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Technical Report
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The purpose of this report is to summarize key research results from the Trans PULSE Project that may be useful in discussion, debates or policy creation related to human rights in multiple jurisdictions.

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O presente artigo busca estabelecer relações entre a situação de pessoas transgênero, sua socialização e representatividade no mercado comercial, para assim analisar o papel social do profissional do design enquanto colaborador na inclusão dessa parcela da sociedade. A conexão se deu a partir de análises de informações de diversos contextos, a cita...
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Concerns about bone health in transgender people using gender‐affirming hormonal treatment (HT) exist, but the fracture risk is not known. In this nationwide cohort study, we aimed to compare the fracture incidence in transgender people using long‐term HT with an age‐matched reference population. All adult transgender people who started HT before 2...
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Background The morphometric results after breast augmentations are generally understood to be clinically different between trans(gender) and cis(gender) women. The objective of this study was to establish these morphometric differences between the augmented breasts of trans and cis women and their implications for preoperative planning and expectat...
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Background Representing approximately 0.5% of the population, transgender (trans) persons in Canada depend on family physicians for both general and transition-related care. However, physicians receive little to no training on this patient population, and trans patients are often profoundly uncomfortable and may avoid health care. This study examin...

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... Although not all trans people pursue hormone or surgical transition, among those who do seek help but have yet to start transitioning, up to 27% might attempt suicide. 5 This figure drops to 18% after beginning transition, and might be as low as 1% once transition is completed. 5 Access to appropriate transition care is difficult for many trans individuals, and delays in treatment might contribute to these high suicide rates. ...
... 5 This figure drops to 18% after beginning transition, and might be as low as 1% once transition is completed. 5 Access to appropriate transition care is difficult for many trans individuals, and delays in treatment might contribute to these high suicide rates. 5 While treatment for trans people was previously relegated to specialized clinics in large cities, there has been a shift in the duty of responsibility toward community physicians. ...
... 5 Access to appropriate transition care is difficult for many trans individuals, and delays in treatment might contribute to these high suicide rates. 5 While treatment for trans people was previously relegated to specialized clinics in large cities, there has been a shift in the duty of responsibility toward community physicians. Using educational tools produced by organizations like Rainbow Health Ontario, 6 family physicians have access to the resources required to initiate hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and refer patients for surgery. ...
Article
Objective: To explore past experiences and describe the expectations of members of the trans community regarding the delivery of primary care by their family physicians. Design: Qualitative phenomenologic approach. Setting: Kingston, Ont, which has a population of approximately 123 000. Participants: A convenience sample of 11 individuals older than 18 years of age who self-identified as trans was recruited through community agencies and family medicine clinics. Methods: Semistructured interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim, and thematic analysis of transcripts was carried out by 2 independent researchers using NVivo. Main findings: Eleven interviews took place between September and November 2016; 4 individuals identified as trans men, 6 as trans women, and 1 as gender nonconforming. Themes identified included perceived physician knowledge of trans identities, patient self-advocacy, discrimination, positive spaces, and expectations of ideal care. The expected role of the family physician for trans patients includes hormone assessment and prescription and referrals for gender-affirming surgeries. Conclusion: The trans community has several physical and mental health needs that are not being met by the current health care system. Family physicians need to be empowered to provide services such as hormone initiation and gender-affirming surgery referrals. Although other specialists might have a role for some patients, most trans people expect care to be delivered by family physicians whenever possible.
... Trans populations experience high rates of physical and sexual violence, discrimination, stigma, poverty, homelessness and unemployment [58][59][60][61][62][63] and substance use may be a means to cope with these stressors [64,65]. ...
... Transgender people experience significant barriers to accessing and engaging in treatment programs [169,170]. Trans individuals may avoid healthcare and/or not disclose their gender to providers out of fear of discrimination, victimization, institutional biases and stigmatized beliefs among service providers [59,169,171,172]. Approximately half of transgender people with a substance use problem report being discouraged from seeking treatment because of expected stigma [169]. ...
Technical Report
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There is growing evidence of the effectiveness of trauma, gender, and sex (TGS) informed approaches in all areas of the substance use field, including prevention, education, harm reduction, treatment, policy, and research. Trauma-informed practice (TIP) is an important approach to improving substance use services, programming, policy and health promotion initiatives. Equally important is the integration of sex and gender based evidence into the substance use response system. Ultimately, creating gender transformative approaches to substance use can help to reduce gender and health inequities. This toolkit provides information about these approaches to share in staff training, program planning and evaluation, and to assist in organizational development. It also includes specific tools to support practice and policy change.
