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| Two examples of the Young Children's Views of Older People (YCVOP) scale. The child has to slide a handle and point the finger at a position that best describes her/his view of older people on the line between two opposed adjectives, each illustrated by a cartoon.

| Two examples of the Young Children's Views of Older People (YCVOP) scale. The child has to slide a handle and point the finger at a position that best describes her/his view of older people on the line between two opposed adjectives, each illustrated by a cartoon.

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Ageist attitudes have been discovered in children as early as 3 years. However, so far very few studies, especially during the last decade, have examined age-related stereotypes in preschool children. Available questionnaires adapted to this population are scarce. Our study was designed to probe old age-related views in 3- to 6-year-old children (n...

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Context 1
... method was inspired by Caspi's work (Caspi, 1984). In the YCVOP, color drawings representing the same old man with different expressions were printed on 10.4 by 14.0 cm (4.1 × 5.6 in) plastic cards and each of them was placed on Velcro TM tape to the extremities of a horizontal plastic line representing the VAS, along which the child had to move a finger-shaped handle/slider (Figure 1). This system is inspired by medical scales used to assess pain (emotional and personal experience) in young children, even as young as 3 years ( Cohen et al., 2008). ...
Context 2
... bipolar pairs are presented below in the order they were administered. When the 95% confidence interval does not overlap 0, the result for this adjective pair is significantly (p < 0.05) different from 0. Each bipolar pair of adjectives (given in French in the original version) attributed to older people by children was illustrated by a dedicated cartoon (for examples, see Figure 1). ...

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... Old AGS are acquired early in life (Flamion et al., 2020), are nurtured throughout the lifetime in an environment that tends toward ageism (Naegele et al., 2018), are easily triggered by obvious features (Mason et al., 2006), and function via both explicit and implicit pathways (Hess et al., 2003), making them seemingly susceptible to relatively subtle experimental manipulation. ...
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... Elderly people can play important roles in children's lives. Health professionals can help ensure that these benefits are maximized by helping children understand the aging process and all the changes that happen physiologically as psychologically 10 . ...
... Adults can play important roles in children´s lives where contributions like wisdom and health experience can be of inestimable benefit to the children 22,23 . Pediatric care can help ensure that these benefits are maximized by helping children understand the normal changes of aging 10,24 . ...
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... Our study directs the attention toward the stability vs. changeability of age stereotypes. Since age is a primary dimension of interpersonal categorization (North and Fiske, 2012) and ageism is prevalent in Western societies (Hummert, 2011), it is not surprising that negative old age stereotypes already exist in preschool children and then stabilize across middle childhood and adolescence (Davidson et al., 2008;Flamion et al., 2020). Nevertheless, age stereotypes are changeable, as the present study underlines (see also Meshel and McGlynn, 2004;Gamliel and Gabay, 2014). ...
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DiGeSt 9(1) General Issue - Ageivism Roundtable