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V4 countries total primary energy supply (2017). Source: own compilation based on European Commission (2019b).

V4 countries total primary energy supply (2017). Source: own compilation based on European Commission (2019b).

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Article
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The energy policy of The Visegrad Group states (V4: Poland, Czechia, Slovakia and Hungary) is being challenged by, among many other factors, dependence on the import of energy resources, increasing environmental pressure , insufficient and disappointing process of energy policy Europeanisation. Therefore, all V4 states are seeking new energy policy...

Contexts in source publication

Context 1
... diversification strategies of the V4 countries attempt to change both the energy mix (increasing the share of nuclear fuel, renewables and natural gas) and the group of supplier countries. The energy mixes of the respective V4 states are different, but share some important characteristics (Fig. ...
Context 2
... diversification strategies of the V4 countries attempt to change both the energy mix (increasing the share of nuclear fuel, renewables and natural gas) and the group of supplier countries. The energy mixes of the respective V4 states are different, but share some important characteristics (Fig. ...

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... Kutyła 2016). In some texts, they remain on the margin of the general description of gas markets in the discussed countries (Dyduch and Skorek 2020;Kłaczyński 2018;Osička et al. 2018;Ruszel and Szurlej 2016). The core of the source literature is of a narrower scope. ...
... In 2020, Agata Łoskot-Strachota pointed to the tendency "to abandon subsidizing gas investments from EU funds" (Łoskot-Strachota 2020). However, an opposite view can also be found in the literature (Dyduch and Skorek 2020). In order to increase the EU funds allocated for the construction of UGSF, the Visegrad Group needs to cooperate appropriately in the scope of the energy policy in EU structures. ...
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