(a). The RGB orthomosaic overlaid on the 3D digital surface model (11 cm), with labeled example locations of the four primary target classes of interest. (b). Field photo (taken from photo icon on (a)) of emergent cattails (top half of photo), floating S. polyrhiza (Duckweed spp., yellowishgreen vegetation), floating N. odorata (large lilies) and floating EFB (darker green, small lilies sparsely distributed in S. polyrhiza mat).

(a). The RGB orthomosaic overlaid on the 3D digital surface model (11 cm), with labeled example locations of the four primary target classes of interest. (b). Field photo (taken from photo icon on (a)) of emergent cattails (top half of photo), floating S. polyrhiza (Duckweed spp., yellowishgreen vegetation), floating N. odorata (large lilies) and floating EFB (darker green, small lilies sparsely distributed in S. polyrhiza mat).

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Detecting newly established invasive plants is key to prevent further spread. Traditional field surveys are challenging and often insufficient to identify the presence and extent of invasions. This is particularly true for wetland ecosystems because of difficult access, and because floating and submergent plants may go undetected in the understory...

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Context 1
... observed stark differences in canopy height across the wetland (e.g., Floating vs. Emergent vegetation; Figure 2), so we sought to utilize the generated CHMs to inform classification algorithms in distinguishing different vegetation functional types. Photogrammetric CHMs, along with multispectral information, have been useful in classifying vegetation in other systems [7,8,26,27]. ...