Figure 1 - uploaded by Lochner Marais
Content may be subject to copyright.
Trajectory of environmentally responsible design [33].

Trajectory of environmentally responsible design [33].

Source publication
Article
Full-text available
Informal settlement upgrading is commonly practised worldwide, but often in technical ways, paying little attention to the physical environment. Regenerative development provides an ecological response and emphasises human development concerns. In this paper, we adopt a social constructivist approach to investigating the meaning of construction pro...

Context in source publication

Context 1
... main aims of regenerative development are to revitalise, restore and renew materials, rather than to discard, and to create and improve ecosystems [37]. Regenerative development requires a design that is environmentally responsible [37] (see Figure 1). Figure 1 shows Reed's idea of a continuum, ranging from a degenerating system (conventional practice and green) to one that is sustainable, restorative and ultimately regenerative. ...

Citations

... Modern eco-efficient buildings can merge natural resources with reused and recycled materials. According to Venter et al. (2019), the combination of eco-materials with different waste materials produces post-natural buildings. This practice was defined by Scoggin (2020) as the utilization of natural raw materials with common materials such as tyres, bottles, mud, straw, manure and water to create ecologically-friendly shack-replacement houses. ...
Article
Full-text available
Versatile, wood has been used by mankind in furniture, instruments, utensils and construction. About timber buildings, this critical review discusses their valuable and sustainable features that label their multiple options. Numerous contributions were compiled from the author's collection and prospection in relevant databases. Construction techniques were featured, vocations were identified and production systems were remarked to detail wood-based resources and residues. Discussions and suggestions were raised as promoting strategies. Secular buildings prove the convenience of wood materials in construction, since they have decent levels in sustainability, durability, stability, value added, aesthetics, strength and weight. Timber construction enables artisanal to industrial productions and traditional to contemporary techniques with different materials, sizes and architectural styles. Global barriers are marked by obscurities about logging and illegal deforestation, and deficiencies in the regulations of native species. The utilization of sustainably sourced wood, sylviculture as a viable social-economic driving force and several advantages of timber construction are positive reasons. Actions were proposed to drive policy and multiply timber buildings, since they form a promising segment for emerging bioeconomies of innovative nations. Changes in wood consumption to enhance sylviculture combined with the waste reutilization should intensify the sustainability of timber construction and establish industrial synergies. **For FULL VERSION of this paper, please contact me...
Chapter
This chapter examines a series of projects that typify some current trends in the design of the built environment that address the social and economic crisis described in Chap. 1. In all the cases discussed there is a common theme that climate change issues can be dealt with through economic growth and technological development, of which the design of new urban areas and buildings is a part. Designs, from various countries, that are both large and complex are examined, including a suggestion for off-planet living. All are inspected for their contribution to minimising environmental impact. What is revealed is that the designs fall into one of two types. The first are those that solve problems that do not exist and the second are those that tend to make existing problems worse. Exacerbating existing problems is an aspect of increasing complexity, which in turn has been linked to societal collapse. Although designers may see themselves as agents of ensuring a more environmentally aware and viable solution for everyone, this chapter challenges whether some of the results achieve this.
Chapter
Both international and South African researches on informal settlement upgrading indicate that a possible ‘direct’ relationship with the health of residents is connected more to neighbourhood access to social amenities than to physical housing conditions. Despite South African government attempts to align the National Development Plan (NDP) with Agenda 2030, and policy references to health and social amenities as integral to socially and economically integrated communities, the Department of Housing’s programme is remarkably silent in respect of health outcomes. This chapter assesses the knowledge gap on health outcomes in upgraded informal settlements, within the wider context of Agenda 2030 and SDGs 3, 6, and 11. Through a survey, in-depth qualitative interviews and focus group discussions in an upgraded informal settlement, it contributes new evidence from analysis of households’ perceptions of health. It then makes policy recommendations such as ensuring improved integration of health services and boosting sanitation and housing in upgrading programmes in order to achieve both a more preventive approach to health locally and to contribute more effectively to achieving the SDGs on health, water and sanitation, and housing.
Article
Full-text available
Investigations of the quality and satisfaction of urban life in informal settlements remain largely overlooked in the existing literature especially in developing countries. About one-fifth of Afghanistan population is living in urban areas, however, the trend is changing very fast and the country observes now one of the highest urbanization rates in the world. Two principal reasons for rapid urbanization are the return of Afghan immigrants from other countries after a period of relative peace and domestic rural-urban migration. Kabul, the capital city, is the most attractive destination for all immigrants. Around 80 percent of the population of the city lives in informal and illegal settlements. To investigate the perceived quality of life (QoL) of citizens living in these settlements, a survey was administered to 400 households in informal areas of Kabul. Statistical treatment of the results, including regression and factor analysis, showed a general dissatisfaction with the quality of life components related to transportation, leisure, and governance. Material deprivation regarding basic services (water, energy, etc.) was also widespread. On the other hand, less tangible components such as sense of community and family scored higher. Still, informal settlements constitute a fundamental part of Kabul and authorities should seek to improve quality of life especially in what concerns the provision of urban public goods. The findings of this study attempt to provide basic results for managers, planners and urban policymakers to facilitate a reasonable evaluation of the current state of the city in order to take action in addressing planning problems and achieving urban sustainability.