Total emission rates (ng * h −1 * vole −1 ) for the compounds of interest, grouped by treatment. Treatments: control (C), Handling (H), and Predator (P). Components in panel a, b and c are grouped by

Total emission rates (ng * h −1 * vole −1 ) for the compounds of interest, grouped by treatment. Treatments: control (C), Handling (H), and Predator (P). Components in panel a, b and c are grouped by

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Chemical communication plays an important role in mammalian life history decisions. Animals send and receive information based on body odour secretions. Odour cues provide important social information on identity, kinship, sex, group membership or genetic quality. Recent findings show, that rodents alarm their conspecifics with danger-dependent bod...

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... 999 permutations, P = 0.001) for all three pairwise comparisons. An analysis of the ten compounds of interest revealed significantly higher ER in the P treatment compared to both H and C, analysed by a Kruskal-Wallis test (Table 1). None of the ten compounds was detected in the C samples, and five were detected in the H samples at a low rate (Fig. 2). An ...
Context 2
... Blum 1970a;Dumpert 1972;Brand et al. 1989) and lorises ( Hagey et al. 2007). 1-Octanol has been found in the alarm secretions of several bee species (John- son et al. 1985;Collins et al. 1989;Hunt et al. 2003) and stink bugs ( Yamashita et al. 2016). 1-Octanol also showed the highest emission rate of all compounds of interest in our experiment (Fig. 2), followed by unknown compound 7. We provide the experimental m/z spectra of 2-ocatanone, 1-octanol, and unknown compound 7, along with the theoretical NIST spectra for 2-ocatanone and 1-octanol in the Supplemental Material. Evidence of interpreting heterospecific alarm cues is well established, however only in the aquatic environment ...

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... 1-Octanol in essential oils of plants has been reported as a biting deterrent in the mosquito Aedes aegypti 38 and as an oviposition deterrent in the Asian corn borer, Ostrinia furnacalis 39 . A recent study has shown 1-octanol to be a major component of the alarm pheromones in a mammal, the Bank vole Myodes glareolus 40 . However, the function of 1-octanol in O. smaragdina is currently unknown. ...
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Humans have used weaver ants, Oecophylla smaragdina, as biological control agents to control insect pests in orchards for many centuries. Over recent decades, the effectiveness of weaver ants as biological control agents has been attributed in part to deterrent and oviposition inhibiting effects of kairomones produced by the ants, but the chemical identity of these kairomones has remained unknown. We have identified the kairomone responsible for deterrence and oviposition inhibition by O. smaragdina, providing a significant advance in understanding the chemical basis of their predator/prey interactions. Olfactometer assays with extracts from weaver ants demonstrated headspace volatiles to be highly repellent to Queensland fruit fly, Bactrocera tryoni. Using electrophysiology and bioassays, we demonstrate that this repellence is induced by a single compound, 1-octanol. Of 16 compounds identified in O. smaragdina headspace, only 1-octanol evoked an electrophysiological response from B. tryoni antennae. Flies had greatly reduced oviposition and spent significantly less time in an olfactometer arm in the presence of 1-octanol or a synthetic blend of headspace volatiles containing 1-octanol than in the presence of a synthetic blend of headspace volatiles without 1-octanol, or clean air. Taken together, our results demonstrate that 1-octanol is the functional kairomone component of O. smaragdina headspace that explains repellence and oviposition deterrence, and is hence an important contributor to the effectiveness of these ants as biological control agents.