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In deze bijdrage gaan we in op de vraag waar we in België staan met betrekking tot de verhouding publieke-private politie en of we hier al dan niet in de toekomst verandering in mogen verwachten. Terwijl voorgaande regeringen steeds een vrij terughoudende positie hadden aangehouden in verband met de inschakeling van de private veiligheidssector ten...

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... An immense ideological-based resistance -particular in the Walloon part of the country [76] prevented privatisation growth. In Belgium most outsourcing is enquired by the private sector itself, with a very limited part being outsourced by the public sector or by the Mayor [87]. This is due to the limited competences foreseen in the Acts and the restricted labour offer. ...
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The evolution from government to governance leading to multiple partnerships in policing and in pluralization of regular police functions is widespread in Europe. Although this trend is frequently described and analysed by Anglo-Saxon scholars, empiric research findings outside the United Kingdom are scarce. In this article we focus on the organisation of the Belgian regular police force and the passing on of particular police functions to other -as well private as public- partners and agencies. We analyse the situation after the major police reform in 1998, and situate the research findings in the broader context of changes in police systems in different countries. Police centralisation and decentralisation movements do influence outsourcing tendencies. We develop a theoretical overview of the issue of plural policing on the one hand and a theoretical framework to allocate reforms in police systems in different countries on the other. For Belgium we analyse the organisational and operational setting of the regular police, and public and private agents performing police tasks. The empirical research is based on an in-depth study of 25 years of security policy in Belgium (interviews with politicians) and an extended document analysis [ 86,87]. Concluding we discuss the specific place the regular police, called a ‘cannibal police force’ still takes within the security governance, leaving no place for outsourcing to private partners.