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| (a) Handheld electrospinning device marketed by Nanomedic Technologies Ltd. Israel, (b) electrospun fiber deposition, (c) clinical case report, treatment of second degree burn, modified from Nanomedic Technologies Ltd (2019).

| (a) Handheld electrospinning device marketed by Nanomedic Technologies Ltd. Israel, (b) electrospun fiber deposition, (c) clinical case report, treatment of second degree burn, modified from Nanomedic Technologies Ltd (2019).

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In situ tissue regeneration can be defined as the implantation of tissue-specific biomaterials (by itself or in combination with cells and/or biomolecules) at the tissue defect, taking advantage of the surrounding microenvironment as a natural bioreactor. Up to now, the structures used were based on particles or gels. However, with the technologica...

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... great efforts have been made to develop new portable electrospinning devices for the purposes of wound dressing and regeneration ( Xu et al., 2015;Haik et al., 2017). An example is the SkinCare (Figure 2), a portable wound care system developed by Nanomedic Technologies Ltd (2019) in Israel. Yan et al. (2019) reflects precisely the recent advances in portable electrospinning technology for the in situ delivery of personalized wound care and regenerative medicine. ...

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... The selection of biomaterials for in situ bioprinting is extremely important to ensure high printing resolution (<100 µm), fast in situ gelation, tissue regeneration and comparable mechanical properties between the printed architecture and the target tissue (Dias et al., 2020). As a result, a variety of bioprintable materials have been designed for in situ bioprinting onto different organs of interest, as shown in Figure 2. Examples of current in situ bioprinters with a focus on printers that show potential in minimally invasive repair (A) Traditional in situ bioprinter moving along x-y-z axes while depositing bioink onto chest wound according to a computer-aided design (CAD) model (B) Robotic arm-assisted bioprinter delivering bioink to cartilage injury from an advantageous position due to the high rotational freedom of the robot. ...
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... One potential 3DBP application is to print de novo tissue directly onto the specific wound site or defect in the body [291]. The structure of printed tissue may be tailored to fit into wound/defects with the help of medical imaging, allowing bioink to be accurately deposited inside the defects [292]. ...
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... The use of in situ-gelling Frontiers in Bioengineering and Biotechnology | www.frontiersin.org May 2022 | Volume 10 | Article 849831 hydrogels that can crosslink spontaneously upon injection (via physical interactions and/or click/click-like covalent bonding) is most common given that in situ gelation facilitates local injection of the hydrogel without the need for transplantation (Dias et al., 2020) (Figure 4). Also, in situ-gelling hydrogels can adapt the shape of the hydrogel directly for the defect site in the surgical room, particularly advantageous to treat irregularly shaped injury sites that may be difficult to fill accurately using an ex vivofabricated scaffold (Dias et al., 2020). ...
... May 2022 | Volume 10 | Article 849831 hydrogels that can crosslink spontaneously upon injection (via physical interactions and/or click/click-like covalent bonding) is most common given that in situ gelation facilitates local injection of the hydrogel without the need for transplantation (Dias et al., 2020) (Figure 4). Also, in situ-gelling hydrogels can adapt the shape of the hydrogel directly for the defect site in the surgical room, particularly advantageous to treat irregularly shaped injury sites that may be difficult to fill accurately using an ex vivofabricated scaffold (Dias et al., 2020). The key design criteria for injectable hydrogels useful for in situ tissue engineering were described in a recent review by Young et al.: 1) to maintain the viability and function of encapsulated cells; 2) to reproduce the target tissue morphology, including its mechanical profile and adhesion to surrounding tissues; and 3) to tune the degradation rate to ensure that complete tissue replacement can occur on a clinically-relevant timescale (Young et al., 2019). ...
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