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(a) Photomosaic of the detailed grid map for Section 2, which is nearly parallel to the fault strike. (b) Sketch of the fault zone elements. Fractured rocks are surrounded by splayed and merged fault cores. (c) Some gouge zones are displaced by normal faults. (d) Shear fabrics show different slip senses within a fault core. Note that (c) and (d) provide clear evidence of multiple slip events with opposite slip senses. (e and f) Secondary shear fractures indicate reverse slip sense of the main fault zone. This geometry is analogous to R-shear fractures developed along left-lateral strike-slip faults on map view.

(a) Photomosaic of the detailed grid map for Section 2, which is nearly parallel to the fault strike. (b) Sketch of the fault zone elements. Fractured rocks are surrounded by splayed and merged fault cores. (c) Some gouge zones are displaced by normal faults. (d) Shear fabrics show different slip senses within a fault core. Note that (c) and (d) provide clear evidence of multiple slip events with opposite slip senses. (e and f) Secondary shear fractures indicate reverse slip sense of the main fault zone. This geometry is analogous to R-shear fractures developed along left-lateral strike-slip faults on map view.

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The Korean peninsula has been considered as a tectonically safe region from earthquakes, because it is located in a stable margin of the Eurasian plate. However, more than 30 Quaternary faults have recently been reported from the southeastern part of the Korean peninsula. The studied fault zone is an N-S trending fault located in the northern exten...

Contexts in source publication

Context 1
... Section 2 (Figs. 3b, 5a). Although the fault zone generally strikes NE-SW, it shows complex geometries characterized by curved, splayed or merged patterns. Here, the fault core is mainly com- posed of lens-shaped fractured rocks surrounded by curved and relatively thin blackish gouge zones, which can be characterized as an anastomosing pattern (Fig. 5b). Some fractured rocks remain as lenses in the fault core due to shearing around the blocks during fault movement, and this kind of irregularly distributed fault rocks with large variety is the most common pattern in mature fault zones at outcrop scales ( Childs et al., 2009). Secondary faults and Kim and Park, 2006). (b) Simplified ...
Context 2
... fractures are developed in the hanging-wall and footwall damage zones, resulting from branching of the main slip surface into damage zones (Fig. ...
Context 3
... fault gouge indicating normal slip sense is partly displaced by secondary normal faults (Fig. 5c), and this suggests that the fault zone underwent multiple slip events even during a normal faulting stage. On the other hand, two sets of shear fabrics along some gouge zones demonstrate two opposite slip senses (Fig. 5d). The reverse slip sense is mostly supported by secondary shear fractures (R-fractures) in the fractured rocks and ...
Context 4
... fault gouge indicating normal slip sense is partly displaced by secondary normal faults (Fig. 5c), and this suggests that the fault zone underwent multiple slip events even during a normal faulting stage. On the other hand, two sets of shear fabrics along some gouge zones demonstrate two opposite slip senses (Fig. 5d). The reverse slip sense is mostly supported by secondary shear fractures (R-fractures) in the fractured rocks and damage zones ( Fig. 5e and f). This implies that the fault zone underwent slip inversion as well as multiple slip ...
Context 5
... this suggests that the fault zone underwent multiple slip events even during a normal faulting stage. On the other hand, two sets of shear fabrics along some gouge zones demonstrate two opposite slip senses (Fig. 5d). The reverse slip sense is mostly supported by secondary shear fractures (R-fractures) in the fractured rocks and damage zones ( Fig. 5e and f). This implies that the fault zone underwent slip inversion as well as multiple slip ...
Context 6
... example of gouge penetrating into the pre- existing one is a whitish fault gouge showing reverse slip within the reddish gouge in Sections 4 and 5 (Fig. 7). Some fault gouges were newly formed or activated within neighboring damage zones on the Sections 3, 6 and 7 (Figs. 6 and 9), and an anastomosing pat- tern of fault gouge is shown in Section 2 (Fig. ...

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