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(left) Original temperature records (blue) against the CMIP5 mean simulations from 138 GCMs. (right) The original temperature records are filtered off of their estimated NINO3.4 signature depicted in Figure 4, respectively 

(left) Original temperature records (blue) against the CMIP5 mean simulations from 138 GCMs. (right) The original temperature records are filtered off of their estimated NINO3.4 signature depicted in Figure 4, respectively 

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The period from 2000 to 2016 shows a modest warming trend that the advocates of the anthropogenic global warming theory have labeled as the "pause" or “hiatus.” These labels were chosen to indicate that the observed temperature standstill period results from an unforced internal fluctuation of the climate (e.g. by heat uptake of the deep ocean) tha...

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... Figure 5 shows on the left panels the six original temperature records (blue) from 2000 to 2017 against the CMIP5 mean simulations from 138 GCMs. On the right panels, Figure 5 shows the same temperature records after that the estimated NINO3.4 signature is detrended. ...
Context 2
... Figure 5 shows on the left panels the six original temperature records (blue) from 2000 to 2017 against the CMIP5 mean simulations from 138 GCMs. On the right panels, Figure 5 shows the same temperature records after that the estimated NINO3.4 signature is detrended. Although the 2015-2016 temperature peak gives the illusion of a late agreement between the observation and the modeled records, the divergence between the two record sets becomes quite evident once the ENSO signal is removed from the observation. ...
Context 3
... the 2015-2016 temperature peak gives the illusion of a late agreement between the observation and the modeled records, the divergence between the two record sets becomes quite evident once the ENSO signal is removed from the observation. The statistics of these trends are listed in Table 2 and in Figure 5B of Ref. [1]. ...

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... Some authors speculate that the most prominent accelerated warming period after LIA started roughly from 1900 onwards and could be related to a slight increase in solar irradiance. Scafetta et al. (2017) also claimed that peaks of warmer periods recorded during the 20 th century seem to be produced by astronomical forces. Although they do not exclude the IPCC anthropogenic global warming theory paradigm, these authors believe that global warming emerged from the combination of the natural oscillation of climate astronomically induced with some anthropogenic contribution. ...
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... Herein, we prefer SST to the global (land plus ocean) surface temperature record because (1) these two records are nearly identical before 1980 and (2) the gradual divergence observed since after 1980 appears dubious also because satellite-based temperature records significantly diverge from the surface-based ones after 2000 (Scafetta et al. 2004(Scafetta et al. , 2017a(Scafetta et al. , 2017b; http://www.clima te4yo u.com/). ...
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Chapter
Änderungen des Klimas, z. T. mit deutlich höheren Temperaturen als heute, durchziehen die gesamte Erdgeschichte. Da fragt man sich, ob nicht auch natürliche anstatt menschlicher Ursachen der Erwärmung in Frage kommen. Wir gehen dieser Frage nach und diskutieren den Zusammenhang zwischen CO2, Wasserdampf und Klima in der Erdgeschichte und heute, die Rolle der Ozeane und der Sonne, um mit der Klimasensitivität einen zentralen Begriff der Klimadiskussion aufzugreifen.
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The hiatus or temperature pause during the 21 st century has been the subject of numerous research studies with very different results and proposals. In this study, two simple climate models have been applied to test the causes of global temperature changes. The climate change factors have been shortwave (SW) radiation changes, changes in cloudiness and ENSO (El Niño Southern Oscillation) events assessed as the ONI (Oceanic Niño Index) values and anthropogenic climate drivers. The results show that a simple climate model assuming no positive water feedback follows the satellite temperature changes very well, the mean absolute error (MAE) during the period from 2001 to July 2019 being 0.073°C and 0.082°C in respect to GISTEMP. The IPCC's simple climate model shows for the same period errors of 0.191°C and 0.128°C respectively. The temperature in 2017-2018 was about 0.2°C above the average value in 2002-2014. The conclusion is that the pause was over after 2014 and the SW anomaly forcing was the major reason for this temperature increase. SW anomalies have had their greatest impacts on the global temperature during very strong (super) El Niño events in 1997-98 and 2015-16, providing a new perspective for ENSO events. A positive SW anomaly continued after 2015-16 which may explain the weak La Niña 2016 Original Research Article Ollila; PSIJ, 24(2): 1-20, 2020; Article no.PSIJ.55149 2 temperature impacts, and a negative SW anomaly after 1997-98 may have contributed two strong La Niña peaks 1998-2001. No cause and effect connection could be found between the SW radiation and temperature anomalies in Nino areas.