Visualization of spatially resolved deconstruction of cellulose during hydrolysis. A. IR spectrum of C. aegagropila cellulose and their diagnostic markers. B. Intensity heat map of glycosidic bond shows the cellulose "particle" shrinks and thins from outer to inner regions (imaged region in Figure 2). C, D. Tracking the location-specific kinetics of cellulose depletion and impact of hydrolysis on molecular ordering in cellulose.

Visualization of spatially resolved deconstruction of cellulose during hydrolysis. A. IR spectrum of C. aegagropila cellulose and their diagnostic markers. B. Intensity heat map of glycosidic bond shows the cellulose "particle" shrinks and thins from outer to inner regions (imaged region in Figure 2). C, D. Tracking the location-specific kinetics of cellulose depletion and impact of hydrolysis on molecular ordering in cellulose.

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Synchrotron infrared hyperspectral microscopy is a label-free and non-invasive technique well suited for imaging of chemical events in situ. It can track the spatial and temporal distributions of molecules of interests in a specimen in its native state by the molecule's characteristic vibrational modes. Despite tremendous progress made in recent ye...

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Context 1
... water was injected into the upper channel to feed the capillaries in the humidity control chamber at a flow rate of 0.2 L/min to maintain a relative atmospheric humidity of ~85% at 37 °C. As a polymer of glucose, cellulose features C-O bonds at five of the six carbons of the glucose residues that contribute to absorption peaks ( Figure 3A) prominently at 1034 cm -1 , 1060 cm -1 , and 1160 cm -1 , corresponding to C-O stretches at the sixth (C6) and third carbon (C3) of the glucose residues, and the glycosidic bond (C-O-C) of the polysaccharide. We documented spatially heterogeneous and temporal changes in the abundance ( Figure 3B, 3C) and molecular ordering ( Figure 3D) of cellulose during enzymatic hydrolysis over 12 hours. ...
Context 2
... a polymer of glucose, cellulose features C-O bonds at five of the six carbons of the glucose residues that contribute to absorption peaks ( Figure 3A) prominently at 1034 cm -1 , 1060 cm -1 , and 1160 cm -1 , corresponding to C-O stretches at the sixth (C6) and third carbon (C3) of the glucose residues, and the glycosidic bond (C-O-C) of the polysaccharide. We documented spatially heterogeneous and temporal changes in the abundance ( Figure 3B, 3C) and molecular ordering ( Figure 3D) of cellulose during enzymatic hydrolysis over 12 hours. We observed a decline in absorbance intensity of the 1160 cm -1 glycosidic bond peak, and wavenumber shifts in the prominent 1034 cm -1 , 1060 cm -1 , and 1160 cm -1 peaks. ...
Context 3
... a polymer of glucose, cellulose features C-O bonds at five of the six carbons of the glucose residues that contribute to absorption peaks ( Figure 3A) prominently at 1034 cm -1 , 1060 cm -1 , and 1160 cm -1 , corresponding to C-O stretches at the sixth (C6) and third carbon (C3) of the glucose residues, and the glycosidic bond (C-O-C) of the polysaccharide. We documented spatially heterogeneous and temporal changes in the abundance ( Figure 3B, 3C) and molecular ordering ( Figure 3D) of cellulose during enzymatic hydrolysis over 12 hours. We observed a decline in absorbance intensity of the 1160 cm -1 glycosidic bond peak, and wavenumber shifts in the prominent 1034 cm -1 , 1060 cm -1 , and 1160 cm -1 peaks. ...