Topographic distribution of Mu-Suppression. Mu-suppression was calculated as the log ratio of power while watching partner squeeze a stress ball over baseline (watching a ball roll with no biological movement). Lower scores indicate more suppression (more mirroring). Note localization over C4.

Topographic distribution of Mu-Suppression. Mu-suppression was calculated as the log ratio of power while watching partner squeeze a stress ball over baseline (watching a ball roll with no biological movement). Lower scores indicate more suppression (more mirroring). Note localization over C4.

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