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(a) Triglycerides and (b) Uric acid. C (Control) and HSF (High Sugar-Fat) groups. * statistical difference to p < 0.05.

(a) Triglycerides and (b) Uric acid. C (Control) and HSF (High Sugar-Fat) groups. * statistical difference to p < 0.05.

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Context 1
... HSF diet induced hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia; however, there was no difference for HOMA-IR between the groups (Figure 1). Triglycerides and uric acid ( Figure 2) were higher in the HSF group as well as adiponectin and leptin levels (Figure 3). ...
Context 2
... HSF diet induced hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia; however, there was no difference for HOMA-IR between the groups (Figure 1). Triglycerides and uric acid ( Figure 2) were higher in the HSF group as well as adiponectin and leptin levels (Figure 3). ...

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Obesity is a common issue across the globe, and recent studies have highlighted that deaths due to obesity have also increased rapidly. Obesity and the accompanying deficiency of iron nutrients in the diet has also become a nutritional disorder worldwide. This cross-sectional study was conducted district-wise across India in 2015-16, and in this pa...

Citations

... 30 At the same time, hyperinsulinemia stimulates and increases the leptin secretion by adipose tissue through the PI3K/Akt/ mTOR pathway, which can explain the increased leptin levels in the ROb animals that did not present increased body fat. 31 The metabolic responses to hyperinsulinemia and hyperleptinemia are well established in the literature. 22,26 Nevertheless, these conditions also promote responses in other target organs, such as the heart. ...
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Article
Background: As some individuals present resistance to obesity development, experiments have been trying to understand their susceptibility to cardiometabolic diseases. Objective: To evaluate if the cardiac remodeling was related to collagen protein expression change. Methods: Male Wistar rats were randomized into two experimental groups: control diet (CD, n=15) or high-fat diet (HFD, n=15) for 30 weeks. Rats fed with HFD were ranked based on their adiposity indexes and classified as obese (Ob, n = 8) or obesity-resistant (ROb, n = 6). Rats that failed to present the normal characteristic of the control group while fed with CD were excluded (Control, n = 8). Nutritional profile, comorbidities (dyslipidemia, hypertension, glucose metabolism, hyperleptinemia), cardiac remodeling, and collagen protein expression were evaluated. The groups were compared by One-Way ANOVA, together the Tukey post hoc test, with p<0.05 considered significant.Results: The Ob rats presented an increased adiposity index when compared to C and ROb. Both groups Ob and ROb presented increased low-density lipoprotein (LDL), insulin, homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA- IR) and systolic blood pressure (SBP), and low high-density lipoprotein (HDL) levels when compared to the control group. The levels of triglycerides, non-esterified fatty acid (NEFA), and leptin were lower in ROb as compared to Ob, but higher than the control group. The Ob and ROb groups presented cardiac remodeling, evidenced by echocardiographic and post-mortem analysis. The collagen protein expression did not differ among the groups. Conclusion: The ROb animals present cardiac remodeling that is not related to collagen type I and III protein expression change. (1) (PDF) Cardiac Remodeling in Obesity-Resistance Model is not Related to Collagen I and III Protein Expression. Available from: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/353256712_Cardiac_Remodeling_in_Obesity-Resistance_Model_is_not_Related_to_Collagen_I_and_III_Protein_Expression [accessed Jul 15 2021].