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a: Importance of Employment Status for Positive Affect (Gallup World Poll, Years 2014 to 2016, Weighted by Country; Confidence Intervals 95%; FT: Full-Time, PT: Part-Time) 

a: Importance of Employment Status for Positive Affect (Gallup World Poll, Years 2014 to 2016, Weighted by Country; Confidence Intervals 95%; FT: Full-Time, PT: Part-Time) 

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The Global Happiness Policy Report is produced by the Global Happiness Council and contains papers by expert working groups on happiness for good governance. Our chapter on work and well-being provides evidence and policy recommendations on best practices to promote happiness and well-being in the workplace. The first Global Happiness Policy Report...

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... Earlier studies establish that unemployment reduces subjective well-being in a significant way (Winkelmann and Winkelmann 1998;Kassenboehmer and Haisken-DeNew 2009;c.f., De Neve and Ward 2017;De Neve et al. 2018); and that this effect is large even in areas with high levels of unemployment (Clark et al. 2010;Helliwell and Huang 2014). There are scarring and scaring effects of unemployment, too, such that the insecurity from being unemployed in the past or the threat of being unemployed again in the future is large enough to affect subjective well-being (Clark et al. 2001(Clark et al. , 2018Knabe and Rätzel 2011). ...
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The study presents a subjective well-being approach to estimating the direct and indirect cost of unemployment. Using a combined dataset from the World Values Survey and the World Development Indicators, the study finds that the indirect cost of unemployment is about twice the size of the direct cost of unemployment. The overall estimate for the cost of unemployment turns out to be 1.5 income quintiles change in income. The finding of the study not only confirms a high price to pay for not working out the unemployment problem but also highlights the importance of public policy that seeks to guarantee employment and provide social protection for the unemployed.
... Although the influence of work on occupational health and safety has been long recognized (1), importance of work for well-being has been gaining scientific attention only recently (2)(3)(4)(5)(6). The impact of employee health on work has been traditionally examined through the lenses of physical and mental disabilities that limit chances for performing certain jobs (7)(8)(9). ...
... However, the nature of the work-life link is still unclear. Although recent research has extended our contextual knowledge about the possible effects on the job-life satisfaction relationship [for example the effects of: burnout (36,37), positive affect or negative affect (19,28), job importance (38), work-family conflict (19,28), work-life balance (39,40), workplace friendship (41,42), job insecurity (43), and even geographical remoteness (44)], a more comprehensive approach-as advocated also by Neve et al. (2) is needed. However, it is worth noting that a distinction between workplace well-being from general wellbeing has been recently recognized (33). ...
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... Although there has been an increase in mental health promotion and prevention programs globally, only 7% of such initiatives are workplace-based [34]. Indeed, the Global Happiness Policy Report (2018) calls for more research to expand the causal evidence base on work and wellbeing, and to evaluate workplace interventions promoting worker wellbeing [35]. In 2015, a Cochrane systematic review evaluated evidence on the effectiveness of interventions to prevent occupational stress in healthcare workers [36], but was restricted to studies measuring work-related stress and/or burnout by using validated tools. ...
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... In another study, Jan-Emmanuel De Neve, Christian Krekel and George Ward studied the drivers of employee satisfaction. 18 In order of importance, these drivers were: 1. Social relationships on the job. 2. Interesting job. ...
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... According to Morrison (2004), on-the job relationships can influence employees performance, and their productivity, and in turn, organizations indirectly benefit from these relationships. Several research (see among others De Neve, Krekel, Ward 2018;Carder 2019) show that social relationships on the job are, in order of importance, the first drivers of workers satisfaction. According to Chandrasekar (2011), it seems that "human to human interactions" and relations play a very central role in the overall job satisfaction more than money. ...
... While the latter could be perceived as coming from an antagonist relationship within which colleagues enter into competition, perhaps to stand out with the manager, the former is perceived as a more friendly relationship within which there are no rivalries. However, good cooperation between workers and their colleagues and the capacity of getting on well show a positive relationship with satisfaction with working conditions (De Neve, Krekel, Ward 2018;Carder 2019). Good interactions on the job provide social support (Cohen and Wills 1985): making people feel accepted within the workplace; providing various kind of information and the possibility of sharing network on the job. ...
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... Empirical research show that access to good quality housing, clean water, and sanitation are human rights and basic needs for healthy living, which are believed to be a central component in tackling poverty and contributing to well-being (Krieger and Higgins 2002;Marmot et al. 2008;Shaw 2004). Studies also show that human flourishing can be improved through enhanced access to healthcare and education (Marmot et al., 2008), adequate nutrition (Pernia & Quibria, 1999), financial security (Davis, 2016;Marmot & Wilkinson, 2009), job security (Marmot & Wilkinson, 2009), save and supportive neighbourhood and communities (Krieger & Higgins, 2002), and proper work-family balance (Bambra et al., 2014;de Neve, Krekel, & Ward, 2018;Fuß et al., 2008). ...
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