Fig 5 - uploaded by David Radke
Content may be subject to copyright.
(a) CDF of pass length (distance traveled) for each type of completed pass. (b) Speed of completed passes for each type (distance traveled divided by total duration of the pass).

(a) CDF of pass length (distance traveled) for each type of completed pass. (b) Speed of completed passes for each type (distance traveled divided by total duration of the pass).

Source publication
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The implementation of a puck and player tracking (PPT) system in the National Hockey League (NHL) provides significant opportunities to utilize high-resolution spatial and temporal data for advanced hockey analytics. In this paper, we develop a technique to classify pass types in the tracking data as either Direct, 1-bank, or Rim passes. We also ad...

Contexts in source publication

Context 1
... 5a and 5b show Cumulative Distribution Functions (CDF) for pass distance (puck travel distance) and pass speed for completed passes, calculated by comparing the total puck travel distance with the duration of the pass. For example, half (0.5) of all completed passes had a distance of about 38 ft or less, shown in Figure 5a. Interestingly, while the distances for completed indirect passes (1-bank and Rim passes) are typically longer than completed Direct passes, we observe almost no distinct difference between these classes for pass speed (Figure 5b). ...
Context 2
... example, half (0.5) of all completed passes had a distance of about 38 ft or less, shown in Figure 5a. Interestingly, while the distances for completed indirect passes (1-bank and Rim passes) are typically longer than completed Direct passes, we observe almost no distinct difference between these classes for pass speed (Figure 5b). Thus, we hypothesize that players pass the puck harder towards the boards for indirect passes than they would for a Direct pass, to account for the expected energy loss from the boards. ...