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Article
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Seven months after seeing The Men’s Program, a commonly used rape prevention program, 248 first-year college men responded to four open-ended questions concerning whether or not the program impacted their attitudes or behavior, particularly regarding alcohol related sexual assault. Two thirds of participants reported either attitude or behavior cha...

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... Additionally, different research was conducted in 2010 to analyze the evolution of male college students' perceptions and attitudes concerning bystander training. The study collected responses from 248 male first-year students seven months after they underwent prevention programming, and results indicated that "[t]wo thirds of participants reported either attitude or behavior change during the preceding academic year due to the program's effects or that the program reinforced their current beliefs […]" thereby suggesting a positive impact on the majority of trainees (Foubert, Tatum & Godin, 2010). ...
... They found that discussions of male-on-male rape have the potential to heighten men's empathy for both male and female rape victims, as the "use of a situation involving a man as a survivor can be effectively translated by skilled presenters to help men understand women's experiences" 2006. Four years later, Foubert, Tatum, and Godin (2010) found new evidence for the saliency of incorporating male-on-male rape experiences into prevention training-men's intent to rape declined, while empathy increased. Moreover, they found that the depiction of female survivors in men's programs may even increase male rape myth acceptance (2010). ...
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The endemic nature of sexual interpersonal violence demands a continual reexamination of preventative approaches. In South Central Iowa, scarce prevention resources must be distributed effectively and efficiently to maximize harm-reductive impact in rural areas. The needs assessment herein attempts to define and understand specific regional risk and protective factors to inform the prevention initiatives of a local crisis mitigation nonprofit. This assessment reveals important secondary school data and county-level statistics that justify targeted changes to current prevention work. A subsequent literature review examines pioneering scholarship in the field of sexual assault prevention theory over the past 15 years. The review chronicles new and promising integrations of social norms theory, the elaboration likelihood model, and the entertainment-education approach. It also reaffirms the effectiveness of bystander training, trauma-informed programming, and working within a social-ecological framework. Furthermore, the review evaluates the effectiveness of current institutional policy approaches, addresses the unique challenges of rural prevention work, and examines potential metrics for measuring program success.
... The findings of this study are important given the critical need for effective means of reducing rape within the U.S. Military to enhance unit cohesion and mission readiness (Campbell & Raja, 2005; Sadler et al., 2005; Suris & Lind, 2008). The program evaluated in this study has been shown to be effective with college fraternity men (), college athletes (Foubert & Perry, 2007), and first year students (Foubert, Tatum, & Godin, 2010). This study extends these findings to male soldiers in the army. ...
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Non-commissioned male officers in the U.S. Army stationed in Germany were trained to present a one-hour rape prevention workshop, The Men’s Program, to 237 enlisted male soldiers. A comparison group of 244 male soldiers received a briefing focused on reducing the individual’s risk for experiencing sexual assault, discussion of myths and facts about sexual assault, and how to avoid being accused of sexual assault. Participants in The Men’s Program experienced significant change in the predicted direction for bystander willingness to help, bystander efficacy, rape myth acceptance, likelihood of raping, and likelihood of committing sexual assault with low to medium effect sizes. Comparison group participants experienced no effect on these variables except for a significant decline in rape myth acceptance with a very low effect size. Between-group differences pointed to the efficacy of The Men’s Program. Implications of these results for rape prevention programming in the military are discussed. Note: Full article available by emailing John.Foubert@gmail.com.
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Rape prevention programmers and researchers have long struggled to select the most appropriate theoretical models to frame their work. Questions abound regarding appropriate standards of evidence for success of program interventions. The present article provides an alternative point of view to the one put forward by seven staff members from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (Tharp et al., 2011). Questions are posed for readers to consider regarding the appropriateness of the medical model for rape prevention programs, whether randomized control trials are the one and only gold standard, whether programs presented to groups should be evaluated at the group or individual level, whether subscribing to principles of prevention selected by the CDC for other disciplines translate well to rape prevention, what constitutes sufficient dosage, and what constitutes a rigorous research program studying an evolving rape prevention intervention.
Article
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The study conducted involved assessing students from a Southeastern public university during two academic years, after their participation in an all-male sexual assault peer education program. The study findings revealed that 79% of 184 college men reported attitude change, behavior change, or both. Furthermore, a multistage inductive analysis revealed that after seeing The Men's Program, men intervened to prevent rapes from happening. Participants also modified their behavior to avoid committing sexual assault when they or a potential partner were under the influence of alcohol. Implications for future research were discussed.