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Word Sketch results for the term induction 

Word Sketch results for the term induction 

Source publication
Article
Full-text available
One of the key issues faced by translators and translation students of specialised texts is finding the equivalents of terms in L2 of the field in question. A greater challenge, however, is the formation of the textual environment with the appropriate collocations (adjectives, nouns, verbs) for those terms in the language for special purposes (LSP)...

Contexts in source publication

Context 1
... shown above, WebBootCat cannot translate terms or locate equivalents; the user needs to know what the equivalent of a term is in order to search for it in the corpus and retrieve examples of the word node with the help of the concordancer. One may ask the following: "How useful is this tool if we have to know what we are searching for?" On the one hand, the terms to be selected and translated into the language of the corpus to be compiled can be the easiest to locate on an online dictionary or the Web. For the said corpus I have entered the terms "acute lymphoblastic leukaemia", "red blood cells", "white blood cells", "bone marrow", "petechiae", "platelets" and "chemotherapy". These terms were identified looking at only a few articles regarding childhood leukaemia on the Internet. As displayed in Figure 3, only eight terms were needed with WebBootCat to generate a corpus of hundreds of thousands of words, where other terms are "hiding" and are discovered through incidental learning. For example, in the ad hoc medical corpus created with WebBootCat, we searched the term "immature cells" and the concordancer generated, among others, the following ...
Context 2
... stated on the site: "A word sketch is a one-page summary of the word's grammatical and collocational behaviour. It shows the words' collocates categorised by grammatical relations such as words that serve as an object of the verb, words that serve as a subject of the verb, words that modify the word etc." 3 It often happens that the translator finds an equivalent term in L2 but does not know how to fit it in a prepositional structure; which verb follows, which adjective precedes; to put it differently, which words surround the term. The text material found in corpora is a very appropriate source for context information, and the Word Sketch negates the need for reading thousands of concordance lines to draw conclusions. All the information is displayed in a compact format, as shown in Figure 3, saving the user valuable time. ...
Context 3
... shown above, WebBootCat cannot translate terms or locate equivalents; the user needs to know what the equivalent of a term is in order to search for it in the corpus and retrieve examples of the word node with the help of the concordancer. One may ask the following: "How useful is this tool if we have to know what we are searching for?" On the one hand, the terms to be selected and translated into the language of the corpus to be compiled can be the easiest to locate on an online dictionary or the Web. For the said corpus I have entered the terms "acute lymphoblastic leukaemia", "red blood cells", "white blood cells", "bone marrow", "petechiae", "platelets" and "chemotherapy". These terms were identified looking at only a few articles regarding childhood leukaemia on the Internet. As displayed in Figure 3, only eight terms were needed with WebBootCat to generate a corpus of hundreds of thousands of words, where other terms are "hiding" and are discovered through incidental learning. For example, in the ad hoc medical corpus created with WebBootCat, we searched the term "immature cells" and the concordancer generated, among others, the following ...
Context 4
... stated on the site: "A word sketch is a one-page summary of the word's grammatical and collocational behaviour. It shows the words' collocates categorised by grammatical relations such as words that serve as an object of the verb, words that serve as a subject of the verb, words that modify the word etc." 3 It often happens that the translator finds an equivalent term in L2 but does not know how to fit it in a prepositional structure; which verb follows, which adjective precedes; to put it differently, which words surround the term. The text material found in corpora is a very appropriate source for context information, and the Word Sketch negates the need for reading thousands of concordance lines to draw conclusions. All the information is displayed in a compact format, as shown in Figure 3, saving the user valuable time. ...

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Citations

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Corpus technologies (corpora of English and Ukrainian texts and tools for their processing) represent modern specialized discourse and facilitate searching for and comparing different units of translation, which makes them a useful tool for both practicing and trainee translators. The purpose of this article is to determine the role and place of corpus technologies in teaching specialized translation on the example of the oil and gas industry. Comparative and parallel text corpora are characterized. The paper reveals methods of applying mono- and bilingual comparative and parallel corpora and corpus managers for acquiring knowledge about genre-stylistic features of texts; developing skills to distinguish a term and determine its collocation profile and semantic preference; analyze translation techniques; translate collocations, complex noun constructions, verbal phrases, and abbreviations. Examples of relevant exercises and tasks that should be performed at the translation training stage are given. Further research should be aimed at integrating corpus-based tasks into the translation practice stage involving the implementation of a translation project.
Chapter
In view of recent developments in applied linguistics and translation studies, this paper argues that translation pedagogy is now a broad and burgeoning area of transdisciplinary research and practice whose goal is to address questions concerning teaching methods, testing techniques and curriculum planning in language teaching as well as translator training. Starting from this inclusive stance, the paper firstly proposes to redraw James S. Holmes’s outline of applied translation studies. Secondly, it provides a critical analytical overview of corpus use in pedagogical translation at the advanced levels of linguistic competence in language B, as described in the Companion Volume to the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) (Council of Europe 2020). Thirdly, it overviews exemplary corpus use in translator training. These two sub-domains of applied corpus-based translation studies are viewed through the lens of two major competence models that have been elaborated in Europe in recent years. So, corpus use in language teaching is illustrated in the light of the new descriptors of the CEFR (Council of Europe 2020). Corpus use in translator training is illustrated in the light of the new European Master’s in Translation (EMT) competence framework for 2018–2024 (Toudic and Krause 2017). After an introduction that outlines the background to the study, our paper critically reviews a sample of novel corpus-based teaching methods, and reveals commonalities and differences as to the place and role of corpora in 21st century translation pedagogy. The paper concludes by offering some recommendations for future research and practice.
Experiment Findings
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Final results of the research presented in the paper "The Web as a Corpus and for building Corpora in the teaching of Specialised Translation: the example of texts in Healthcare". The data were collected using methodological triangulation, that is a combination of qualitative (participant observation, field notes and interview based on a semi-structured questionnaire) and quantitative (literature and course catalogues review) research methods.