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The COVID-19 pandemic has increased the uptake of virtual and remote service delivery in the substance use field, which was previously uncommon. This swift uptake of virtual services provides an opportunity to improve service design to meet the diverse needs of women and gender-diverse people. Such services have the potential to better meet the needs of women and gender-diverse people by allowing for increased choice, control, and autonomy, enabling empowerment, facilitating greater considerations of power relations, violence, childcare responsibilities, and fostering greater inclusion of trans and non-binary people. This commentary aims to identify how virtual and remote delivery of substance use treatment and harm reduction services can be gender-responsive. We highlight the role gender transformative services play in meeting the unique needs of women and gender-diverse people who use drugs both during and after the COVID-19 pandemic. By using the unique window of opportunity COVID-19 has created to develop and deliver gender-transformative programs, we can help address the detrimental gaps in service accessibility and effectiveness that have persistently been experienced by women and gender-diverse people who use drugs.
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Purpose The goal of this study was to use speech resynthesis to investigate the effects of changes to individual acoustic features on speech-based gender perception of transmasculine voice samples following the onset of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) with exogenous testosterone. We hypothesized that mean fundamental frequency ( f o ) would have the largest effect on gender perception of any single acoustic feature. Method Mean f o , f o contour, and formant frequencies were calculated for three pairs of transmasculine speech samples before and after HRT onset. Sixteen speech samples with unique combinations of these acoustic features from each pair of speech samples were resynthesized. Twenty young adult listeners evaluated each synthesized speech sample for gender perception and synthetic quality. Two analyses of variance were used to investigate the effects of acoustic features on gender perception and synthetic quality. Results Of the three acoustic features, mean f o was the only single feature that had a statistically significant effect on gender perception. Differences between the speech samples before and after HRT onset that were not captured by changes in f o and formant frequencies also had a statistically significant effect on gender perception. Conclusion In these transmasculine voice samples, mean f o was the most important acoustic feature for voice masculinization as a result of HRT; future investigations in a larger number of transmasculine speakers and on the effects of behavioral therapy-based changes in concert with HRT is warranted.
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Chapter
Focusing on substantive representation, this chapter examines “acting for” discourses of LGBTQ representation through two questions. First, how do LGBQ MLAs and MPs constitute LGBTQ people and communities? The analysis reveals that they frame them through three figures: the figure of stigma, the figure of resilience, and the figure of cultural citizenship. Second, how do LGBQ legislators constitute the state in its relationship with LGBTQ people and communities? They deploy four “acting for” discourses of LGBTQ representation to express these exchanges: the discourses of human rights, homoprotectionism, homofederalism, and homonationalism.
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In this article, we draw on a recent review of the Canadian literature on poverty in lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, two-spirit, and other sexual and gender minority (LGBTQ2Sþ) communities to conceptualize social work interventions that may be used to address material inequities among these groups. Our literature review, which was based on a total of 39 works, revealed distinctive expressions of poverty among younger and older LGBTQ2Sþ groups, as well as racialized, newcomer, and Indigenous sexual and gender minorities. Drawing on these insights, together with theoretical frameworks grounded in intersectionality and relational poverty analysis, we conceptualize these expressions of material inequity as salient sites of social work practice and propose interventions targeting these manifestations of LGBTQ2Sþ poverty at various levels. Given the centrality of anti-poverty work as part of the social work profession's commitment to social justice, and the dearth of social work literature on LGBTQ2Sþ poverty, this article promises to make significant contributions to social work scholarship and professional practice.
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This article explores a quasi-diagnosis, “rapid-onset gender dysphoria”, which constructs the pathologized untimeliness of trans youth. I argue that rapid-onset is a concept with multiple, shifting meanings that encompass various dimensions of temporality. I show how constructions of rapid or fast time are used to call into question the claims of trans youth and the judgment of clinicians who treat them. The discourse of rapid, hasty, and etiologically suspect gender dysphoria assumes a view of gender as essential, fixed, and asocial, and of adolescence as a developmental stage of passivity, susceptibility, and risk. The study’s treatment of its research subjects as untimely obscures their varied, emergent, and dynamic experiences, I argue, which should not be read as signs of “incorrect” gender identity, but rather as indications of gender’s material performativity.
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What do umbrellas have to do with leisure research? Why do they need to be troubled? Throughout the course of this manuscript, we will unpack understandings of umbrella categories – specifically, gendered umbrella categories – and why it is relevant for leisure scholars to consider these categories within their research practices. Following a discussion of the complexity involved in projects of representation, leisure scholars will find a number of guiding principles and questions that highlight the importance of doing research in ways that are simultaneously aware of but also trouble the influence of taken for granted gendered umbrellas within research processes. By thoughtfully considering the way we as leisure researchers engage in research, we can open up space within our research for the legacies that do not fit neatly into binarized identity categorisations – as well as create more opportunities for doing leisure research in increasingly socially just ways.