing, showing that LAJAM is slowly expanding its influence in the region over time. It is worth mentioning that the presence and distribution of cetaceans in some parts of Central America and the Caribbean is still poorly known (Palacios et al., 2011); as in-depth studies in these regions are being published, LAJAM could have a more active role in promoting effective dissemination of these studies to enhance management and conservation measures (Lucke et al., 2014;De Weerdt et al., 2021). ...
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We conducted a retrospective bibliometric analysis of the Latin American Journal of Aquatic Mammals (LAJAM), the scholarly publication of the Latin American Society of Specialists of Specialists in Aquatic Mammals (SOLAMAC) for the last 20 years. The goal was to describe the state of the research, trends, changes, and priorities to provide a deeper context for future studies on these taxa in Latin America. We analyzed 278 publications between 2002 – 2022 (there were no published issues between 2012 – 2014), by 688 authors and from 26 countries. Odontocetes were the best represented taxa, led by Tursiops truncatus, Pontoporia blainvillei, and Sotalia spp., followed by an otter (Pteronura brasiliensis) and a Mysticete (Megaptera novaengliae). Co-word analysis within publications reflected research focus on particular species (e.g., P. brasiliensis and T. truncatus), regions (e.g., southern Brazil and Peru) and topics (e.g., distribution, population, sexual dimorphism). Most of the studies were conducted in Brazil, Argentina, and Uruguay, whereas research from the Caribbean was limited in the sample. We found an increasing trend in the number of publications by females as first authors over the years, who also increased in the number of citations across the study. Several types of organizations were involved in the publications, dominated by academic institutions, mainly in Brazil. Many authors shifted institutions over the first half of the study, and publications from non-governmental organizations maintained an important role throughout the study. We identified eight clusters within the authorship network, where six belonged to Brazilian authors; however, cluster connectivity was mediated mainly by authors from countries like Brazil and Uruguay, changing across the years. Finally, the pattern and trends found here seem to adequately reflect the development of the field, in terms of efforts and collaborative networks in South America and Mexico during the last three decades.
... In Indian Ocean, few sighting of Dwarf Sperm Whales have been documented from the waters of North of the Seychelles to Oman and Sri Lanka, Thailand, Indonesia and Western Australia [2]. However, in recent times, stranded and dead bodies of Dwarf Sperm Whale were recorded from San Jose of Escuintla on 27 th February, 2013 [12]; Utila of Huonduras in Carribean Sea on 24 th June 2019 [11]; Colombia in Carribean Sea on March 2019 [13]; Nicaragua of Central America on December 2020 [14]. In the present study, this is the first stranding report [20]. ...
Article
Aims: Present study aims to highlight an accidental death of a male Dwarf Sperm Whale scientifically known as Kogia sima which found to be as Least Concern (LC) as per IUCN Red List data. Kogia sima represents important higher trophics of marine ecosystem which faced the several threats and conservation need in Gulf of Mannar, India. Study Design: The study undertaken during extensive coral reef monitoring survey was carried out in Gulf of Mannar under the CRAM Project of National Centre for Coastal Research (NCCR). The present report emphasize the Morphometric observation of the dead Kogia sima and try to find out possible cause of death by examining in situ investigation. Place and Duration of Study: The field study was taken in Vedalai Sea shore (N09°15.626’, E79°04.977’) under the Mandapam Union of Ramnathapuram District of Tamil Nadu. The male whale specimen was found on 5th May, 2019 lying dead on the sandy seashore. Methodology: Animal was photographed and morphological attributes were measured to identify the specimen. Several injuries have been highlighted in the paper which helps in investigating the cause of death. Results: The Dwarf Sperm Whale was infant and has mild damage on the mouth parts including scuff off skin from the body and severe blood clotting at major part of the right side near to pectoral fin. Death of this infant is not clear but it is assumed that the male infant has lost from his parents and came to the inshore area of Mandapam where it gets stuck with running boat or boulder rocks as this immature whale limits its diving capabilities. The necessary morphological characters and measures have been listed in Table 1. Conclusion: This unfortunate death clearly indicated that acute information on ecological behavior of Dwarf Sperm Whale is still under data collection stage in India and that previous conservation efforts in country must be reviewed in terms of role of local authorities, live stranded cetaceans and hunting or incidental killing which in future can build a road map for effective action plans to save this marine mammal.
... The adult dwarf sperm whale was a pregnant female with a fetus of less than 15 cm and still accompanied by a calf, suggesting that females of this species can give birth in consecutive years. The recorded fetus was in an early stage of development, similar to the fetus recorded in Nicaragua in December 2020 [32]. Fetuses from a later stage of development have been recorded in Colombia (~48 cm length) and Honduras (~65 cm length) during March and June, respectively [52,56]. ...
... The estimated length at birth for this species is about 3.4-4 m [28], suggesting that the recorded calf was a very young individual, likely born at the start of the summer. However, contrary to other baleen whales species, births of Bryde's whale are known to occur throughout the year [32,61,62]. In Nicaragua, for example, a 4 m calf stranded in December 2020 [32]. ...
... However, contrary to other baleen whales species, births of Bryde's whale are known to occur throughout the year [32,61,62]. In Nicaragua, for example, a 4 m calf stranded in December 2020 [32]. ...
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Cetacean strandings constitute one of the most important sources of information for studying cetacean diversity and obtaining basic biological data. The Guatemalan Pacific Ocean supports a high diversity of cetaceans, with at least 19 confirmed species records. However, little is known about cetacean strandings in Guatemala and their association with anthropogenic activities. We reviewed the occurrence of cetacean strandings on the Pacific coastline of Guatemala between 2007 and 2021. Stranding records were obtained from publications and citizen science such as sporadic reports from third parties, local and social media. In total, 39 stranding events from 12 species were recorded over the 15-year period examined. Stranded species belong to five families: Delphinidae, Kogiidae, Ziphiidae, Balaenopteridae and Eschrichtiidae. The striped dolphin (Stenella coeruleoalba, n = 6), bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus, n = 6), spinner dolphin (S. longirostris, n = 5), spotted dolphin (S. attenuata, n = 4), and humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliae, n = 4) were the most frequently stranded species. For three of the stranded species, the melon-headed whale (Peponocephala electra), Blainville's beaked whale (Mesoplodon densirostris), and gray whale (Eschrichtius robustus), these stranding records represent the first confirmed report of the species in Guatemalan waters. Although we could not determine the cause of stranding in most cases, at least 15% of stranded individuals presented marks or injuries that could be associated with anthropogenic activities, such as fisheries or vessel strikes. This study highlights the importance of stranding data and the need to create a national network to allow timely response to stranding events and to enable improved data collection protocols. A well-curated cetacean stranding database is crucial for scientific research as well as to implement management and conservation measures to protect these species in the region.