Two installments from Frank King's Gasoline Alley, 24 August 1930 (left) and 24 May 1931 (right), 2015. © Estate of Frank King.

Two installments from Frank King's Gasoline Alley, 24 August 1930 (left) and 24 May 1931 (right), 2015. © Estate of Frank King.

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This article presents a discussion about some of the main theoretical approaches of the assemblage of panels on the page and the double page, arguing that the correspondences between the images on the page are not fundamentally linear. On the contrary, comics foster readings that can be holistic, multidirectional and multilinear. Moreover, the corr...

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... As the eye can wander on the map, building imaginary routes so it can also do so on the comics page, violating the 'Z-Path' (left to right, top to bottom) [5,11] in favour of erratic paths [17] as it happens for infographics [12]. In fact, comics, through the multi-vectorial (or 'multiorder') narrative skills typical of its page layout, overcomes the sequentiality to open up also to synchronic spatial and temporal narratives [6]. Furthermore, comics and maps can work together to create new paths within a space that is both narrative and geographic [16]. ...
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Although both so-called ‘data comics’ and ‘comics geographies’ fields have been defined as emerging, there is a lack of structured and multidisciplinary studies that deal with comics’ diagrammatic nature. The parallelism between comics and diagrams, dear to many comics makers and some scholars, is more than a mere graphic suggestion or similarity. Unlike the written word and other visual art forms, comics, through the multi-vectorial narrative skills typical of the page layout, overcomes alphabetic writing’s linearity to open up to synchronic and parallel space-time narratives. Comics also favours ellipses, spatial dislocations, and micro-narrations in larger narratives more naturally than in other artistic and narrative forms. Moreover, comics make possible, differently than in literature, a strong involvement of the reader in constructing alternative paths. The grid is the element that brings comics back under the category of diagrams through its ability to temporalize space and create hierarchies and relationships between the parts (panels). Through some examples, this paper offers an introductive overview of the many possibilities offered by a diagrammatic reading of comics, demonstrating how even the most straightforward grid configurations can convey complex concepts.
... The use of (or absence of) panels can also call attention to new ways of reading the printed page (Cabero, 2019). Cabero argues for multidirectional readings, where the traditional reading order in English is altered (such as reading right to left, top to bottom or in circular patterns) and multilinear readings, where two or more simultaneous stories take place on a page. ...
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... Developing McCloud's observation further, Groensteen (2007: 6) reads comics as a system that depends on 'the simultaneous mobilisation of the entirety of codes (visual and discursive) that constitute it'. Time is held spatially on the page(s) of the comic, inviting readers to think beyond the linear confines of conventional filmic or novelistic forms and instead to read for the assemblage of relations that connect multiple temporal moments together, both spatially and simultaneously (see del Rey Cabero, 2019). ...
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... When creating a comic, you can think of the big idea or scene and then break that down into components ( (Cabero, 2019;Groensteen, 2007). 8. Onomatopoeia and word depiction/lettering. ...
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... This activity also aligns somewhat with Marino and Crocco's (2012) then and now activity. Finally, the nonlinear potential of the comics form (Cabero, 2019;Miodrag, 2013) can also be utilized in these assignments, by allowing students to think outside of strict sequence and linear causation in regard to place. Below, I offer some examples of assignments which utilize the ideas above. ...
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This chapter offers a number of comic creation assignments. Creation is the highest level of Bloom’s revised taxonomy (Krathwohl, 2002). Students utilize the features of the comics medium, such as panel size and sequencing to name a few, to convey ideas related to citizenship in comic form.
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The first chapter of the book serves as the introduction where various strands of thought are weaved together to show why the reading and creating of comics is a good fit for teaching citizenship in the present age. The first chapter forms the foundation and inspiration for all the activities in the later chapters.
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This chapter offers assignments which center on reading comics. These assignments are meant to help students read comics in light of ideas and concepts related to citizenship and the social studies.