Figure 1 - uploaded by Maarten Van Walstijn
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(a) Annotated potentiometer schematic symbol. (b) Separation of the potentiometer symbol into the inter-terminal resistances as used to model its behaviour. (c) Rotary potentiometer diagram with labelled terminals, and the rotating shaft highlighted and range of rotation indicated, the shaft shown at 0 • .

(a) Annotated potentiometer schematic symbol. (b) Separation of the potentiometer symbol into the inter-terminal resistances as used to model its behaviour. (c) Rotary potentiometer diagram with labelled terminals, and the rotating shaft highlighted and range of rotation indicated, the shaft shown at 0 • .

Source publication
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Physical circuit models have an inherent ability to simulate the behaviour of user controls as exhibited by, for example, potentiometers. Working to accurately model the user interface of musical circuits, this work provides potentiometer 'laws' that fit to the underlying characteristics of linear and logarithmic potentiometers. A strategy of ident...

Contexts in source publication

Context 1
... are a common component in musical circuits, used to provide a direct user interface. Some of the most common applications are for 'volume', 'tone', 'gain', etc. Illustrated in Figure 1, the potentiometer implements control over such quantities/phenomena by changing two resistances between three terminals relative to the position of its wiper which is actuated by the user. The focus of this work is on how those resistances change with respect to a change in position of the wiper, referred to as its 'law'. ...
Context 2
... section addresses 'ideal' potentiometer laws that are suitable for musical expression, but may not correspond exactly with how a physical potentiometer behaves electronically. An ideal potentiometer law is defined having a maximum total resistance RT which is the sum of resistance between terminals 1 and 3 as illustrated in Figure 1. Each terminal and wiper are assumed to be perfect conductors i.e. have no resistance. ...
Context 3
... for both potentiometer laws in Figure 10 are the measured and identified amplitude responses of the Big Muff Pi tone stack. This serves to provide one way of attributing error but also as a source of validation. ...
Context 4
... a form of validation, the fit to measurements demonstrated in Figure 10 is accurate to within 1 dB across all measurements, indicating that the tone stack filtering effect is captured over the the full wiper range. ...