Table 3 - uploaded by Thomas Paris
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degree of concentration of admissions for American and European films

degree of concentration of admissions for American and European films

Source publication
Technical Report
Full-text available
Digital technology, the new forms of distribution and consumption of works, piracy, increasing saturation of screens, the arrival of new economic players - these are some of the elements that are transforming the cinema landscape. The European Parliament has launched a programme of experiments to transform these threats into opportunities, with a v...

Citations

... In a report for the EU, Paris (2014) has shown that the decrease in film theatres' audiences has reached its two lowest levels since the beginning of the century, the first in 2005 and the second in 2009, in spite of being a favorite way of spending spare time, especially among young people (De Bruyn and Cillessen, 2008). According to Paris (2014), this decreasing trend was not uniformly distributed, as some countries, such as Spain, have experienced a very severe decline in their cinema audiences (more than 46% in the period 2001-2013), while others have managed this trend more effectively. ...
... In a report for the EU, Paris (2014) has shown that the decrease in film theatres' audiences has reached its two lowest levels since the beginning of the century, the first in 2005 and the second in 2009, in spite of being a favorite way of spending spare time, especially among young people (De Bruyn and Cillessen, 2008). According to Paris (2014), this decreasing trend was not uniformly distributed, as some countries, such as Spain, have experienced a very severe decline in their cinema audiences (more than 46% in the period 2001-2013), while others have managed this trend more effectively. In Spain, this evolution was observed in the previous century too, with more than half of the film theaters being closed from the '60s to the early '90s (Cuadrado and Frasquet, 1999). ...
Article
Full-text available
Findings on European countries show non-uniform decreasing trends of film theatres’ audiences, the decline being more severe in Spain. This research presents a multifaceted perspective of Spanish filmgoers focused on motives for and barriers to film theatres attendance. Two comprehensive scales (motives, barriers) are proposed. First, motives and barriers are optimally scaled with principal components analysis (PCA); and, second, we identify segments of filmgoers with latent class modelling (LC). PCA recommended a five-factor solution for motives (education, film popularity, film quality, social interaction, and mood) and a seven-factor solution for barriers (film offerings, venue’s features, perception, preference and place, substitute activities, financial restrictions, recreation time disposability). LC analysis suggested three segments: mainstream filmgoers who watch films in multiplexes in shopping centers and in the center of the city; art-house filmgoers; and filmgoers who go to film theatres to watch films in original version. The socioeconomic and behavioral covariates complete the profile of the clusters, and the findings are consistent with the existing evidence on film audiences. Increasing cultural participation is the objective of many governments’ cultural policies and a more comprehensive understanding of film audiences can contribute to this.
Chapter
Drake explores the under-researched relationship between European film production and distribution, and examines a range of European policies designed to support film distribution, including digital and video-on-demand (VOoD)/Over-the-Top (OTT) distribution. Significant focus has been placed on understanding production in European cinema; however, there has been a lack of scholarly analysis of distribution. The article offers an analysis of MEDIA programme support for distribution, presenting data across participating countries, and highlights differential forms of subsidies for pan-European film distribution. It concludes with an analysis of two recent European initiatives to support cross-border digital distribution: Walk This Way (WtW) and The TIDE Experiment, and considers how alternative forms of distribution across national boundaries (‘co-distributions’) might reach wider audiences through a combination of traditional and digital distribution platforms.